What I Do: NASA Manager Dennis Davidson ’82

Photo: Formal head and shoulders studio portrait of Norwich alum and NASA manager Dennis Davidson
WHAT I DO:

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Dennis Davidson ’82
Manager, Program Control and Integration Office

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NASA Commercial Crew Program
Johnson Space Center

Mention NASA and most people think of astronauts and engineers. But any space program “starts with the budget,” says Norwich alum Dennis Davidson. “Without money, nothing’s gonna happen.” During the Shuttle era, Davidson was the no. 2 in charge of business operations for the $4 billion-a-year program. Today he manages 35 staffers and an annual budget of $1.2 billion for NASA’s crewed space flight program. The program’s main thrust is vehicle development contracts with commercial aerospace companies Space X and Boeing to send astronauts to the International Space Station and on other low-Earth orbit missions. He started his de facto NASA career shortly after his NU graduation, working for five years at Johnson Space Center while wearing an Air Force uniform. Thirty years on, he helps navigate Congress’s stopgap continuing budget resolutions to keep agency missions aiming for the heavens.

What’s your job at NASA?
In government lingo, program control is all the business functions. It’s procurement and contracting. It’s the finances. It’s IT. It’s security. Public relations. Legislative affairs. Interfacing with the center legal offices. We have a lot of oversight committees, seven or eight, including an aerospace safety advisory panel. It’s also about keeping the money flowing from fiscal year to fiscal year, so that the astronauts and engineers can go do their jobs and the contracts can perform.

Are you the top guy?
I am.

What’s it like to work at NASA? Any highlights?
There was a point in my career where I had an office in the same building as Mission Control. So being there every day, walking past Mission Control Center, being aware of that history. “Houston, we’ve got a problem” from Apollo 13. Or “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” That all those words came to Houston first. Being a part of that going forward was just huge.

The second piece is just the quality of the workforce down here. I mean you come in every day and work with just awesome people, who are fun to be around, smart, [and] solving hard, hard problems every day. Being in a position to participate and at times just observe and see that take place has just been fascinating.

I’ve moved around to several different jobs. But I was in the Shuttle Program for the last few years that we were flying. Being a part of those last few missions, when you knew STS-133, STS-134, STS-135 were almost at the end. We finished assembling the Space Station. We were not going to fly these vehicles anymore. These were the last flights. Just knowing the importance of what was going on at that point in time and being a part of it.

What do you see when you look at the space exploration landscape today?
NASA on the whole is still doing in-house development for deep space exploration. Whether it’s the robotic spacecraft that are currently operating on Mars or the Orion crewed vehicle that’s being developed here that will be capable of going to the moon or to Mars. There’s also a new NASA rocket, called the SLS, the space launch system, that’s going to take the Orion into space.

What we’re starting to do commercially is operating in what we refer to as low-Earth orbit, so up to 250 to 300 miles. Primarily that’s the International Space Station. We’ve got three vehicles that they’re working on for cargo. Two of them are operational already. Then we’re working on the two vehicles with Boeing and Space X for crewed transportation, getting us away from reliance on the Russians. The big focus outside of NASA, a lot of it is what they call the tourist industry. Those folks would take passengers up to space, but not for long.

What’s driving advances in your field and what are the big hurdles?
The big hurdle is the cost of getting things launched. A couple of companies are working on reusable launch vehicles. It’s the single use vehicle—you got to build a new one every time—that drives the cost. With Shuttle, it was a multiuse vehicle. But because of the nature of it’s design, it was almost as expensive. So finding a reusable way [to launch]. Both Blue Origin and Space X have working concepts to land their first stage rocket. They do the launch. They bring it back. They can actually fly it back and land it on landing legs, where you then refuel it and use it again. That will be the biggest single thing that will open up the market.

Why does exploring space matter?
The simple answer is, what if Columbus never had a desire to set sail for India? What if Lewis and Clark had never set out to see all the country of the Louisiana Purchase? What if those people had never done that? What would we have missed out on? We’re taking the human race into that next unknown. Will we ever colonize another planet? Maybe. [We’re taking] that next step. Asking, is it possible? Could we colonize another body—the moon, Mars, or anywhere else—if we needed to?

Dennis Davidson serves on the Board of Fellows advisory panel for the Norwich University College of Science and Mathematics.

Norwich University Office of Communications

September 14, 2016

Norwich University to welcome thousands back to campus and launch the “Year of Leadership” at Homecoming

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Sept. 14, 2016

Norwich University will host several thousand alumni and guests during annual Homecoming festivities Sept. 16-18 and kick off the “Year of Leadership,” year three in the five-year, $100 million campaign called “Forging the Future.”

During the Saturday, Sept. 17 “All Class Partridge Society Luncheon and Year of Leadership Launch,” alumni will hear from several students who exemplify leadership in various ways, and President Richard W. Schneider will announce campaign progress to date.

Highlights of Homecoming 2016:

Friday, September 16

  • 2-5 p.m. The School of Architecture + Art will host an art show of work for sale by current students in the Chaplin Hall Gallery.
  • 2-4 p.m. The School of Architecture + Art offers tours of the completed solar-powered tiny house for sale, called CASA. The CASA house was designed and built by Norwich architecture and construction management students.
  • 3-3:45 Harmon Wall and Valor Plaque Ceremony in White Memorial Chapel.

Saturday, September 17

  • 9:30 a.m. Alumni Parade with NU Corps of Cadets review, on Sabine Field. Watch it on live-stream here.
  • Beginning at 11 a.m. Six out of eight NU fall sports teams have games at home; check the schedule here.
  • 1:40 p.m. Corps of Cadets Football March-On, Haynes Family Stadium at Sabine Field, to begin the football game against Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI).

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich Commencement | The Graduates: Phung Pham ’16

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Phung Pham ’16

Hometown: Hanover, Mass.
Major: Computer Security & Information Assurance (CSIA)
Student Path: Corps of Cadets
Activities:

  • Association for Computing Machinery (Student Club)
  • Coaching for Leadership
  • Center for Civic Engagement

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What Norwich Taught Me

Time management and an unwavering focus on academics. Pham spent countless hours studying in Kreitzberg Library and talking to professors outside of class to understand course material. “This is not [an] easy habit for everyone,” he says. “The Norwich motto “I Will Try!” [was] always in my mind. It helped me overcome problems.”[/content_band]

Phung Pham entered Norwich University’s Class of 2016 just two years after arriving in the U.S. from Vietnam. Pham participated in the inaugural Coaching for Leadership program at Norwich as a first-year Rook. There, he met NU alum and former trustee Richard Hayden ’68. Hayden advised Pham to focus on his academics, improve his English, seek leadership opportunities in the Corps, and become a U.S. citizen. In November, Pham realized all of those goals as he took the U.S. Oath of Allegiance, the final step in becoming an American citizen.

“Phung is an example of the best that Norwich can produce,” Hayden writes. “He will be a great alum and, I expect, an even greater American.”

A member of the Vermont National Guard, Pham returns to Fort Benning, Ga., following graduation to complete seven weeks of U.S. Army Advanced Individual Training. Upon completion, Pham hopes to join the U.S. Coast Guard via its direct commission program. He also plans to continue his education at Norwich. He was recently awarded a full scholarship for an online master’s degree with NU’s College of Graduate and Continuing Studies.

Norwich Commencement | The Speeches: MG John W. Baker’s ’85 Commissioning Address

Photo of Maj. Gen. John Baker ' 85 speaking to Norwich ROTC commissioning officers on the Norwich campus

On Sunday, May 15, 2016, Norwich alum and U.S. Army Major General John W. Baker ’85 addressed ROTC commissioning officers from the Class of 2016 at the formal Norwich commissioning ceremony. Baker, who serves as Commanding General of the Army’s 7thth Signal Command (Theater), shared the following copy of his prepared remarks.

Alan, Thank you for your kind introduction. General Sullivan, sir, it’s always good to be with you. Thanks for your service. Lieutenant General Valcourt, good to see you sir and all the other general and flag officers, welcome.

So, good morning, Rooks! Just kidding! Thought you might like to hear that word one last time! Although you know that in the military Second Lieutenant and Ensign are just other words for “Rooks!” But seriously, good morning team mates. Let me start by thanking Admiral Schneider for inviting me to speak. It is an honor to be present with the faculty, future officers, and families from Norwich – my alma mater! Thanks also to professors of military science, COL Eric Brigham, COL Andrew Hird, and COL Robert Kuckuk and their spouses Vicki, Alicia, and Jennifer, as well as the other ROTC officers and NCOs for leading our future officers! I would also like to thank everyone that has made this occasion possible today and for the warm reception that my wife, Laurie and I have received upon returning to “The Hill”. And, the Norwich Band, give it up for the toobies! The Honor Guard and Salute Battery!

You know, my dad brought me to Norwich in the fall of 1980 during my senior year of high school. My dad served in the Army for over 31 years; enlisted at 18 and was commissioned at 19 through Officer Candidate School. He was a tough artilleryman. Over the years of his career he met many Norwich graduates in the Army.

When I told him I’d like to go to a school up north where I could ski, play lacrosse, and wanted to participate in ROTC, he immediately said “Norwich!” We came up, toured the school; I stayed the night in Alumni Hall with some lacrosse players and the rest was history! Norwich is the only college I applied to, and maybe the only one I could get into! I knew this was the place for me at first sight.

I’m assuming that many of you, by your presence here today, share that same experience.

I’m not sure what the secret sauce of future success is, but Norwich has it in abundance! In part, it’s the sports and coaches. Back in my day, I played lacrosse at Norwich. Our coach when I was here was a legend. Coach Wallace “MAJ” Baines! MAJ started the lacrosse program here in 1968 and is in the Norwich University hall of fame. He was a “technician” of the sport, knew its complexity and intricacies. But he also knew the human dimension of building a team, of teamwork, of relationships, and bringing out the best in his players.

We all loved the sport, we all loved our team and teammates, and we all loved “MAJ” and HE…WAS…TOUGH! How tough? Chuck Norris tough! He dipped; you know, he chewed tobacco. Always had a chew of tobacco in his mouth. Problem was, we never, ever, saw him spit! Think about that. He would just smirk at the players who chewed and spit! We just figured “MAJ” had a cast iron stomach! I’m sure there’s a “MAJ” in your stay here at Norwich, too! You’ll remember this person fondly.

My own commissioning ceremony at Norwich was 31 years ago this month on 17 May 1985. General John W. Vessey Jr., the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was the commissioning officer. My experiences at Norwich shaped me into a leader as I entered the Army as an Armor Officer. The tough academics, varsity lacrosse team experiences, hundreds of hours on the national ski patrol on Paine Mountain, and four years in the Corps of Cadets all intersected to help prepare me for a lifetime of service. And for the last three decades, the leadership crucible of life at “The Wick” and ROTC training that are the key ingredients of the Norwich experience have been my foundation. You are all many steps ahead of your contemporaries from other colleges and universities as you enter your respective services. And you, too, will find your time at Norwich is the foundation from which you will grow and succeed in our profession of arms. It’s like the face-off in a lacrosse game, because I was a middy and I took all the face-offs. The face-off winner is the quickest and the one with the most agility. And just like in a face-off, you will find during your time at Norwich that the agility of thought and the speed of decision-making you have learned here for four years will give you an early edge as you come into our military. So use it and go!

Allow me to be one of the first to congratulate all 129 of you, whom we are about to commission as Second Lieutenants and Ensigns into this great military of ours! I know that you have worked hard and are prepared to take on leading America’s best young men and women; starting in about ten minutes!

Now my remarks this morning are peppered with anecdotes and insights gleaned from many years of service. Here is the first of them: “You are never too senior to be the junior.”

Let me explain. During a recent training exercise, a newly commissioned Lieutenant was driving down a muddy back road and encountered “me.” I was driving another tactical vehicle. Unfortunately, the vehicle was stuck in the mud and I mean stuck!

This very polite and eager Lieutenant got out of his vehicle and came over to me and said:
“Your vehicle stuck, Sir?”

“Nope,” I replied as I smiled and handed him the keys, “Yours is”!

In addition to my anecdotes, if you don’t take anything else out of what I will talk about this morning, then understand my remarks are about honor, courage, and service. This is what our military and Nation needs of you. This is what your fellow Soldiers, Marines, Sailors and Airmen expect of you. Our men and women in uniform ask so little of us as leaders; only to be well led by Officers of the highest character.

And, we are going to give you the opportunity to lead. The enlisted men and women that you lead and the country that you serve deserve nothing less than your best, every minute, every hour, every day that you wear the uniforms of our country. And you will lead, in good times and in the fog, friction, and uncertainty of combat.

For all of you digital natives using your mobile devices to Instagram, Skype, Snapchat, Vine, or Tweet my speech, I’ve placed the full text of my remarks on my command’s Facebook page and you can read it later. But here in this moment, as you are about to be commissioned, hear this: You will be looked at for leadership among the people that you serve — your platoon, your flight, your ship’s division, your team! They don’t want to be your friend, but it’s ok if you were friendly. They expect a human being, not a machine. But they also expect a leader. They want somebody to stand up and show them the way. That’s what we’ve trained you to do here at Norwich; show them the way!

Next, you need to guard your integrity! No one can take your integrity from you. People can take a lot of things from you, but nobody can take away your integrity. This attribute is uniquely yours; to maintain and guard. And, it will be challenged. But, your integrity, the ability to always demand, tell and insist on the truth, to always come forward and deal with the facts, is the foundation of our military profession. We must believe what people tell us as our lives depend on the highest integrity.

Your allegiance, when you take the oath momentarily, your allegiance is to our military – and your respective service! Remember, the absolute allegiance of what you’re about is to the institution of our military. Remember that every day of your service!

Be kind to those our nation asks you to serve! Treat everyone with dignity and respect, because no one in our military is unimportant. We can’t afford to have Soldiers, Marines, Sailors, and Airmen who are unimportant. Each member of our team has a critical part. We need to treat everybody with dignity and respect and the understanding that your life — your life — depends on them, and their lives depend on you.

And, you have to learn to trust your fellow Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen! You have never had to trust in someone as much as you’re going to have to trust the men and women of our military. You will weave a tapestry of trust – an unseen but very real bond that unites us. This is a very unique part of our profession.

Learn your service history! Everything that you are wearing today, your coats, your pants, the rank insignias, the branch insignias, is all built on a heritage and a legacy and it has a reason for being a certain color, shape, or style. Learn it and you’ll understand its importance. It defines who you are as an officer of our military and who you will be as a representative of our profession.

Always remember to wear hearing protection! Everything in our military is really loud: tank main gun rounds, jets, helicopter rotors, machine guns, bugles at revile, and tough Non-commissioned Officers and Chief Petty Officers. Protect your hearing so you can hear your wife or husband telling you to take the trash out, your children’s laughter, or your daughters telling you NO when you give them a curfew decades from now.

Let me end with something bigger than ourselves – I’m referring to the core values that are common to us all whether you serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force or Marines.

Serve with Honor: Conduct yourselves in the highest ethical manner. Be honest and truthful; Be accountable through your honorable professional conduct.

Serve with Courage: Courage is the value that gives us the moral and mental strength to do what is right; and always in the service of our country.

Commit to Service: Have a sense of service before self; realize your needs are secondary to the needs of those you lead.

Ok, we’re almost done, stay with me now. This bit of advice is very, very important. I want you to call, Skype, text, or write your mother once a week. No one has more unconditional love for you than your Mom. Pay it back with frequent contact.

Last thing! We’re doing this by row; like a tactical engagement officers. I want our soon to be officers to stand up and point to the family members that got you here today. That’s an order! Families, you’re the friendlies; help your officers. Make eye contact, identify your location, yell, shout, let them know how much you appreciate them, love them and thank them! Sit back down once you see them!

Family members and friends, STAND UP, yell back. That’s a request! Make eye contact. Shout to your sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, grandsons and granddaughters, nieces and nephews, how absolutely proud you are of them. Don’t sit down until you see your officer. And remember this moment!

One last insight; this one is about the importance of timeliness, because in our military it’s all about being on time.

There was a retired Officer who landed a civilian job in a fortune 500 company. During his first week, he came in about five minutes late over a couple of days, which irritated his Boss. During his second week he came in about ten minutes late every other day to the “exasperation” of his boss. During his third week he was a half hour late; every day.

His boss couldn’t take it anymore and called him into his office and berated him for always being late. “What did they tell you when you were late in the military??” the Boss asked. The retired Officer replied, “GOOD MORNING GENERAL…”

Again, thank you very much for inviting me here this morning; it’s a true honor.

To my officers…..
Please look at me…..
You’re in the 1% now! The 1% who have volunteered to serve our nation in the military.

Now, Go out and make a difference! Lead from the front! Be the Officers that our nation needs to shape and mold our military.

And, as we say in the Army’s Signal Regiment, I’ll see you on the high ground.

God bless our Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Airmen, Civilians, and our Families;

And may God bless the United States of America.

Ideas @ Work: #33 Washington Policy Week

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Now entering its third year, Washington Policy Week brings students in Professor Dart Thalman’s U.S. Security Policy and the Private Sector course to the nation’s capital for a weeklong capstone event. In previous years, students have paid high-level visits to the White House, the FBI, the Pentagon, Capitol Hill, and leading private-sector firms and nonprofits. D.C. activities are coordinated by Thalman and an energetic group of distinguished Norwich alumni led by NU Board of Fellows representative Jon Allen ’94 of Booz Allen Hamilton.

College of Liberal Arts Dean Andrea Talentino describes Washington Policy Week as a “great idea.” She adds that Norwich students who participate or attend similar workshops and events, such as the Foreign Policy Association meeting, West Point’s Student Conference on U.S. Affairs, or the St. Anselm program for Women’s Leadership, “come back saying they changed their lives.” You can read more about Washington Policy Week in the Norwich 2014–2015 Annual Report (PDF) in the fall 2015 issue of the Norwich Record.

More Ideas@Work:

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Ideas @ Work: #32 Sparkling Tree Water

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

On Arbor Day last year, Asarasi CEO and NU alum Adam Lazar M’06 debuted Sparkling Tree Water, his first in a line of planned beverages produced from maple trees. The lightly carbonated, filtered water represents a tiny portion of the estimated 500 million gallons of water that is a by-product of New England and Canada’s maple sugaring industry. In an interview with Innovation Destination: Hartford, Lazar described his start-up as an impact-focused business. “We are impacting water conservation [and] creating value-added products to the maple farming communities of North America.”

More Ideas@Work:

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Ideas @ Work: #16 Valor Ale

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.

The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Putting yeast, hops, barley, and water to work for a good cause, Norwich alum and Afghanistan War veteran Steve Gagner ’03 brews his standout Valor Ale at his rapidly growing 14th Star Brewery in St. Albans, Vt. A portion of sales helps support Purple Hearts Reunited, a nonprofit that works to restore lost or stolen Purple Hearts and other medals of valor to veterans.

More Ideas@Work:

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Norwich University Computer Security Program Supports Cybersecurity at Super Bowl 50

Five Norwich CSIA students and their professor stand outside Levi Stadium, site of Super Bowl 50
Norwich University Office of Communications

February 5, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – The Norwich University computer security and information assurance (CSIA) program, with students operating both onsite in California and on campus, will support Santa Clara Police Department, the lead law enforcement agency at Super Bowl 50, and the law enforcement and homeland security functions leading up to and during this international sporting event.

Norwich University is the only educational institution invited to participate in support of the public safety team tasked with safeguarding Super Bowl 50. With support from its campus based Global Threat Observatory, Norwich cybersecurity students will participate in the Super Bowl 50 Critical Infrastructure & Cyber Protection Sub Committee. This committee is led by Detective Sergeant Ray Carreira ’96 of the Santa Clara Police Department, the lead law enforcement agency for the event.

Three Norwich CSIA majors and NU cyberczar Phil Susmann '81 speak on campus about Super Bowl 50Throughout 2015 CSIA students worked with this team in preparation for this globally televised event and formed partnerships with leading software developers to support their work.

Levi’s Stadium, home of Super Bowl 50, is the most technologically capable stadium in the world. In preparation, CSIA students attended Wrestlemania and a major soccer match for fact-finding and familiarization with the security environment.

Super Bowl 50 will be broadcast in over 180 countries in 25 languages and is expected to reach over 115 million households in the USA, making it the most viewed event in history.

“I have been so impressed by these Norwich students and their professionalism, their ability to solve complex problems and the ease with which they have integrated into this intense law enforcement environment,” said Captain Phil Cooke, Santa Clara Police Department Super Bowl 50 Commander.

The Norwich University cybersecurity program began in 1999.

Ranked #2 by the Ponemon Institute for cyber security in the U.S., Norwich University programs are consistently ranked among the best in the nation for cyber security education.  Norwich University is recognized as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and has received designation as a Center of Digital Forensics Academic Excellence (CDFAE) by the Defense Cyber Crime Center (DC3). Beginning in 2002, Norwich University became a member of what is now called National Science Foundation’s Cyber Corps: Scholarship for Service program. Norwich is partnered with the United States Army Reserves (USAR) to develop cyber-education curricula that align with federal standards and cybersecurity needs.

“When I read about all the impressive work Norwich is doing with cyber, I took the opportunity to connect that expertise to a function for law enforcement of this major event,” Carreira said.

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Brig. Gen. Gary Keefe, USAFR ’86 to speak at Norwich University Veterans Day ceremony

Formal portrait of Gary Keefe, US Air Force Brigadier General
NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

October 19, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – The Norwich University Corps of Cadets and broader community will pay tribute to all veterans on Tuesday, Nov. 10 with a special remembrance ceremony at 1 p.m. on the Upper Parade Ground.

Highlighting the ceremony will be guest speaker Brigadier General Gary W. Keefe ’86, chief of staff of the Massachusetts Air National Guard.

Keefe graduated Norwich with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and commissioned in 1986. He completed his active duty service in 1992, at which time he joined the Massachusetts Air National Guard with the 104th Fighter Wing as an active guard/reservist. Keefe holds a Master of Science in Management from Lesley University and attended Air War College, National Defense University, and Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.

Keefe serves as chief of staff for the Massachusetts Air National Guard at the Massachusetts Joint Force Headquarters at Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford, Mass. He is the principal advisor to senior leaders, helping oversee the administration, coordination, planning, development and execution of all Air National Guard and National Guard Joint Staff programs. He ensures that 8,200 soldiers and airmen of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts are prepared for contingency operations in both federal and state emergencies.

Embodying the Norwich model of citizen soldier, Keefe also serves in a civilian occupation as the assistant adjutant general and executive officer for the Military Division of the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A statutory state employee position, Keefe serves as the full-time liaison for the adjutant general, the Massachusetts Army National Guard land component commander, and the Massachusetts Air National Guard air component commander on all matters pertaining to the missions of the Massachusetts National Guard.

The Veterans Day tribute at Norwich will include nine minutes of cannon fire in the Roll of Wars and a firing of three rifle volleys.

An open reception will follow the outdoor ceremony in the foyer of Jackman Hall.

Members of the Norwich and Northfield communities, area veterans, the general public, and those currently serving in the Armed Forces of the United States are cordially invited to attend. The uniform for this special event is the Service Class A uniform. Please plan on cold weather and dress accordingly.

About Norwich University 

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu