Prof. Travis Morris’s 2017 Norwich University Convocation Address

Photo: Prof. Travis Morris addresses NU's Class of 2021 at Convocation.
Norwich University Office of Communications

August 30, 2017

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Travis Morris is a terrorism and policing scholar, who directs the Peace & War Center at Norwich University. He is the author of the recent book Dark Ideas, an exploration of how violent jihadists and neo-Nazis ideologues have shaped modern terrorism. On Tuesday, Morris addressed the Norwich community at Convocation. A copy of his prepared remarks follows.

President Schneider, Provost Afentio, deans, faculty, staff, guests, and most importantly the class of 2021: It is indeed an honor for me to be here today.

Incoming students, let me again welcome you to Norwich University. It’s a well-known fact that the audiences rarely remember what a speaker says. So with that in mind, I’ll be direct.

Each one of you is taking a risk by sitting there. Let me explain.

You face numerous challenges over the course of four years. And as you know, every challenge has two sides, success or failure.

As you think about your upcoming four years at Norwich, expect to be tested, intellectually, ethically, and some of you, physically. Expect to ask numerous questions. Expect to learn who you really are and make lifelong friends. Expect to emerge from Norwich more informed, service oriented, and a better person. I know that you have already thought about this and this is why you chose to come to Norwich. Norwich has been in the business of producing some of finest leaders, who have impacted countless lives around the globe and by sitting in those chairs, you aspire to join their ranks. You, however, are at the beginning of this journey, but you are not on this journey and risk taking alone.

The administration, faculty, and staff want you to succeed. We want you to excel and make us proud. But at the same time, we want you to be challenged, so that you leave here with the ability to make the world a better place. We know that some of you sitting here will reach the top positions in the military, government, corporations, academia, the arts, technology, engineering, medicine, law enforcement, and non-profits. We also know that some of you will face tremendous academic, personal, relational, and professional challenges during your four years. However, thousands have gone before you. But as General Sullivan states, “Hope is not a method.” You won’t make it back to these seats for graduation four years from now based on hope.

Taking risks is really a Norwich tradition. “I Will Try,” our motto, is really about taking a risk. That’s it. Norwich’s motto means that you take risks. You either make the shot or not. You either graduate or don’t. You pass the test or not. You either save the life or don’t. I also believe that “I will try” was never meant to be said in a comfortable chair or in a lackadaisical tone. Often the Norwich motto is uttered in stressful, uncertain situations with high stakes.

The first Norwich risk taker was our founder, Capt. Alden Partridge. You’ll pass his statue who knows how many times during your four years at Norwich. His ability to face challenges and take risks have impacted thousands. And you and everyone else sitting here today is part of his legacy. However, his actions took place a long time ago and have normalized over time. The courage required or the consequences of failure is often forgotten or taken for granted. It’s hard to picture Capt. Partridge sitting at his desk in 1866 after … the impact of the Civil War. He began the fall semester with only 19 students. Imagine the risks involved! Or Dr. Homer L. Dodge, former Norwich professor and president, was also a risk taker. Like Capt. Partridge, he challenged teaching conventions of the day.  He also visited a young man in Omaha, Nebraska, named Warren Buffet, before Buffet became one of the richest men in the world. Dr. Homer L. Dodge liked what he heard and invested thousands of dollars based on this young man’s advice, and guess what? That risk paid off. His thousands became millions. Taking risks can end in success sometimes.

If you allow me to offer you some points from my perspective that may be of benefit to you as you take risks and face the upcoming challenges during your time at Norwich. In some small way, I hope to share some lessons learned. These points are meant to assist you and come from serving as a Ranger-qualified infantry officer with the 10th Mountain Division, my years as a police officer, and as a criminologist at Norwich.

You cannot do it alone. You cannot do it alone. The United States Army Ranger School is one of the toughest training courses the Army has to offer. To me, a 22-year-old at the time, Army Ranger School was a lifetime of challenges, with the very real risk of failure crammed into a few months. Ranger students train to exhaustion, pushing the limits of their minds and bodies. Ranger School students learn whether they can lead or follow when tired, hungry, physically on the edge of exhaustion, and pushed to their often previously untested limits. Ranger School was more like getting into a car wreck. It was a collision, not a jostle. I learned that it is possible to actually sleep and walk at the same time.  At one point in the school I thought the sunset was a mountain rock ledge that I continually tried to step under but later realized that it really was a hallucination caused by carrying over a hundred pounds of gear, starvation, sleep deprivation, pushed physical limits, and the stress of being evaluated. To be sure, any soldier who attends Ranger School will be a better leader for it.

You see, no matter how prepared you are mentally or physically, you will break down at some point. You’ll have moments where you think you just can’t go any farther, and you need someone to tell you that there is only one mile left, someone to take 25 pounds of equipment off your back so you can make it up the mountain or through the swamp. You have a Ranger buddy, someone who you are paired with throughout the entire school if you both make it through. Your Ranger buddy not only helps, but becomes someone you don’t want to let down. You actually can do more than you imagine because someone is there to push and support you. Being a lone ranger is not the goal, and my Ranger buddy is a lifelong friend. There is a reason that some of you call each other Rook buddies—you need them.

You may not know this now but you soon will: You are surrounded by some of the finest faculty and staff in the United States. I’m honored to know them and call them colleagues. They are here to push you, challenge you. But also assist you to carry your academic load when you feel like you can’t go any further. Notice I said, “assist.” You still have to shoulder the weight. But they will both encourage you and hold you to a standard. They will see potential in you that some of you don’t currently. Some of them will spark an idea, offer a word of encouragement, challenge you in such a way that it will alter your life path. Some of you will stay in contact with them for the rest of your lives (or theirs), because they played a pivotal role in impacting you during your time here. So remember: You cannot do it alone. Depend on others. Find a mentor.

Own your mistakes. Some of you have been pulled over by a police officer. In another life, before academia, I used to be that guy who met you by the side of your vehicle. I have heard every excuse imaginable and those even unimaginable. These include, after finding drugs in a suspect’s pants pocket, being told with a straight face that these were not his pants. He just put them on at a party he just left. I never asked why he wasn’t wearing pants at the party in the first place. What I learned from those thousands of interactions with the public was that some people were honest, despite what they had done, and told the truth. They owned that they had broken the law. They had moral courage and recognized they had made a mistake when they, in fact, had.

You will make mistakes at Norwich. Some of you more than others. However, be honest and tell your professors, cadre, RA, parents, friends that you made a mistake. Corruption begins at the smallest levels at first, and then it will grow. Own your mistakes. Learn from them. Deal with the consequences and move on. Show yourself to be someone that others can trust.

Small tasks turn into large ones. Some of you in the distant future will write a dissertation for a PhD. While some of you this year will feel like you are working on a dissertation, you can be certain that the faculty will tell you that you are not. I look to my colleagues, who know how arduous, psychologically challenging, and difficult the dissertation process can be. Fifty percent of PhD students don’t finish and most of it has to do with not being able to finish the dissertation. During the dissertation process, you have a committee that reviews your work. When I was almost at the end of my dissertation, a committee member told me that I had to make certain changes. However, these changes would take over a year to complete. A year or more. The next day, as I sat looking at an empty computer screen trying to move the project forward and wondering how I was going to support my family, progress started with one small task. Putting words on a page. Words were soon typed on the screen, which then become sentences, which became pages, which become chapters and moved the project ahead one day at a time or really one word at a time.  The dissertation was successfully defended and that chapter closed.

Translation to you… . Don’t get overwhelmed by the challenge of your papers, projects, or labs. Pick one thing you can do, be consistent, and do it. These small things will eventually lead to completing a larger, much more complex project.

Put yourself in unfamiliar territory. In 2017, news about the nation of Yemen, which is located at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, involves war, al Qaeda, ISIS fighters, or the biggest cholera outbreak in decades. However, I was able to do some research there several years ago. Yes, those news headlines are unfortunately true. But they’re not the only Yemen. Just like there is never one side to a cube. One cannot simply paint a nation, region, or a people group with broad brush strokes. To me, Yemen reminds me of some of the most hospitable people I’ve ever met, amazing mountaineers, unsurpassed scenery, kindness, and a remarkable history. Being in unfamiliar territory can often challenge your own biases or assumptions. You leave seeing yourself and that territory with enlightenment.

You are in unfamiliar territory right now. NU is unfamiliar to you, the Corps is unfamiliar, university academics is unfamiliar, and Vermont may be unfamiliar. But, believe it or not, this will soon become your new normal. You and your environment will equalize. Don’t become stagnate when it does.

There are [many] nations represented at Norwich. Make it a goal of yours to welcome them, learn from them, and ask them questions. Going overseas does not have to involve physical travel. It can begin with the international student in your residence hall, classroom, or platoon. Study overseas if you can. And if you can’t, spend a semester overseas, participate with NU Visions Abroad or another overseas NU experience. Continue to find unfamiliar territory for you to explore.

Believe that you are talented. Every one of us is talented. Some talents are more visible and valued than others, but we all have them. I can remember a student in class a couple years ago who may represent, in some way, the way some of you may think right now. When I asked a question during class, he would almost always raise his hand and give a well-thought, articulate answer. One day after class, we had a conversation, and I was shocked to hear him describe himself as being “not that smart.” I disagreed and questioned why he thought this way and was told that he was not a good test-taker. He was told by a teacher in high school that he was not intelligent and should focus on athletics. Maybe he needed to learn how to take tests more effectively. Maybe others only saw his kinesthetic intelligence. Maybe he did not know the most effective way to process information. But somehow along the way, they missed that he was intelligent. Although this may not be the case for you, it’s important for you to find your true talents and be proud of them.

It is critically important for you to know that you are talented and to be confident in whatever it is you can do well, even to the point when others tell you the opposite. For some of you, you’ll discover your talents here at Norwich. You’ll find that you can write, translate, solve, interpret, mediate, create, make, and the list goes on. Believe in your talents.

Make the most of every situation. Like it or not you now live in Vermont. Make the most of your time here, enjoy it. This will become easier after your rook year. There are always positive rays of light no matter where you are. I agree, sometimes, depending on the circumstances, the rays can be very dim, but they are there. The challenge is to find them, but you can. But for you, you’re in one of the most beautiful parts of the country. Don’t become numb to the beauty around you, no matter what the season, and chose to make the most of this special place you now reside. Making the most of every situation is more about a philosophy than Vermont. Some of you, though you don’t know it now, will find yourself in very tough and unwelcoming places. Make the most of it, and try to see the best in others.

Class of 2021, you are beginning a journey that involves risk, but it will change you. Four years from now you will not be the same person. One of the rewards staff and faculty share is to see how you change from first year students to seniors. You will face challenges. You will fail and you will succeed. But in the end, when you are sitting here once again for graduation, you will be prepared to lead others through some of the most difficult circumstances this world can throw at you. Becoming that type of person does not happen by hoping it does or without thoughtful planning. For almost 200 years, Norwich University faculty and staff have helped students like you give the world hope and set an example of what it means to be a leader, work hard, make the right choice, and get the most out of life. When you walk past Capt. Alden Partridge’s statue remember that he was a risk taker. He worked with others. He was honest, talented. He made mistakes and made the best of situations. Your Norwich journey started a few days ago when you arrived on campus. Remember that you are not alone in this process. Use all of Norwich’s resources to prepare you to lead, serve, and impact the world. Four years will go by fast. So make the most of your time at Norwich. Make us proud now and in the future. We’ll see you in the classroom tomorrow.

Norwich Forever!

3 Questions for Norwich Criminal Justice Scholar Stephanie Maass

Photo: Studio portrait of Stephanie Maass
Norwich University Office of Communications

May 18, 2017

Corrections scholar Stephanie Maass, PhD, teaches in the School of Justice Studies and Sociology at Norwich, where she says she strives to “foster discussions, the sharing of ideas” in the classroom and broaden students’ conceptual frameworks. Her courses range from intro surveys and senior seminars to examinations of juvenile justice and corrections. During her master’s and doctoral studies at George Mason University, Maass honed a research focus on community corrections, substance use and co-occurring disorders, and organizational change. The scholar has trained corrections officers across the country on the use of evidence-based supervision practices. We recently asked Maass about her teaching and scholarship.

1. Why do you teach?

I teach to help students become critical and responsible consumers of information. I strive to challenge their preconceived notions with information they may not be aware of and guide them while they think through the realistic challenges facing our world today.

2. What drives your passion for the field?

The criminal justice system is often bleakly portrayed as a broken system plagued with corruption and high recidivism rates. I look at the system and I see potential, particularly in the corrections field. Community correction, in particular, offers a significant amount of time to work with justice-involved individuals to rehabilitate them, reintegrate them into society, and increase public safety. We only need to pay attention to what approaches work best and how to successfully implement those strategies.

3. What questions do you explore through your scholarship?

Currently in the field of corrections the adoption rate of best practices is about 33%. We know quite a bit about what works to reduce recidivism but quite a bit less about how to implement those effective strategies on a large scale. My research seeks to understand the adoption—or lack of adoption—of best supervision practices among individuals in organizations. What makes one individual or agency more likely to use best practices than another? And which practices are they likely to use over others?

Hard Work, Promise, and Hope: Norwich Honors Class of 2017

Photo: Norwich President Richard Schneider speaks during Commencement 2017
Norwich University Office of Communications

May 15, 2017

Norwich University celebrated its 380 graduating seniors at Commencement and Commissioning ceremonies this past weekend, honoring the many accomplishments of the Class of 2017 from the nation’s oldest private military college.

On Saturday, 232 Corps of Cadets and 142 civilian students walked across the stage in Shapiro Field House before an adoring and proud assembly of family, friends, faculty, military leaders, and staff. The graduates received diplomas in 1 master’s degree and 32 undergraduate programs.

Civilian student Timothy Bain ’17, who earned a master’s in architecture, was the first new alumnus to receive his diploma. Corps of Cadets member Kurtis Leonard ’17, a sports medicine and health science major, was the last. But the magna cum laude graduate certainly wasn’t the least.

At Sunday’s Commissioning ceremony, 105 seniors formally began their careers as military officers in the United States Army, Air Force, Navy and Marines.

Throughout the weekend, the Norwich community, its distinguished guests, and especially the Class of 2017 honored and reflected on the hard work of its newest graduates, the challenges they face, and the hope they embody.

Norwich President Richard W. Schneider began Saturday’s commencement ceremony by wishing everyone a happy Mother’s Day. He invited all the mothers present to stand for a round of applause. (Seizing a marketing opportunity, he also invited all future mothers to send a child to Norwich, a well-worn pitch met with laughter.)

Addressing the Class of 2017, President Schneider, an avid reader of U.S. presidential biographies, quoted John Quincy Adams: “If your actions inspire others to dream more, do more, become more, you are a leader.”

“That’s what the entire faculty and staff want for you,” Schneider told the seniors seated before him, dressed in traditional black caps and gowns or elegant navy and white formal cadet uniforms.

Speaking of the ideal character embodied by Norwich graduates, Schneider said, “We may fail, but we never quit.” He then offered a second Adams quote: Try and fail. But do not fail to try. “So that’s my gift to you, the senior class.”

Don Wallace, a professor of mechanical engineering, retired after a 55-year teaching career at Norwich. He was among those to receive an honorary Norwich doctorate on Saturday. In brief acceptance remarks, he shared lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein from the 1945 Broadway musical Carousel with the senior class.

General David G. Perkins, chief of recruitment and training for the entire U.S. Army, gave the Commencement keynote address. He advised graduates that a key to happiness and well-being in life is the ability to feel and show gratitude. Perkins reminded the Class of 2017 that “life is a team sport” and that each and every one of us owe the people around us our thanks.

Perkins also counseled seniors to put character ahead of the career ladder. “Spend some time thinking about who you are,” he said. “Focus on who you are first, and let the accomplishments follow.”

Many faculty, parents, and students shared reflections and advice that day. Earlier, College of Professional Schools Dean Aron Tempkin addressed the 31 graduating nurses and their friends and family in White Chapel at a morning nurses pinning ceremony. “I’m incredibly proud of you, as I’m sure everyone in this room is.”

Upholding tradition, senior nursing graduates Olivia Como ’17 and Jill Howard ’17 gave a humorous, heartfelt address to their fellow program classmates. “To my classmates entering the military, stay safe,” Howard advised in closing. “To my classmates entering the hospital, stay sane.”

Elsewhere, School of Architecture + Art Program Director Danny Sagan addressed graduates of the undergraduate and graduate architecture programs at Chaplin Hall in a small ceremony before Commencement.

Friends and family gathered in an open, first-floor gallery showcasing senior projects. The designs spanned a light-filled American embassy, an Antarctic research station, a resilient waterfront community, and a cutting-edge project that sculpted a New York City soundscape through architecture.

“This world of our needs a lot of good design—and they need it soon,” said Sagan, one of many faculty who spoke during the ceremony. The professor and practicing architect observed that no one attends a military college or an architecture program thinking it will be easy. Both are environments that value perseverance in the face of adversity, he said.

“It’s always great to celebrate what you have done,” he said in closing. “But really we’re celebrating what you will do.”

Other ceremonies on campus that morning celebrated the work of students at the School of Business and Management and the David Crawford School of Engineering. In Dole Auditorium, Norwich engineering graduates joined the Order of the Engineer, receiving symbolic metal rings.

As the day progressed and Commencement approached, friends and family gathered outside Shapiro Field House.

Kevin Hill from Bridgeport, Conn., intently combed a Commencement program, wearing a suit and a red and gold tie from USC, his alma mater. He wryly explained that he wanted to confirm that his son Trevor, a Studies in War and Peace major and Corps of Cadets cadre member, was indeed graduating.

Hill said Norwich taught his son rigor and discipline and honed his inherent respect for others. “It’s really turned him into a good young guy,” Hill said. “We like him a lot.”

After graduation, the younger Hill heads to California for a summer job as a wildland firefighter, work he hopes to continue in the fall while applying to the California National Guard.

John Dippolito drove from New Jersey to watch his son Peter graduate. The Norwich senior served in the Corps of Cadets, majored in Criminal Justice, and minored in Leadership. “I’m very proud,” the elder Dippolito said. “He’s just grown tremendously.”

Senior LaShawn Thomas, a Business Management major from San Antonio had a baker’s dozen of family members from Texas; Sacramento, Calif.; and Boston, Mass. there to support him.

“He’s going to be a great citizen after Norwich,” said his father Eli. “He was great when he got here, and Norwich made him even a little bit better.”

NU Student Engineers Nerd Out to Solve Urban Water Challenges

Norwich engineering majors Austin Renzetti and Sarah Perry (screen shot from video)
Norwich University Office of Communications

February 1, 2017

At a busy gathering in Kreitzberg Library last December, civil and environmental engineering majors in Prof. Tara Kulkarni’s Environmental Engineering lab shared project designs that addressed major water management challenges in cities across the globe. The Norwich undergraduates worked on the four-week, group projects as part of a service learning partnership with a community partner, Friends of the Winooski River, to promote water education and outreach to local high school students. Watch:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMO2vRX47hI&w=560&h=315]

Top 10 Norwich University News Stories of 2016

Norwich CSIA majors, faculty and alumni stand in front of Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif., on the eve of Super Bowl 50
Norwich University Office of Communications

December 14, 2016

It’s that time of year—a chance to highlight just some of the many accomplishments of Norwich University’s outstanding students, alumni, faculty, and staff during 2016. While they may make taking on difficult challenges and achieving distinction look effortless, it isn’t. A case in point: This list of stories below. In the end, we couldn’t winnow it to ten and were forced to sneak in four more.


1. Norwich Cyber Majors Help Safeguard Super Bowl 50

After a year of preparation, Norwich CSIA majors and faculty based in California and Northfield, Vt., worked with Santa Clara city, California state, and federal law enforcement officials to analyze and flag potential cybersecurity threats during the NFL championship matchup between the Denver Broncos and Carolina Panthers.

2. Norwich University Celebrates 100 Years of ROTC
The birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, Norwich University celebrated ROTC’s centennial anniversary with a leadership symposium in April that drew scores of military VIPs. Among them, 39th U.S. Army Chief of Staff General Mark A. Milley, who gave the keynote address.

3. Norwich Class of 2020 Largest in University History
This fall, Norwich welcomed close to 900 first-year students to campus, the largest incoming class in the university’s nearly 200-year history.

4. Forbes Awards Norwich an “A” for Financial Strength
In August, Forbes magazine published their analysis of the financial footing of roughly 900 private colleges and universities, ranking Norwich University in the top 20 percent.

5. Writing Prof. Sean Prentiss Wins National Outdoor Book Award
Winning the history/biography category, Finding Abbey chronicled Prentiss’s two-year search for the hidden desert grave of environmental writer Edward Abbey.

6. Student-Built Tiny House Showcases Innovation, Hands-On Service Learning
Norwich architecture, construction management, and engineering majors and faculty designed and built C.A.S.A. (Creating Affordable Sustainable Architecture), a 334-square-foot tiny house with a small price tag to address Vermont’s affordable-housing crisis. See related article and video.

7. Norwich’s Standout Athletic Teams and Coaches Fight to a Four-Way Tie

8. Nisid Hajari Wins NU’s 2016 William E. Colby Book Award
A journalist who oversees Asia coverage for the editorial page of Bloomberg News, the first-time author won for Midnight’s Furies, an account of the 1947 partition of India and its surrounding violence following the end of British colonial rule. Founded at Norwich University, the annual book award and symposium celebrates outstanding writers, authors, and ideas from the fields of military affairs, military history, intelligence, and international affairs.

9. NUARI Cyber Attack Simulation Software Nominated for “Innovation of the Year”
Developed by the Norwich University Applied Research Institutes, the DECIDE-FS cyber-gaming platform has been used by major U.S. financial industry firms, regulators and law enforcement agencies to test institutional preparedness and resiliency in the face of cyberattacks.

10. Norwich Wins $700K+ NSA Grant to Train Next-Generation Cyber Soldiers
Working in collaboration with the United States Army Reserve, the National Security Agency announced in December that it had awarded Norwich over $700,000 to support scholarships for soldiers.

Bonus: Washington Post Columnist Says NU’s “I Will Try” Is Best College Motto
Writing in her Answer Sheet blog for the Washington Post, education reporter Valerie Strauss opines on “The Small Vermont University With Arguably the Best School Motto.”

A Norwich-MIT Collaboration to Develop Low Cost Drinking Water Testing

Video still: MIT engineer Susan Murcott and Norwich environmental chemist Seth Frisbie speak in a Norwich chemistry lab

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0vFiw9tAfc&w=560&h=315]

Norwich University Office of Communications

December 1, 2016

Norwich University environmental chemist Prof. Seth Frisbie, PhD, has spent much of his career investigating the presence of arsenic and other toxic metals in drinking water in Bangladesh and other developing countries.

In November, he hosted MIT water and waste-water engineer Susan Murcott to Norwich to give a talk and to continue their work on a number of collaborative projects. One involves the development of a low cost, portable drinking water spectrophotometer for field use in Nepal and other developing countries.

Norwich University electrical and computer engineering professor Michael Prairie, PhD, PE, explains how his design lab students are helping advance the prototype design to build a rugged, easy-to-use unit ready for field use.

“Fire & Ice” Author Jonathan Mingle Visits Norwich Writers Series

Photo: Author Jonathan Mingle speaks at lecture in Kreitzberg Library on the Norwich campus

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zb9RS4_TCqE&w=560&h=315]

Norwich University Office of Communications

November 1, 2016

On campus for a Norwich Writers Series reading last week, journalist and author Jonathan Mingle took time to discuss three central ideas from his recent book on black carbon, global warming, and its impact on a small Himalayan village. Norwich Associate Writing Professor and Writers Series Director Sean Prentiss makes a cameo. And Tara Kulkarni, an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, discusses how Mingle’s book and reading helps her students as academics, researchers, and citizens by cutting across disciplines—using story to connect climate change, people, and policy.

Armed With Cardboard and Duct Tape, Norwich Students Battle Like Ancient Greeks

Photo of Norwich students holding cardboard shields and wearing makeshift helmets in the style of ancient Greek Hoplite foot soldiers

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oy1EI7cSbPs&w=560&h=315]

Norwich University Office of Communications

November 1, 2016

This fall, Norwich undergraduates tested their mettle as ancient Greek warriors. Using cardboard shields and makeshift foam spears, they assembled on the Upper Parade ground to recreate phalanxes of the fearsome ancient foot soldiers known as Hoplites. The exercise brought together students and faculty from a variety of courses and majors: history, military studies, and studies in war in peace to test theories of how the ancient warriors may have marched and fought so effectively. Norwich students Carly Rotter and Shane O’Neil talk about their cardboard armaments, while Norwich history professors Steven Sodergren, Emily Fischer Gray, and Christine McCann discuss the battle reenactment and its value as a learning exercise.

Video: Inside Norwich’s C.A.S.A. 802 Tiny House

Video still: Architect and NU Assistant Professor Tolya Stonorov speaks in front of bright red orange door of C.A.S.A. 802 tiny house.
Norwich University Office of Communications

September 27, 2016

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0upWIKBCXQ&w=560&h=315]

Learn more about C.A.S.A. 802, a modular, tiny house project designed and built by faculty and students from Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art, David Crawford School of Engineering, and construction management programs. Energy efficient and sustainably designed, the $30,000 structure offers a modern alternative to mobile homes for young families and can be expanded over time.

Related Article:[gap size=”-15%”]

Ideas @ Work: Tiny House

Video: Why First-Year Science Majors Read “The Martian”

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYDSqc04yWg&w=560&h=315]

Norwich University Office of Communications

September 21, 2016

Incoming freshman in Norwich University’s College of Science and Mathematics discuss Andy Weir’s blockbuster about survival, science, engineering, and leadership on the Red Planet. Prof. David Westerman discusses why he recommended the book and NU Board of Fellows member and UVM polymer chemist Chris Allen leads the discussion.