Grants to Fund Pervious Concrete, Green Stormwater Solutions Research

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – A way to turn stormwater runoff into drinking water will be investigated in one of two recently awarded research grants to the David Crawford School of Engineering at Norwich University.

Both grant projects are overseen by Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering Tara Kulkarni.

Kulkarni earned a pilot grant that funds her collaboration with a student research project led by senior civil engineering student Susan Limberg. Kulkarni, as the faculty adviser, wrote a proposal based on Limberg’s idea of developing pervious concrete filters to control stormwater runoff. One compelling component to their project is a filtration process aimed at transforming rainwater into drinkable water.

They received a Phase I, $14,957 grant from the P3: People, Prosperity and the Planet Student Design Competition for Sustainability, a national-level competition offered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Limberg serves as a cadet first lieutenant, executive officer of Drill Company in the Norwich University Corps of Cadets and as president of the NU Society of Women Engineers. Working with Prof. Kulkarni as her advisor, Limberg will study the filtration component of the stormwater runoff project as part of her senior honors thesis. Norwich faculty who study economics and sociology are also supporting her research.

Meanwhile, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering Kulkarni has received a $9,917 pilot project grant of her own via the University of Vermont’s National Science Foundation EPSCoR program.

The Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) is designed to fulfill the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) mandate to promote scientific progress nationwide.

Last month Kulkarni began work on her project, which aims to design a suitable model for Green Infrastructure/Low Impact Development (GI/LID) projects to manage stormwater in Vermont watersheds.

Her research is investigating stormwater issues across the Winooski River watershed with a special focus on Montpelier.

The research will involve undergraduate students at Norwich and engage two undergraduate classrooms in stormwater quality assessment and modeling related activities. In addition, K-12 students in four Vermont schools in Montpelier, Burlington, St. Johnsbury, and Williamstown as well as local area Girl Scouts groups will participate in water resource management and green infrastructure related activities as part of a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) educational outreach effort.

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Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.

Norwich University Writers Series Presents “Unschooling” Author Ben Hewitt

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University’s Fall 2014 Writers Series kicks off with Vermont author Ben Hewitt on Thursday, Oct. 16 at 4 p.m. in the Kreitzberg Library Multipurpose Room.

Hewitt will read from his latest book, “Home Grown: Adventures in Parenting Off the Beaten Path, Unschooling, and Reconnecting with the Natural World.” The book is a meditation on childhood, learning and nature, and his experience raising two sons on his family’s 40-acre Vermont farm.

The book draws upon Hewitt’s own unconventional educational path. Raised in a two-room cabin on his family’s 160-acre homestead, Hewitt dropped out of high school at the age of 16 to pursue a “self-designed study program in excessively loud heavy metal music and extreme partying.”

In his 20s, he began writing for major national magazines as a full-time freelance journalist. His journalism has appeared in National Geographic Adventure, Outside, Wired, Discover, Yankee, and the New York Times Magazine, among other outlets.

Hewitt’s three previous books, “Making Supper Safe,” “The Town that Food Saved,” and “Saved,” also address our connection with nature through the lenses of healthy, sustainable and locally sourced food and intentional, simple lifestyles.

The October author reading at Norwich continues the university’s Writers Series, now in its third academic year, which is presented by the College of Liberal Arts and the Department of English and Communications.

All events in this series are free and open to the public. Hewitt’s books will be available for sale, and a signing will follow the reading.

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Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu

News Release: Norwich University bell concerts kick off July 5

For immediate release

By Jacque Day | Norwich University Office of Communications             [button href=”#” title=”Media Resources” target=”blank” shape=”square” size=”small” icon_only=”true” info=”popover” info_place=”right” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=”One photo and one audio clip is available with this story.”] Media Downloads[/button]

June 30, 2014

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Bring a picnic and a lawn chair to the Upper Parade Ground on the beautiful campus of Norwich University and enjoy free afternoon outdoor concerts performed on the Charlotte Nichols Greene Memorial Carillon.

[pullquote cite=”Carillon Fun Fact” type=”left, right”]The largest bell in a carillon plays the lowest note and is called the “bourdon.” Norwich’s bourdon is four feet in diameter and weighs 3,500 pounds.[/pullquote]Concerts will be held rain or shine on five consecutive Saturdays from July 5 to August 2, and all concerts begin at 1 p.m. Each original, hour-long performance will be followed by a demonstration and an opportunity to tour the bell tower.

Programs highlight a variety of classical, folk, traditional, and contemporary compositions.

The largest musical instruments in the world, carillons are played with both hands and feet. Musicians perform by striking levers stoutly wired to the various clappers of a tower’s many bells. Norwich’s carillon, one of only two such instruments in the state of Vermont, comprises 47 bells, the largest of which weighs 3,500 pounds.

2014 Carillon Concert Schedule

July 5: George Matthew Jr. (Middlebury College and Norwich University)

July 12: Amy Heebner (Albany, N.Y.)

July 19: Elena Sadina and Sergei Gratchev (Belgian Carillon School) perform as a duo

July 26: Elena Sadina and Sergei Gratchev (Belgian Carillon School) perform individually

August 2: Tatiana Lukyanova (New Britain, Conn.)

Fun facts about carillons:

  • The art of bell-tuning was perfected in northern Belgium in the 15th century. Norwich’s bells were cast and tuned at foundries in Belgium and France.
  • Every carillon has a name. Norwich’s is called the Charlotte Nichols Greene Memorial Carillon.
  • To be considered a “true” carillon, the instrument must have at least 23 bells. Norwich’s original carillon had 36 bells, and in 1959 it was expanded to 47.
  • The largest bell in a carillon plays the lowest note and is called the “bourdon.” Norwich’s bourdon is four feet in diameter and weighs 3,500 pounds.

For more information about the concert series, contact Jacque Day at jday1@norwich.edu, (802) 485-3329 or (802) 661-4012.

Media Contact

Daphne Larkin
Norwich University Assistant Director of Communications

dlarkin@norwich.edu
Office: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613.

Follow us on Twitter @NorwichNews

Norwich University Oral History Project Seeks Participants

For immediate release

By Daphne Larkin | Norwich University Office of Communications        [button href=”#” title=”Media Resources” target=”blank” shape=”square” size=”small” icon_only=”true” info=”popover” info_place=”right” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=”Two photos and one audio clip is available for this story.”] Media Downloads[/button]

June 26, 2014

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – After a successful inaugural year, an oral history project at Norwich University that collects spoken histories from the Norwich community invites more participants, including alumni, Northfield residents, university supporters and past and present employees to share their stories.

[pullquote cite=”Jennifer Payne, Norwich Voices Oral History Project Coordinator” type=”right”]“We want to preserve history in the voice of those who have lived it.”[/pullquote]

The Norwich Voices Oral History Project at the Sullivan Museum and History Center is a three-year pilot project to collect and preserve the stories of the Norwich community. The theme is the training of the citizen-soldier, and particular attention will be paid to stories of service and leadership woven through the reminiscences. Funded through the generosity of the Tawani Foundation (Chicago, IL), the project runs until 2017.

Interviews will be transcribed, cataloged, and indexed for accessibility using best practices and standards of the Oral History Association. Interview titles will be entered into the Kreitzberg Library catalog, which shares information with other libraries around the world. Researchers will have access to recordings through the museum and ultimately through our website using new searchable-speech technology.

“We want to preserve history in the voice of those who have lived it,” said Jennifer Payne, the project’s coordinator. “The most valuable contribution a person can leave for the future is their story. People have long used storytelling to transmit information and values within a culture’s heritage to the next generation.”

The scope of the project is broad. “We have stories from a 1934 graduate who trained on horseback,” Payne added, “and a Ranger from the class of 2005 who handled communications for Air Force One.”

Future plans include web access as allowed by participants and interactive indexing of the histories through a partnership with the University of Kentucky’s Louie B. Nunn’s Center for Oral History.

How to Participate

People interested in sharing their story may nominate themselves or another person through the museum’s website (http://academics.norwich.edu/museum/initiatives/) at or by contacting Jennifer Payne at 802-485-2379.

Selected participants will be scheduled for an interview that takes about an hour. Interviews can be conducted at an on-campus studio or within a 250-mile radius. They will receive interview questions ahead of time and can review and edit their transcribed interview before it becomes a permanent resource. Participants receive a copy of their recording and retain copyright of their story for their lifetime. Participants have input into the usage of their recording.

Media contact:

Daphne Larkin
dlarkin@norwich.edu
(802) 485-2886
(802) 595-3613 (mobile)

Follow us on Twitter @NorwichNews

Norwich University Names New Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations

By Daphne Larkin                                         [button type=”flat” button href=”#” title=”Media Resources” target=”blank” shape=”square” size=”small” icon_only=”true” info=”popover” info_place=”right” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=”One photo is available with this story.”] Download Photos [icon type=”download”] [/button]

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Bridget Wiffin, of Barre, has been named the new director of corporate and foundation relations for Norwich University.

[pullquote cite=”Bridget Wiffin, Norwich University Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations” type=”right”]“This is an exciting time to be joining the university, and I feel honored to be a part of the development team.”[/pullquote]

Wiffin graduated from SUNY Oswego in 2001 with a B.A. degree in English Writing Arts and has 13 years of professional writing and editing experience for various publications, including medical journals and outdoor sports magazines.

She comes to Norwich from the Vermont Foodbank, where she served as grants manager for nearly six years and was responsible for managing relationships with 40 to 50 private and corporate foundations, as well as government funding sources.

“I am looking forward to strengthening Norwich University’s existing relationships with foundation and corporate supporters in Vermont and nationally, and to exploring new connections within the philanthropic community that will help the university reach its goals and continue to transform the lives of thousands of young men and women,” Wiffin said. “This is an exciting time to be joining the university, and I feel honored to be a part of the development team.”

Media Resources

For more information on this story, contact Norwich University Assistant Director of Communications Daphne Larkin: dlarkin@norwich.edu, office: (802) 485-2886, mobile: (802) 595-3613.

GEN Gordon R. Sullivan to Discuss Climate Change in Spring Todd Lecture

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University continues its Todd Lecture Series this spring with “National Security Implications of Climate Change,’’ a presentation by former Army Chief of Staff, General Gordon R. Sullivan on February 5, 2015, at 7 p.m. in Plumley Armory.

Sullivan served as the 32nd Army Chief of Staff under President Bill Clinton. In the post, the four star general helped reengineer and downsize the US Army in the wake of the Cold War, leading it into the Information Age while facing a 40 percent budget cut.

Sullivan is the president and chief executive officer of the Association of the United States Army, headquartered in Arlington, Va.

Sullivan received a bachelor of arts in political science from Norwich University and commissioned as a US Army second lieutenant of Armor in 1959. He served two tours in Vietnam and is the recipient of the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Legion of Merit and the Army Distinguished Service Medal. Sullivan retired from the Army in 1995 after more than 36 years of active service.

Sullivan currently serves as the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Norwich University and the Marshall Legacy Institute. He holds positions on the MITRE Army Advisory Board, the MIT Lincoln Labs Advisory Board, the CNA Military Advisory Board and as a Life Trustee of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.

During his Feb. 5 lecture, Sullivan will discuss two studies published in recent years that draw conclusions about the threat of climate change to national security including its role as a threat multiplier for instability in volatile parts of the world and its interrelationship with national security and energy dependence. This lecture is hosted by the College of National Services.

Norwich University’s Todd Lecture Series is named in honor of Army Maj. Gen. Russell Todd (USA Ret.) and his wife, Carol, in gratitude for their dedicated service to the university. Todd ’50, serves as Norwich President Emeritus. With this series, Norwich brings the nation’s foremost thought leaders from the worlds of business, politics, the arts, science, the military and other disciplines to campus. All events are free and open to the public.

For more information please check the Todd Lecture Series website or call (802) 485-2633.