Norwich Writers Series presents play and playwright

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

March 28, 2016

Norwich University’s 2015-16 Writers Series presents “Rodeo Gals,” a play written and produced by Jeanne Beckwith, March 31 – April 2, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Dole Auditorium.

The performance of “Rodeo Gals” on Saturday, April 2, will be followed by an interactive “Talk Back” with Beckwith and the actors.

A Norwich Adjunct Professor in playwriting and theater, Beckwith has been writing and producing plays since 1982. She received her doctorate from the University of Georgia.

A director as well as a playwright, Beckwith has worked both in children’s theatre and as a professional actor in summer repertory theatre. Her plays have been produced around the United States and abroad, including a production of her play “A War Story at the Rialto” by the State Theater in Turkey in Ankara and Istanbul. In addition to her playwriting skills, Beckwith specializes in drama and acting.

The Norwich Writers Series is produced by the College of Liberal Arts, the Department of English & Communications, and Pegasus Players. All Writers Series events are free and open to the public.

For more information, please visit the Writers Series website: writers.norwich.edu.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Astrophysicist Tabetha Hole on Supernovas, Teaching, and the Universe

Norwich University Office of Communications

March 25, 2016

K. Tabetha Hole joined the Norwich physics faculty last fall as an assistant professor. The daughter of an American doctor, she was born in Nigeria and earned her PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Using computer models and Chandra X-Ray Telescope data, her ongoing research studies the structure of supernovas and massive star winds. This spring, she teaches Intro to Astronomy, the capstone Senior Seminar II, and an independent study while supervising a senior research project. In a recent interview, Hole reflected upon the beauty and mystery of the universe and teaching.

Pop quiz: In 60 seconds or less, explain dark matter.

Dark matter is a name for our ignorance. If we look at the structure of galaxies, how fast the sun is going around the center of our galaxy should tell us how much mass there is in the galaxy. When we look at that, the amount of gravitational mass is way more than we can account for by actually looking at the stuff that’s there.

Ninety percent of the mass of the universe does not correspond to anything we know about on Earth. We’ve tried to account for it. But [we] just can’t. There’s missing mass. We know its effect. But we don’t know what it is, and that’s what we call “dark matter.” It’s “dark,” because it doesn’t glow. It doesn’t interact with light. It’s some completely different kind of matter that we’ve never been able to touch or detect directly. Obviously, we’ve been trying to. But we still don’t know what it is, and we’ve been looking for decades.

What do you call yourself?

Astronomer, astrophysicist, and, of course, physics professor. I spend most of my time being a physics professor. It is my focus, because I really enjoy teaching. Generating new knowledge is wonderful. But as is true in pretty much every academic discipline, if I discover something new about stars, only a few people in the world will ever read about that. Whereas, working with students, teaching introductory physics, I am able to share with them something beautiful and amazing about the universe.

You published a research paper titled, “Can We Detect Clumpiness in Supernova Ejecta?” Well, can we?

Yes.

Why should we care about supernovas?

When a star explodes, it turns out that that explosion makes most of the heavier elements in the universe. The iron in your blood had to be made in a supernova—there’s no other way to make iron—and probably more than one. So the iron in your blood came from multiple stars exploding. We can see supernovas across the universe. They affect the stars around them. They start star formation. They end star formation. They are responsible for changing the chemical makeup of the universe over time. They are responsible for making us. They are a test for our understanding of physics in extreme conditions that we just can’t do on Earth. If you want to study how the universe changes over billions of years or how galaxies change, you have to understand what happens in [supernovas].

Does your brain ever hurt thinking about these things?

Not so much. I think maybe the bigger puzzle is how to get students to understand. Because especially in physics, you first have to remove the misconception and then you can bring in the real fun. And that’s something no one knows how to do perfectly. I mean people ask, If we can put a man on the moon, why can’t we feed the hungry? The reason we can’t is because of people. We can harness the power of a couple thousand people who want to work together to go to the moon. [But] you can’t put people in a box and poke them until they do what you want. All in all, I would definitely rather feed the hungry. Humans in some ways are a much harder puzzle than the universe. Helping people learn more about themselves and learn more about the world, that is actually in some ways a bigger challenge.

You say your interest in physics was sparked, in part, while studying astronomy in high school. You mention things like studying the phases of the moon. The moment when you visualized that relationship from space, rather than the surface of the Earth, and how that suddenly provided clarity. Can you talk about that?

By changing your perspective, something that was incredibly complicated becomes incredibly simple and elegant. That’s a larger part of what I find so amazing about the universe. You take things that are on surface incredibly complicated and you peel back the layers to find the incredibly simple rules that the universe operates by. Then you can build back up to the complication, piece by piece, and understand each one. And then the universe is not this weird unpredictable mess. It’s actually beautiful and elegant underneath, even if it’s not what we would ever have expected.

What excites you about the field today?

Oh, there’s so much. One big [thing] is that we now have a new way of looking at the universe: gravitational waves. It’s like opening your eyes. When we’re in astronomy, all we can do is study what the universe sends us. Most of the information it sends us is in light, radio waves, x-rays. Gravity comes from mass. So we now have a tool for looking at things that don’t even necessarily produce light. It’s going to give us more information that we could’ve gotten in the next hundred years using regular telescopes. So that is the most exciting thing right now. That we have a fundamental new way of knowing about the universe.

Norwich University hosts 9th Annual CSI Symposium April 19-20

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

March 25, 2016

Norwich University will host its ninth annual CSI Symposium on Tuesday and Wednesday, April 19-20 in Dole Auditorium.

All events are free and open to the public.

The symposium begins on Tuesday, April 19 with “The Colorado Movie Theater Shooting: Prosecuting a Mass Murder Capital Case,” a keynote lecture by George Brauchler, district attorney for the 18th Judicial District, from 5-7 p.m.

Presentations on Wednesday, April 20, include:

  • 9 a.m. “Mission Overview: Naval Criminal Investigative Service”
    Samuel G. Worth ’87
    (NCIS)
  • 10 a.m. “The Task Force: A Critical Concept in 21st Century Law Enforcement” John (Jay) T. Fallon(NEHIDTA)
  • 11 a.m. “Opiate Outreach Initiative – A Plan of Action to Combat the Opium Epidemic” Frederick Ryan(Arlington, Mass., Police Department)
  • 1 p.m. “Internal Threats: A Case Study in Corporate Security Asset Protection” Spencer Krupp ’11(Burns & McDonnell)
  • 2 p.m. “Anti-Money Laundering and Fraud in Banking” Robert Colatarci ’95, M’03(Experis)

A complete schedule and speakers’ biographies can be found at http://libarts.norwich.edu/csi-symposium/.

The CSI Symposium is co-sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and the Norwich University Board of Fellows and is open to the public.

For more information, please contact the event coordinators: Isabel Weinger Nielsen, inielsen@norwich.edu, 802.485.2455 or Professor Penny Shtull, pshtull@norwich.edu>, 802.485.2373.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich presents award winning author and poet

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

March 24, 2016

The Norwich Writers Series presents author Kerrin McCadden on April 11 at 4:30 p.m. in the Kreitzberg Library Multipurpose Room.

McCadden is the author of “Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes,” winner of the 2013 New Issues Poetry Prize and the 2015 Vermont Book Award. One judge of the New Issues Poetry Prize said her book was “one of the most compelling and powerful debut collections in recent American poetry.”

Sponsored by Vermont Humanities, this special event is part of PoemCampus, a celebration of poetry across campus, and is free and open to the public.

A 2013 National Endowment for the Arts Fellow in Poetry, McCadden was also awarded a 2013 Sustainable Arts Foundation Writing Award, as well as support from The Vermont Arts Endowment Fund and The Vermont Studio Center.

Her poems have appeared in Best American Poetry, The Academy of American Poets’ “Poem-a-Day” series, “Verse Daily,American Poetry Review,Rattle,Green Mountains Review,Hayden’s Ferry Review,” “Poet Lore” and elsewhere.

She holds an MFA from The Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College and lives in Plainfield, Vermont.

The Norwich Writers Series is produced by the College of Liberal Arts, the Department of English & Communications, and the Vermont Humanities. All Writers Series events are free and open to the public.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich University computer security program part of major security event, Super Bowl 50

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

March 21, 2016

The Norwich University computer security and information assurance (CSIA) program, with students operating both onsite in California and on campus, supported Santa Clara Police Department, the lead law enforcement agency at Super Bowl 50, and the law enforcement and homeland security functions leading up to and during this international sporting event.

Norwich University was the only educational institution invited to participate in support of the public safety team tasked with safeguarding Super Bowl 50. With support from over 60 students working at its campus based Global Threat Observatory, Norwich cybersecurity students and faculty collaborated with Levi’s Stadium – the host for the event – and with the Super Bowl 50 Critical Infrastructure & Cyber Protection Sub Committee, the represented agencies and their personnel. This committee was led by Detective Sergeant Ray Carreira ’96 of the Santa Clara Police Department, the lead law enforcement agency for the event.

Throughout 2015 CSIA students worked with this team in preparation for this globally televised event and formed partnerships with leading software developers to support their work.

Norwich University’s participation was made possible in part with generous support by these critical providers:

  • Barrier 1 Barrier 1 patented process delivers the ability to accurately detect and protect against all forms of known and never-before-seen cyber attacks in real time and at the point of impact. Barrier1 uses an Intelligent based analytical based engine that utilizes over 25,000 sensors on board that feed a series of behavior algorithms.
  • Carbon Black Carbon Black leads a new era of endpoint security by enabling organizations to disrupt advanced attacks, deploy the best prevention strategies for their business, and leverage the expertise of 10,000 professionals from IR firms, MSSPs and enterprises to shift the balance of power back to security teams. Only Carbon Black continuously records and centrally retains all endpoint activity, making it easy to track an attacker’s every action, instantly scope every incident, unravel entire attacks and determine root causes. Carbon Black also offers a range of prevention options so organizations can match their endpoint defense to their business needs. Carbon Black has been named #1 in endpoint protection, incident response, and market share. Forward-thinking companies choose Carbon Black to arm their endpoints, enabling security teams to: Disrupt. Defend. Unite.
  • Intel 471 Intel 471’s online portal and API provide clients with actionable and proactive cyber threat intelligence information for integration with customers’ own security and fraud detection systems. We track financially motivated cyber criminals and hacktivists and are described as an “actor-centric cyber threat intelligence collection capability” for our customers.
  • ProtectWise™ ProtectWise is disrupting the network security industry with its Cloud Network DVR, a virtual camera in the cloud that records everything on the network, which allows security professionals to see threats in real time and retrospectively for complete detection and visibility of enterprise threats. ProtectWise was used to monitor network activity and identify threats.
  • Pwnie Express Pwnie Express provides threat detection of the billions of devices in and around your workplace. By automating wireless and wired device detection, Pwnie solutions continuously detect the devices on or around your network that are open pathways for attackers. Pwnie arms your security team to win the BYOD battle with the ability to detect and fingerprint any device, from phone to thermostat, in order to prioritize your security response, reduce alert fatigue, and provide situational intelligence.
  • Silobreaker Silobreaker products help security and intelligence professionals make sense of the overwhelming amount of data on the web. By providing powerful tools and visualizations that cut through and analyze data from hundreds of thousands of open sources, Silobreaker makes it easy for users to monitor and investigate threat actors, attack types, vulnerabilities, instabilities, geopolitical developments, or any other topic or event.  Customers save time by working more efficiently through large data-sets and improving their expertise, knowledge and decision-making by examining and interpreting the data more easily.

Levi’s Stadium, home of Super Bowl 50, is one of the most technologically capable stadiums in the world. In preparation, CSIA students attended Wrestlemania and a major soccer match for fact-finding and familiarization with the security environment.

Super Bowl 50 was broadcast in over 180 countries in 25 languages and was expected to reach over 115 million households in the USA, making it the most viewed event in history.

“I have been so impressed by these Norwich students and their professionalism, their ability to solve complex problems and the ease with which they have integrated into this intense law enforcement environment,” said Captain Phil Cooke, Santa Clara Police Department Super Bowl 50 Commander.

The Norwich University cybersecurity program began in 1999.

Ranked #2 by the Ponemon Institute for cyber security in the U.S., Norwich University programs are consistently ranked among the best in the nation for cyber security education.  Norwich University is recognized as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and has received designation as a Center of Digital Forensics Academic Excellence (CDFAE) by the Defense Cyber Crime Center (DC3). Beginning in 2002, Norwich University became a member of what is now called National Science Foundation’s Cyber Corps: Scholarship for Service program. Norwich is partnered with the United States Army Reserves (USAR) to develop cyber-education curricula that align with federal standards and cybersecurity needs.

“When I read about all the impressive work Norwich is doing with cyber, I took the opportunity to connect that expertise to a function for law enforcement of this major event,” Carreira said.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Architect, Educator and Community Leader Margaret Griffin to Speak at Norwich Architecture + Art’s Lecture Series

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

March 17, 2016

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art presents “Back to Basics or Migrant Form?” a lecture by Margaret Griffin, FAIA, co-founder of the Los Angeles based firm Griffin Enright Architects.

A continuation of the spring 2016 lecture series, this event will be held on Friday, Mar. 25, at 4 p.m. in the Chaplin Hall Gallery and is free and open to the public.

Griffin is an architect, educator, and community leader who co-founded Griffin Enright Architects in an effort to establish a collaborative, creative, and forward-thinking practice.

The firm’s fluid and dynamic work combines innovative design and experimentation in a desire to explore cultural complexities relative to the built environment. Griffin Enright Architects’ work has been acknowledged on a local, national, and global scale receiving dozens of awards for design excellence from the American Institute of Architecture (AIA) and the American Architecture Award from the Chicago Athenaeum.

Griffin’s design education includes both a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Syracuse University and a Master of Architecture degree from University of Virginia. Upon graduating, she was granted a fellowship from the American Academy in Rome to investigate the relationship between urban form and landforms, a subject she continues to examine in her architectural practice through landscape design.

While busy running her emerging practice, Griffin is also a practicing Professor at Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), with twenty-two years of experience teaching at universities including Syracuse University, University of Southern California, and University of California, Los Angeles.

Griffin is also an active and participating member of her community, committing her time to service as an appointed member of Santa Monica’s Architectural Review Board and previously as a member of the AIA Board of Directors, Los Angeles chapter.

The NU School of Architecture + Art Lecture Series is supported by a generous grant from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation. For more than 10 years, the Byrne Foundation has partnered with Norwich University to bring eminent national and international architects, designers, artists, and writers to campus. Events are free and open to the public.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich Presents Poetry Reading and Discussion of Armenian Genocide

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

March 16, 2016

The Norwich University Writers Series presents award-winning author Dana Walrath, PhD, on Wednesday, March 23, from 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. in the Chaplin Hall Gallery.

Walrath is the granddaughter of survivors of the Armenian genocide of 1915. This event combines her poetry reading along with commentary by special panelist Professor of History Rowland Brucken, who teaches courses on genocide, prosecuting human rights abuses, the Cold War, civil rights movements, and nation-building, and specializes in human rights law.

Presented in conjunction with the Peace and War Center and sponsored by Vermont Humanities, this special event is part of PoemCampus, a celebration of poetry across campus, and is free and open to the public.

Walrath earned a PhD in anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania, an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and a BA from Barnard College, Columbia University. She completed “Like Water on Stone” (Delacorte/Random House, 2014), her first novel, during the year she spent as a Fulbright Scholar in Armenia working on a project that builds on her award-winning graphic memoir series “Aliceheimer’s” (Penn State Press, 2016). When not in the mountains of Armenia, she lives in the mountains of Vermont, where she is on faculty at the University of Vermont’s College of Medicine.

Born in North Carolina, she holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania, and has lived in various locations such as New York and Yemen, residing now in Vermont. Once in state, she used stories and art to teach medical students at the University of Vermont’s College of Medicine.

Walrath is the author of the young adult novel-in-verse, “Like Water on Stone,” which details three children running from the Armenian genocide. Karen Hesse of the Newberry Medal described it as “a heartbreaking tale of familial love, blind trust, and the crushing of innocence. A fine and haunting work.” “Like Water on Stone” was a finalist for the inaugural Vermont Book Award.

Walrath will be reading selected poems, as well as discussing the Armenian Genocide with Brucken.

The Norwich Writers Series is produced by the College of Liberal Arts, the Department of English & Communications, and the Vermont Humanities. All Writers Series events are free and open to the public.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

 

Norwich University Liberal Arts Program Holds Town Hall Forums with Gubernatorial Candidates

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

February 25, 2016

Norwich University will launch “Vermont’s Tomorrow,” a series of town hall style open forums with gubernatorial candidates, beginning on March 3, 2016, with Democratic candidate Sue Minter.

The hour-long forums will be held in Cabot 85 from 4:30 – 5:30 p.m., followed by a short reception. Produced and moderated by Norwich students in the College of Liberal Arts, these events are open to the public and will be broadcast and can be livestreamed over Norwich’s radio station, WNUB-FM.

The focus of the Town Hall events is for Norwich students to ask their questions of the candidates on the issues most critical to them. Those issues range from jobs in Vermont and the Vermont economy to climate change, education and health care reform.

Here is the full schedule of appearances:

  • Thursday, March 3 – Democratic Candidate Sue Minter
  • Thursday, March 24 – Democratic Candidate Matt Dunne
  • Friday, April 1 – Republican Candidate Lt. Gov. Phil Scott
  • Thursday, April 28 – Republican Candidate Bruce Lisman

“With the launch of ‘Vermont’s Tomorrow,’ we aim to make Norwich the place for candidates seeking state or national level office to express their views on leadership and the future of our state and nation,” College of Liberal Arts Dean Andrea Talentino said.

“Vermont’s Tomorrow” is a part of the University’s “America’s Tomorrow” initiative, a student-guided program that explores U.S. Leadership in the 21st century, through interviews with military, business and political leaders. Podcasts of the interviews may be found on the University’s Peace and War Center’s website.

“These are exciting opportunities, implemented by students for students and the public at large,” Talentino said. “They showcase the strength of our engagement with policy makers, and Norwich’s laser-like focus on leadership at all levels,” she said.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich Professor Gregory Wight Named Vermont Engineer of the Year

Photograph of Norwich Professor Gregory Wight
Norwich University Office of Communications

February 1, 2016

Norwich University professor of engineering Gregory Wight, P.E., has been named Vermont’s 2016 Engineer of the Year by the Vermont Society of Professional Engineers.

A mechanical engineer, Prof. Wight is a recognized expert in air quality engineering. He has published numerous papers on the field and is the author of the widely-used textbook Fundamentals of Air Sampling. Educated at MIT and the University of Florida, he currently serves as the Charles A. Dana Professor of Engineering at Norwich, the university’s highest faculty honor.

Wight has previously served as an associate dean at Norwich and as the director of the university’s David Crawford School of Engineering.

Wight served four years in the Air Force following graduate school, starting as an Engineering Air Force Officer in the USAF Contract Management Division at the GE Jet Engine Facility in Evendale, Ohio. He later joined the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection six months after the passage of the Clean Air Act in 1971. Serving as a principal air quality engineer, he supervised a staff of six to inventory air pollutant emissions, model air quality, and design strategies to achieve the National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

Teaching Excellence

Wight has served on the Norwich University faculty since 1978. During that time, he has developed and taught nearly 33 different courses to young engineering students, receiving numerous honors in recognition of his outstanding teaching.

He has also served as a visiting professor of civil/environmental engineering at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado.

At Norwich, Wight has chaired three different engineering departments, served on numerous committees, and hired or helped hire the next generation of engineering faculty.

His many professional achievements include his participation in the Vermont Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project as researcher/writer, and heading the recent, successful year-long reaccreditation effort for NU’s David Crawford School of Engineering.

Public Service

In a press release announcing the award, the Vermont Society of Professional Engineers spotlighted Wight’s significant contributions to the engineering profession, noting the “outstanding education to hundreds of future engineers” Wight has provided, as well as his active involvement in MathCounts, FIRST Lego League, and Engineers without Borders.

Wight is a life member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a member of the Vermont Society of Engineers, the Tau Beta Pi national engineering honor society, and the American Society for Engineering Education.

He has also been active in many community organizations in Vermont, including town government, youth soccer, his local historical society, and the Central Vermont Runners Club.

Architecture + Art’s Lecture Series continues with “Designing Your Future: Creating Value in Your Career”

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

January 21, 2016

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art presents “Designing Your Future: Creating Value in Your Career,” with

Harry Falconer, Director of Experience and Education for the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB).

The lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 3, at noon in the Chaplin Hall Gallery. Falconer will discuss the process of becoming a licensed architect, which involves completing a thorough Intern Development Program (IDP) designed to expand the range of student experiences.

Since joining NCARB in April of 2006, Falconer has provided professional support to the IDP, becoming director in 2007, and other education-based programs hosted by NCARB.  He is also responsible for administering the Architect Licensing Advisors Community and the NCARB’s outreach initiatives to schools, conferences, and firms.

Falconer earned his Bachelor of Architecture degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. As an architect, Falconer has spent fifteen years working in architecture-engineering firms and seven years in facilities planning and design. He is a licensed architect in the state of Virginia, is certified as a construction documents technologist by the Construction Specifications Institute, and holds the NCARB Certificate. He is a member of the American Institute of Architects, and in 2010 he was awarded NCARB’s highest honor, the President’s Medal for Distinguished Service, for his leadership in the Intern Development Program (IDP).

The NU School of Architecture + Art Lecture Series is supported by a generous grant from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation. For more than 10 years, the Byrne Foundation has partnered with Norwich to bring eminent national and international architects, designers, artists, and writers to campus. Events are free and open to the public.

The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation is a philanthropic organization that supports cancer research, education, volunteerism, and other charitable endeavors.

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is the only National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited architecture school in northern New England.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu