Norwich Brings Leaders in Cybersecurity to Campus for Second Annual Summit

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Feb. 19, 2018

The second annual Norwich University Cyber Security Summit will take place on the Norwich University campus June 18-20, 2018. This event will bring together an international cadre of experts in the fields of information security and assurance, business, public administration and more to discuss the latest in federal cyber security policy, and the practical applications of cyber defense on state and local levels.

Mid- and executive-level managers seeking to broaden their organizations’ approaches to prudent cyber security practices will gain insight from a series of workshops and discussions on relevant issues facing the industry. Topics will include critical infrastructure protection; cybercrime; the dynamism of the open Internet and communication technologies; and the management of cyber programs. Registration for the Cyber Security Summit is now open; visit the event website to learn more.

The $650 cost of registration includes all meals and housing in dorms; or attendees can stay off campus and register for $550.

Taking place during Norwich University College of Graduate and Continuing Studies’ Residency Week, the 2018 Cyber Security Summit promises to be one of the week’s highlights.

Keynote speakers include:

Dr. Thomas Hyslip currently serves as the Resident Agent in Charge of the Department of Defense, Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS), Cyber Field Office, Eastern Resident Agency. Prior to joining the DCIS in 2007, he was a special agent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Criminal Investigation Division, and the U.S. Secret Service. Throughout his 17 years of federal law enforcement, he has specialized in cybercrime investigations and computer forensics. Hyslip is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves and has a mix of active duty and reserve assignments spanning over 20 years, including assignments with the Office of Inspector General, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Army Reserve Information Operations Command. In 2005, he deployed to Iraq with the 306th Military Police Battalion and earned a Bronze Star, Purple Heart, and Combat Action Badge.

Cheri Caddy leads a private-public cybersecurity program at the National Security Agency that engages stakeholders to cooperatively address technical and operational cyber risks of national security systems and critical infrastructure. Previously, Caddy served as Director for Cybersecurity Policy for the National Security Council, where she coordinated the cybersecurity efforts for members of the private sector, foreign partners, and federal and state governments. She has also held significant positions with the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the White House.

Working for the Department of Homeland Security, Dr. Billy Powers serves as a Senior Advisor for the National Protection & Programs Directorate (NPPD) Business Continuity & Emergency Preparedness (BCEP) division. In this role, he manages the implementation of individual and organizational preparedness policies within NPPD. Powers has served as a Professional Staff Member with the United States Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee (110th Congress) and was integral in crafting a comprehensive National Security Strategy to protect the United States in the event of natural disasters or acts of terrorism. He is a veteran of the United States Air Force, and holds numerous national certifications in areas related to emergency response.

Dr. Ruth Stilwell is the Executive Director of Aerospace Policy Solutions LLC, a core faculty member in Norwich University’s Master of Public Administration program, and a leading authority on integrated space and aviation policy and governance. Her work was recently published in the Journal of Space Safety Engineering. Stilwell’s numerous publications cover a wide range of topics in space and aviation, public safety, and industry reform, and have influenced key U.S. legislation. From 2010-2015, Stilwell served as the industry expert representing air traffic controllers on the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Air Navigation Commission in Montreal; she currently serves on the Technical Committee on Human Spaceflight Safety of the International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety, which is working to develop safety guidelines for human commercial spaceflight.

Stephen Creamer is the Director of the Air Navigation Bureau at the International Civil Aviation Organization. Creamer has held a number of executive and managerial positions at the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration with over 33 years’ experience in the Air Traffic and International Aviation organizations. Such roles include serving as FAA Regional Office Director for Europe, Africa and the Middle East; and serving as a member of the ICAO Air Navigation Commission. More recently, his work has focused on the international implementation of procedures and technology systems that improve aviation safety, with special attention paid to maintaining capacity and efficiency.

For more information on the 2018 Cyber Security Summit, and a full schedule of events, please visit the event website.

Ranked #2 by the Ponemon Institute for cyber security in the U.S., Norwich University programs are consistently ranked among the best in the nation for cyber security education. Norwich University is recognized as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and has received designation as a Center of Digital Forensics Academic Excellence (CDFAE) by the Defense Cyber Crime Center (DC3). Beginning in 2002, Norwich University became a member of what is now called National Science Foundation’s Cyber Corps: Scholarship for Service program. Norwich is partnered with the United States Army Reserves (USAR) to develop cyber-education curricula that align with federal standards and cybersecurity needs. Most recently Norwich’s online graduate program was named one of the top ten best cybersecurity graduate programs in the country by Universities.com.

Norwich is also home to GenCyber@NU, a National Security Agency and National Science Foundation-funded cybersecurity camp for high school students.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Norwich University’s College of Graduate and Continuing Studies (CGCS) builds upon the institution’s 198 year academic heritage with innovative online programs. CGCS offers master’s degrees in a variety of areas; bachelor’s degree completion programs; a certificate in teaching and learning and continuing education opportunities. The programs are recognized throughout the industry for their rigor, small class size, high student satisfaction and retention. online.norwich.edu

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich Museum Presents Historian on Partridge’s Rugged, Outdoor Lessons

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Feb. 15, 2018

Norwich University’s Sullivan Museum and History Center presents Norwich historian Dr. Gary Lord on “Norwich Pedestrian Excursions: Learning in the Field,” in a Lunch and Learn on Wednesday, Feb. 28 at noon.

The event, sponsored by the Sullivan Museum and History Center Associates, includes a light lunch and is free and open to the public.

When Captain Alden Partridge established his military academy in 1819 he introduced a highly innovative system of education that included field excursions as an integral part of the learning experience of his students. These “pedestrian excursions” not only challenged students to endure “hardship and fatigue” but provided opportunities to supplement classroom instruction with what Partridge called “practical and everyday knowledge of the world”–knowledge which “can never be derived from books.”

The field excursions undertaken by Partridge’s students extended to the mountains of Vermont and New Hampshire, westward along the Erie Canal to Niagara Falls, and southward as far as Washington, D.C. and Mount Vernon. These field trips provided students with valuable experiences in botany, mineralogy, surveying, engineering, military science, political economy, and history. Student participants observed factories, navy yards, arsenals, waterworks, canals, railroads, and bridges. They also visited legislative assemblies, museums, and historic sites.

Clearly, Alden Partridge was one of the very first American educators to grasp the pedagogical value of experiential learning and give it a prominent place in the curriculum of higher education.

Gary Lord is Emeritus Dana Professor of History at Norwich University. His fields of interest include American Colonial History and the Early U.S. Republic. Lord has a particular interest in the early 19th century educational reformer Alden Partridge who placed a high priority on experiential education and assigned it a prominent place in his innovative system of education. Lord has written extensively on Partridge and in 1981 led a group of Norwich and Dartmouth College students, along with a contingent of faculty, in a recreation of Partridge’s 1821 expedition to measure the height of Mount Washington.

The talk is held in conjunction with the Museum’s exhibit, “Explorers of Norwich: On Land and Sea,” which runs through June 30, 2018. The exhibition focuses on the stories of Norwich alumni who traversed the United States, the continents and the world to learn of new lands and opportunities on behalf of the still young United States. Also on display is “Discovering Mother Tongues: Writing, Place, and Identity.” This exhibit asks: what about the perspectives of those that explorers encountered? Each piece features text in a writing system on the verge of extinction, carved in wood from the region where that culture lives.  “Discovering Mother Tongues” is sponsored by Norwich University’s Academic Achievement Center, and the International Center.

Norwich University’s Sullivan Museum and History Center is the only museum in Vermont to be named a Smithsonian Affiliate. The museum is open to the public from 8 until 4 Monday through Friday, and on Saturdays from 11 to 4 during the academic year. Admission is free. For more information about the programs or exhibit, please call 802-485-2183 or visit http://academics.norwich.edu/museum.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin, M’17
Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich University’s Peace and War Center Presents Founder of Afghanistan’s Only Girls Boarding School

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Feb. 13, 2018

Norwich University’s Peace and War Center presents “Opportunities and challenges of establishing Afghanistan’s first and only all-girls boarding school” a presentation by Shabana Basij-Rasikh, School of Leadership, Afghanistan (SOLA) President & Co-Founder on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 12-1 p.m. in the Kreitzberg Library Todd Multipurpose Room.

This event is free and open to the public. For background, Basij-Rasikh’s TED talk about pursuing education under Taliban rule is available here.

Afghanistan has been embroiled in war for decades now, which has had a significant impact the life of women in the country, especially their education. Currently, only one in four girls receive a secondary education, which is due to the tremendous obstacles they face to attend school. The School of Leadership, Afghanistan (SOLA) is trying to address this by establishing the first and only all-girls boarding school in the country. Their mission is to provide Afghan girls a rigorous education that promotes critical thinking, a sense of purpose, and respect for self and others.

Since its establishment in 2008, SOLA students have represented 23 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces, they have sent more than 45 students to colleges and universities abroad, who have received more than 194 years’ worth of scholarships, valued at $9.4 million. Shabana Basij-Rasikh will tell the story of founding Afghanistan’s first and only all-girls boarding school and how she believes it is the key to establishing a peaceful, united and prosperous Afghanistan.

Born and raised in Kabul, Basij-Rasikh finished high school in the U.S. through the State Department’s Youth Exchange Studies program. She went on to attend Middlebury College in Vermont, graduating magna cum laude in International Studies and Women & Gender Studies in 2011. In 2016, she was awarded an honorary doctorate from SOAS University of London.

While at Middlebury, Basij-Rasikh was awarded a Davis Peace Prize—with which she built wells in the outskirts of Kabul—and was selected as one of Glamour Magazine’s Top 10 College Women of 2010. She also received the Vermont Campus Compact 2011 Madeleine Kunin Public Service Award for outstanding leadership and service to others.

While still in college, Basij-Rasikh co-founded SOLA—School of Leadership, Afghanistan, a nonprofit dedicated to giving young Afghans access to quality education abroad and jobs back home. After graduating from Middlebury, she returned to Kabul to turn SOLA into the nation’s first boarding school for girls. SOLA provides college preparatory courses to students aged 11-19 representing all major ethnic groups, religious sects, and tribes. It also helps graduates enter universities worldwide and return to substantive careers in Afghanistan, where they often become the first women to enter their fields.

During this period, Basij-Rasikh served as the National Gender Mainstreaming Advisor at the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development’s National Solidarity Program in Kabul, but left the position in 2012 to focus on SOLA full time. In addition to leading SOLA, Shabana’s advocacy work on the importance of educating girls takes her around the world. She is a global ambassador for Girl Rising, a call to action seeking investment in girls’ education worldwide. In recognition for her work, Basij-Rasikh was named one of National Geographic’s 2014 Emerging Explorers, and one of CNN International’s Leading Women of 2014.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin, M’17
Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich University Presents Award-Winning Real Estate and Community Developer Elinor Bacon of E.R. Bacon Development

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Feb. 5, 2018

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art continues its lecture series with Elinor Bacon, President, E.R. Bacon Development, who will discuss her experience in the world of real estate and community development in both the private and public sectors in a lecture at Chaplin Hall on Friday, February 23, at 4 p.m.

Sponsored by the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation, all lecture series events are free and open to the public. The School of Architecture + Art’s 2017-18 Lecture Series is themed: “Building Social Justice: Art as Activism.”

Elinor Bacon, the 2017 recipient of the prestigious American Institute of Architects D.C.- Washington Architectural Foundation Glenn Brown Award, has more than 35 years’ experience in housing, real estate and community development.

Currently, Bacon is a partner in the nationally acclaimed project, The Wharf, a mile-long stretch along the Washington Channel, Potomac River in Washington, D.C., developed with restaurants, retailers, residences, businesses and performance venues, led by PN Hoffman and Madison Marquette. In 2002, she formed E.R. Bacon Development, LLC, a real estate development and consulting firm that focuses on urban infill, mixed use, mixed income development, affordable housing and adaptive reuse of historic buildings. Beginning in 1997, Bacon served as Deputy Assistant Secretary at HUD, during the Clinton Administration. In 2001, Bacon launched the National Capital Revitalization Corporation, a quasi-public real estate development corporation established by the Washington D.C. Council, with the mission to spur economic development throughout the District.

Bacon studied at Bennington College, earned a bachelor’s degree from The New School for Social Research, New York City, and a master’s degree in Chinese Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. She is a member of the Urban Land Institute and the Congress for The New Urbanism. She is a member of the Montpelier Development Corporation Board of Directors since 2016, and served on the D.C. Historic Preservation Review Board.

The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation is a philanthropic organization that supports cancer research, education, volunteerism, and other charitable endeavors.

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is the only National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited architecture school in northern New England.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin, M’17
Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich University to Celebrate Completed Renovation of Historic Weather Bureau Building, Ainsworth Hall

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Jan. 31, 2018

Norwich University officials will celebrate on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, at 12:45 p.m. with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house, a complete renovation to one of the oldest buildings on campus, the College of Liberal Arts’ academic building, Ainsworth Hall.

The public is invited to join President Richard W. Schneider, along with Provost Dr. Sandra Affenito and College Dean Ted Kohn, Ph.D., who will give remarks and invite faculty back into the building after seven-and-a-half months of construction costing $4.8 million. Please RSVP here: https://alumni.norwich.edu/AinsworthRibbonCutting.

Ainsworth Hall houses faculty offices and classrooms for Norwich’s Peace and War Center as well as the departments of History and Political Science and Justice Studies and Sociology.

When the building was originally built in 1910, it was designated the U.S. Weather Bureau, Northfield Station, from which official weather data was reported to the federal government to be used in weather forecasting.

Norwich University recently installed a new weather station on the roof of Tompkins Hall to provide weather data to support research in high-performance weather forecasting and green stormwater infrastructure. Check local Northfield weather here: https://www.wunderground.com/weather/us/vt/northfield-center/KVTNORTH22.

This project is the second completed construction project undertaken as part of the $100 million Forging the Future campaign. The five-year campaign is timed to culminate during the university’s bicentennial in 2019 and is designed to enhance the university’s strong position as it steps into its third century of service to the nation.

Ainsworth Building Facts:

  • Complete Weatherization of the building, (energy cost savings and rebates from VEIC).
  • Additional 1810 gross square feet, creating a Mechanical room on the 3rd
  • Added a two-stop elevator.
  • A complete ADA and Life Safety upgrade, (lactation room).
  • New bathroom suites on every floor.
  • All new office furniture.
  • The new technology has been installed for presentation and multi-location teaching and conferencing.
  • Two rooms added to the campus scheduling system for multi-purpose.
  • The old south wing of Ainsworth was removed and replaced with new construction, employing the most modern building methods.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Public Event: Book Launch and Pop-Up Exhibit for “The Design-Build Studio: Crafting Meaningful Work in Architectural Education”

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Jan. 17, 2018

Norwich University will celebrate “The Design-Build Studio: Crafting Meaningful Work in Architectural Education,” a new book edited by Assistant Professor of Architecture Tolya Stonorov, with a reception on Wednesday, Jan. 31, at 4 p.m. at the Sullivan Museum and History Center Rotunda. Refreshments will be served.

The public is invited to this free event which includes a pop-up exhibit of Stonorov’s original drawings from the book. Other Norwich book contributors, Associate Professor Danny Sagan, Dean of the College of Professional Schools Aron Temkin, Adjunct Professor Steve Kredell and alumnus Dan Wheeler, 2015, will be on hand to sign books and discuss their contributions.

“The Design-Build Studio” examines 16 international community driven design-build case studies through process and product, with chapters on community involvement, digital and handcraft methodologies and a graphic Time Map. As a field guide to current trends in academic design-build studios, including Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art, the work offers a look into the different design-build processes and methodologies and how they can be used to transform communities.

Design-build supports the idea that building, making and designing are intrinsic to each other: knowledge of one strengthens and informs the expression of the other. Hands-on learning through the act of building what you design translates theories and ideas into real world experience. The work chronicled in this book reveals how this type of applied knowledge grounds us in the physicality of the world in which we live.

“The pedagogies and methodologies exhibited in ‘The Design-Build Studio’ embody the ethos of architecture education at Norwich, which is rooted in doing, but also in doing with purpose,” Stonorov said.

The book has received great praise since its recent publication. Bryan Bell, Executive Director of Design Corps, notes: “The Design-Build Studio is a deep dive into the methods and lessons of the important educational tool known as design-build. The content provides a thorough presentation of the state of the art, and allows the reader to compare and contrast the thinking and making of thirty of the outstanding leaders in the field. This book presents a learning opportunity that will allow us all to better define what works well, and move further forward in the evolution of this inclusive, pluralistic, and transformative teaching method.”

Clifford Curry, FAIA & Co-Founder of the Curry Stone Design Prize notes: “Stonorov advocates for a better architect – one that builds in a more complete way. The multi-faceted approach of building one’s designs with the added value of community contributions should be a required experience for every budding architect.”

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

 

U.S. Marine General to Speak at Norwich ROTC Commissioning Ceremony

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Jan. 11, 2018

Norwich University’s graduating future officers will hear remarks from a fellow alum at this spring’s joint services commissioning ceremony. U.S. Marine Lieutenant General John J. Broadmeadow ’83 returns to the Norwich campus to speak to ROTC commissioning officers during a formal ceremony to mark the occasion on Sunday, May 13, at 9 a.m.

In his address, the Marine officer will touch on themes of service to nation and the importance of a military commission.

Broadmeadow is the Deputy Commander of U.S. Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM), one of nine Unified Commands under the Department of Defense. USTRANSCOM is a global Combatant Command with functional responsibilities for air, land, and sea transportation for the Department of Defense, ultimately delivering national objectives on behalf of the President and Secretary of Defense.

Broadmeadow commissioned a Second Lieutenant in 1983 after graduating from Norwich University with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. His first operational assignment was as a Supply Officer with 9th Marine Amphibious

Brigade in Okinawa, Japan. He has served in a variety of command and staff billets in every element of the Marine Air Ground Task Force, at Headquarters Marine Corps, and on the Joint Staff. Notable staff billets include Prepositioning Officer for Plans, Policy and Operations at HQMC, the Assistant Chief of Staff (AC/S) N4 for Task Force 58 conducting the amphibious assault into Afghanistan following 9/11 and as the AC/S G-4 for 1st Marine Division during the attack to Baghdad in 2003 and the Division’s return to Iraq for stability operations in Al Anbar Province in 2004. He commanded 1st Supply Company in Somalia for Operation Restore Hope, Marine Wing Support Squadron 371 in Iraq for Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2005, and Combat Logistics Regiment 17. He was the Team Leader and Senior Advisor to the 7th Iraqi Infantry Division as it assumed responsibility for operations in Al Anbar Province Iraq in 2008 – 2009.

As a General Officer starting in 2009, LtGen Broadmeadow served as the Deputy Commanding General (CG) Marine Forces Pacific, Deputy Commander Joint Task Force 505 for Operation Tomodachi conducting tsunami relief in Japan, CG 1st Marine Logistics Group deploying to Helmand Province Afghanistan for Operation Enduring Freedom in 2011, CG 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade, CG Marine Corps Logistics Command, Vice Director Joint Staff J-4, and CG Marine Corps Installation Command.

Broadmeadow is a graduate of the USMC Amphibious Warfare School and Command and Staff College (non-resident programs), and a graduate of the U.S. Army War College in 2001. In addition to his bachelor’s degree from Norwich, he holds a dual Master of Arts in Business Administration and Computer Resources Management from Webster University, and a Master of Science in Strategic Studies from the U.S. Army War College.

At Norwich University’s May 13, 2018, joint services commissioning ceremony, Broadmeadow will address students commissioning into the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marines and their families. The event, which begins at 9 a.m. in Shapiro Field House, is part of Norwich University’s Commencement Weekend and is open to the public.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich to Host Annual FIRST® LEGO LEAGUE Vermont State Championship

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Dec. 4, 2017

Norwich University will host the annual FIRST LEGO League (FLL) Vermont State Championship on Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, in Shapiro Field House beginning at 9 a.m.

Founded by Segway inventor Dean Kamen, FIRST® LEGO® League is designed to inspire children in science and technology through the use of robotics. Open to 9 to 14-year-old students around the world, teams are tasked with researching a real-world scientific issue and designing and building an original robot.

Norwich University established the state’s regional FLL affiliate beginning in 2013 hosting regional qualifiers, and beginning in 2015 hosting the state championship event.

The Norwich event on Dec. 10 marks the third year of an independent FLL region in the state of Vermont. With 17 teams of up to 10 students each, along with coaches and parents, there will be much to see throughout the day, and spectators are encouraged to attend. Additionally, 6 Junior FLL teams comprised of elementary school-aged students will be exhibiting their work related to the challenge at an unofficial showcase during the event.

Using LEGO MINDSTORMS® technologies, student teams showcase the results of weeks of intense preparation as they deploy their robots to complete thematic challenges in autonomous robot matches. Teams connect with their local and global communities by using critical thinking, creativity, and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM ) concepts to create and present innovative solutions to real-world challenges.

This year’s theme is “Hydrodynamics” and focuses on how we find, transport, use, or dispose of water.

Events are scheduled throughout the day:

  • Pre-registered team arrival | 8:00 a.m.
  • Opening remarks | 9:00 a.m.
  • Judged events start | 9:40 a.m.
  • Robot matches start | 1:00 p.m.
  • Robot matches conclude | 3:30 p.m. (approximately)
  • Awards ceremony | 4:15 p.m. (approximately)

Spectators will also have the opportunity to see demos from Vermont high school robotics teams (FRC) at the competition. Starting at noon, spectators are welcome to visit the on-campus Sullivan Museum & History Center, the state’s only Smithsonian Affiliate, or they may visit water-themed engineering demonstrations in Norwich’s newly remodeled Carrara Family Engineering Lab. The schedule is approximate and subject to change.

Opening and closing ceremonies, as well as robot matches, take place at Shapiro Field House. Event highlights include team presentations to judges on their robot design choices and on their innovative solution to a water-themed community problem. Teams also complete challenges during the event to demonstrate their ability to work as a group—an important component of the competition.

While the robots often attract the most attention, a key aspect of the FLL program is its “Core Values” which, according to its website, “are among the fundamental elements that distinguish FLL from other programs of its kind. By embracing the Core Values, participants learn that friendly competition and mutual gain are not separate goals, and that helping one another is the foundation of teamwork.”

After teams check-in, Executive Director at Friends of the Winooski River (a local nonprofit dedicated to the preservation and protection of the Winooski River and its tributaries), Michele Braun, will give opening remarks at 9:00 a.m.

Team presentations begin at 9:40 a.m. and continue through 12:30 p.m. Robot matches begin at 1 p.m. and run throughout the remainder of the event. The day will conclude with an awards ceremony around 4:15 p.m.

For more information, contact the FLL team at FLL@norwich.edu, 802.485.2256.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, Norwich launched the Forging the Future campaign in 2014. The five-year campaign, which is timed to culminate in 2019, is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities and is designed to enhance the university’s strong position as it steps into its third century of service to the nation.

Media Contact:
Kathleen Murphy-Moriarty
Associate VP of Communications & Marketing
Office Tel: (802) 485-2292
kmurphym@norwich.edu

In Conversation: Former NYPD Commissioner Raymond Kelly

Photo: Two Norwich cadets interview former NYPD commissioner Raymond Kelly
Norwich University Office of Communications

November 27, 2017

Raymond Kelly led the New York City Police Department for 14 years under mayors David Dinkins and Michael Bloomberg, becoming the city’s longest-serving police commissioner while capping a 47-year NYPD career. Between appointments, Kelly oversaw policing in Haiti for the United Nations, worked for Interpol in Europe, and led the U.S. Customs Bureau. At the NYPD, he implemented many innovations, including the push to recruit police officers who speak 106 languages to serve one of the most diverse cities in the world. The counter-terrorism bureau he established at the NYPD in 2002 was the first of its kind for a metropolitan police force.

The author of the 2015 book, Vigilance: My Life Serving America and Protecting Its Empire City, Kelly visited the Norwich campus earlier this month to present the Fall 2017 Todd Lecture. During his visit, the former Marine and Vietnam War veteran sat down to talk about his life and career with Jess R. Hindman ’19 and John L. Smith ’18. Hailing from Mansfield, Mass., and Houston, Tex., respectively, the two Norwich cadets and criminal justice majors kicked off the conversation.

We’d like to ask you primarily about leadership, because that’s why we’re in the Corps and why we chose Norwich. Throughout your career, what’s been consistent in your leadership and management style?

Kelly: It’s a good question. I had three older brothers in the Marine Corps. They used to bring home their “72” gear, or field equipment, including a guide book for Marines. I probably saw this when I was 13. It’s been around since 1910. But they keep issuing new editions of it. It talks about leadership traits. The general principle is, “Hey, if you act like a leader, if you sound like a leader, if you do the things that good leaders do, you’re a leader.” Leaders are made. They’re not born. I sort of took that to heart.

Photo: Portrait of Raymond KellyThere are 14 leadership principles in that book. I have a Franklin Planner that I use. In one of the dividers, I have these 14 leadership traits. Obviously, you could write paragraphs, books, about each one of those things. But some of them are justice and judgment. How do you treat people who are working for you? What you ultimately want is respect from the people you work with. How do you get that respect? One of the ways you get it is by using these traits. There’s dependability, obviously integrity, decisiveness. There’s tact. There’s initiative, enthusiasm, bearing, unselfishness, courage, job knowledge, loyalty, and endurance. Now, if you look at all of those, and you try and emulate them as best you can, people are going to see you as a leader. Someone who they respect. That’s what I try to do. There’s certainly lots of challenges, in life, challenges as a leader. But it’s sort of worked for me. I know there’s a lot of different definitions of leadership. But I wanted to keep it simple in my head.

That is a little bit of my leadership secret. Also, I’m a hands-on leader. I’m not a micro-manager. But I am hands on. I want to do things that enable me to see what personnel are doing, let them know that I appreciate what they do. Also, you never want to become one of the boys or girls. A lot of people don’t realize that. There’s a price to pay for leadership. The expression, “It’s lonely at the top.” Yeah. It is—at every level. Again, you want that respect. If you are just one of the crowd and become sort of one of your subordinates, they’re not going to respect you. These are some of the things that I think work for me.

Taking counter-terrorism work as an example, you were able to effect great amounts of change in the NYPD. What would you say has been your most effective method for enacting that change and getting people to do what you want?

Photo: Norwich cadets interview Raymond KellyWell, let’s face it: The position of authority gives you the ability to affect change. Now the question is, is it lasting? Will people resist it? Will it somehow be undermined? Just having a position of authority enables you to initiate things. I think the respect element I talked about is what enables it to sort of take hold. You know, “This person is leading this effort. Because it’s this person, I think it has merit. I am buying into it.”

What are some ways that you’ve changed your leadership style over the years?

I think leadership to a certain degree is situational. It depends on what the work force looks like and what the immediate situation is. I think you need to be flexible in terms of how you approach it. If I have to use one word as to how I lead, I would probably say “authoritative.” I have that model because in an organization like the police department, you’ve got people working 24 hours a day. The department needs the structure, the people need that structure. I think in many things you have to have that authoritative style. But then there’s the coach, and then there’s the element of counseling people. So, depending on the situation you’ve got to be able to adjust to what you believe is the right leadership style. In an emergency situation, you have to use the authority that you have. People expect that. People want somebody in charge. You have to take that position. But you don’t have to go around flexing that all the time.

How have you dealt with people that didn’t like you or the decisions you’ve made and been able to move on?

You do just that—move on. I would say this, I did learn a lesson. I made a decision, and quite frankly I don’t remember what it was, but it had to do with constituencies. You have to think about the [ones] you have when making a decision. I made this decision that did not incorporate the union or the union position. You work with the public, the media, elected officials, the boss, the mayor, that sort of thing. I just didn’t think about the union. It came back to cause a problem.

Photo: Raymond Kelly stands with two Norwich cadets, holding challenge coin giftSo, I actually drew a decision wheel, and I put all these constituencies in it. “Did I think of this? Did I think of that?” So, I learned a lesson. If you have the time to do that, you want to use the capacity that you have to check in with people and see what their thoughts are. Sometimes you have to force your hand. But if you have the time and the opportunity, you check with your constituents.

Interview condensed and edited for length and clarity.

Produced, edited and photographed by Sean Markey

Norwich University President Richard W. Schneider Celebrated as Vermont’s Citizen of the Year

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Nov. 17, 2017

On Thursday, Nov. 16, over 200 friends, family and community members, and community partners gathered at Trader Duke’s Hotel in South Burlington to celebrate Norwich University President Richard W. Schneider as the Vermont Chamber of Commerce’s Citizen of the Year.

Schneider was selected by the Vermont Chamber of Commerce for the Citizen of the Year Award for his extensive community leadership and continual devotion to the betterment of Vermont.

In addition to the dinner celebration, the Vermont State House flew a Norwich University flag to honor President Schneider, who has served Norwich University as president for over 25 years and is one of the longest and continuously serving college or university presidents in the history of the nation. He has envisioned, inspired and engineered tremendous improvements in the university’s academic reputation, quality of faculty and facilities, and strength of athletic programs, creating strategies and programs for diverse student populations of Corps of Cadets and civilian students to excel.

The Norwich University campus has been transformed under President Schneider’s leadership. Among the physical gems Schneider has ushered in, a new library, academic halls, campus center, sports arenas, the Sullivan Museum and History Center, a Smithsonian Affiliate®, student residence halls, and renewable energy facilities. The physical growth of the institution under his leadership has had an immeasurable and positive impact on the economic, cultural, and social welfare of central Vermont, as well as the entire state.

“President Schneider is a gifted leader, an inspiration for community engagement, and an exemplary representation of the finest ideals of Vermont citizenship,” said Betsy Bishop, president of the Vermont Chamber of Commerce (pictured). “He represents the innovative spirit essential to inspiring students and faculty to tackle real-world challenges. We are honored to present this award to President Schneider.”

Recent recipients of the Citizen of the Year award include Bill Stritzler, Janette Bombardier, Stephen C. Terry, U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy, Antonio Pomerleau, and Governor James Douglas.

Schneider, Ph.D., was commissioned as an ensign in the Coast Guard and served eight years of active duty, including a tour in Vietnam and served 30 years of both active and reserve duty, retiring in 1998 as a Rear Admiral. Schneider’s military awards include the Coast Guard Distinguished Service Medal, Coast Guard Meritorious Service Medal, Coast Guard Commendation Medal with Gold Star, Navy Commendation Medal, and numerous campaign decorations for service in Vietnam.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, Norwich launched the Forging the Future campaign in 2014. The five-year campaign, which is timed to culminate in 2019, is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities and is designed to enhance the university’s strong position as it steps into its third century of service to the nation.

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu