Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art to host design innovator Eli Gould

Office of Communications

Nov. 4, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art continues its 2015-16 Lecture Series with local architect Eli Gould, founder of design firm Ironwood Brand.

Gould will speak this coming Friday, Nov. 6 at 3 p.m. in the Chaplin Hall Gallery about his career as an architect and the innovations his firm brings to projects in the building industry.

Gould founded his firm Ironwood Brand in 1994 as a “Timber/Mill/Design/Build” firm. Based in Brattleboro, Vt., it offers custom prefab and installation of sophisticated timber designs. Ironwood Brand has designed and built some of the highest performing buildings in Vermont and is consistently sought after for unique design practice in challenging situations.

Gould’s firm is also developing three new companies specializing in advanced forestry and larger scale/lower cost prefabricated housing.

A licensed architect and graduate of Yale University, Gould began his career of high performance design practice at leading green-design firm William Maclay Architects in 2000. Gould went on to be involved in major projects, such as the Open_1 Prototype with MIT and Crotched Mountain Rehabilitation Center (CMRC), and was involved in the startup of Charpentes Montmorency, a timber frame manufacturing company for high-end design.

The NU School of Architecture + Art Lecture Series is supported by a generous grant from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation. For more than 10 years, the Byrne Foundation has partnered with Norwich to bring eminent national and international architects, designers, artists, and writers to campus. Events are free and open to the public.

The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation is a philanthropic organization that supports cancer research, education, volunteerism, and other charitable endeavors.

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is the only National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited architecture school in northern New England.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art to Host Renowned French Architect Jose Oubrerie

Photo portrait of French architecture Oubrerie against primary color blocks
NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

October 15, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt.Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art continues its 2015-16 Lecture Series with a presentation by renowned French architect Jose Oubrerie on Friday, Oct. 23 at 4 p.m. in Chaplin Hall Gallery.

An author and professor emeritus at Ohio State University’s Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture, Oubrerie was the last protégé of Charles-Edouard Jeanneret-Gris, a.k.a. Le Corbusier—one of the pioneers of modern architecture and design.

During his presentation, which is free and open to the public, Oubrerie will speak about his life and career.

Oubrerie studied at the School of Fine Arts in Nantes, France, before focusing on architecture at the Ecole Nationale Superiéure des Beaux-Arts in the 1950s.

He began his professional career working as an assistant to Le Corbusier in 1957 and continued until 1965, collaborating on several of Le Corbusier’s last buildings. These included the Brazil Pavilion, Hotel d’Orsay, the Strasbourg Convention Center, the Olivetti offices and factories in Milan, the Venice Hospital, the Zurichhorn Pavillion, and the Firminy Church. Oubrerie became a registered architect in 1970 after establishing his own practice and home in Paris.

Oubrerie’s résumé encompasses many prestigious works of his own. These include

  • the Miller Residence in Lexington, Kentucky, which received the Honor Award for Architectural Excellence from AIA Kentucky,
  • the French Cultural Center in Damascus, Syria, which won the Quality of Public Constructions Prize of the Ministry of Construction, Paris,
  • and the reconstruction of Le Corbusier’s L’Esprit Nouveau exhibit hall in Bologna, Italy.

Oubrerie also directed the realization of Le Corbusiers final vision, the church of Saint-Pierre de Firminy in France. Completed in 2006, it is considered a masterpiece of concrete, form, and light.

The NU School of Architecture + Art Lecture Series is supported by a generous grant from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation. For more than 10 years, the Byrne Foundation has partnered with Norwich University to bring eminent national and international architects, designers, artists, and writers to campus. Events are free and open to the public.

The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation is a philanthropic organization that supports cancer research, education and volunteerism, among many charitable endeavors.

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is the only National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited architecture school in northern New England.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Focus on Research: Norwich University Undergraduate Summer Research Fellows

Norwich University Office of Communications

September 18, 2015

Each year, Norwich University undergraduates vie for prestigious Summer Research Fellowships to explore diverse topics across the arts, sciences and professional fields. Developed by the university’s Office of Academic Research, the competitive, six- and ten-week fellowships are funded by university endowments dedicated to supporting student academic investigation. Working in labs, libraries and fields sites on campus and around the globe this summer, 28 fellows discovered the challenges and rewards of independent research. Read the stories of six recent fellows and some of the faculty mentors who support them.

Undergraduate Summer Research Fellows

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Maggie Cross ‘16
Electrical Engineering

A Glove That Helps Teach Sign Language
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Christopher Eddy ‘17
Geology

Deciphering a Tectonic Creation Story
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Abigail Seaberg ‘16
History

19th Century Painter William Brenton Boggs
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Jesse Abruzzi ‘16
English

Religious Tolerance in Stratford-upon-Avon
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Macial Porto ‘16
Biology

Leptin Receptors in the Avian Hypothalamus
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Keith Stipe ‘16
Architecture

Rammed Earth Buildings of the Desert Southwest
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Faculty Highlights

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Amy Woodbury Tease, PhD
Assistant Professor of English & Program Director, Undergraduate Research Program

5 Questions: Surveillance, Media Culture & Student Scholarship
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Megan Doczi, PhD
Neuroscientist & Assistant Professor of Biology

5 Questions: Neuroscience, Research & Lifelong Learning
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Norwich University School of Architecture + Art Receives $10k Grant to Fund Free Lecture Series

Norwich University School of Architecture + Art will receive $10,000 from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation to fund the upcoming 2015-2016 lecture series.

For more than 10 years the Byrne Foundation has partnered with Norwich University to support the School of Architecture + Art’s Lecture Series. Through these lectures—which are free to students and the local community—the School of Architecture + Art brings well-known architects, designers, artists and writers to campus from around the country.

The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation is a philanthropic organization that supports cancer research, education and volunteerism, among many charitable endeavors.

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is the only National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited architecture school in northern New England. In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The NAAB is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture.

The Norwich curriculum offers a minor in architectural studies, two art minors, a four-year bachelor’s degree in Architectural Studies and a one-and-a-half-year Master of Architecture degree. Combined, the bachelor and master programs form a five-year professional degree accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), a prerequisite for licensure in most states. All are designed for practical people who want to immerse themselves in an experiential academic lifestyle. The School of Architecture + Art is challenging, fun, and dedicated to producing architects who will serve the needs of people.

With approximately 200 students, the School of Architecture + Art is one of the smallest programs of its kind in the country, fostering a natural and effective mentoring relationship between faculty and students. Courses take a balanced approach to both the art and science of architecture and embrace environmental sustainability as part of Vermont’s ethos.

A highlight of the upcoming 2015-2016 lecture series program will be a lecture on Wednesday, October 14, by Pulitzer Prize winner Jose Galvez. The event will be presented in conjunction with the Department of Modern Languages and the College of Liberal Arts’ organized Hispanic Heritage Celebration and include an exhibit of photographs.

“This lecture series is an opportunity for the School of Architecture + Art to not only enhance the education of our students but to also offer ourselves as a resource to the surrounding community as experts in the field and world-class talent,” according to Director Cara Armstrong.

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.  

Media Contact:

Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
(802) 485-2886; (m) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu
Follow us on Twitter @NorwichNews

Norwich University Celebrates $6.8M Kreitzberg Library Renovation

Upgrades include state-of-the-art technology and enhanced energy efficiency.
Norwich University Office of Communications

August 31, 2015

Norwich University representatives will gather with building contractors and partners to mark the official opening of the campus’s newly renovated Kreitzberg Library on Tuesday, Sept. 1. A ceremonial ribbon-cutting event will be held at 3:15 p.m. inside the library foyer to celebrate the occasion, followed by guided tours of the new facility.

The $6.8 million renovation is the first completed project under the Forging the Future campaign. Announced at Homecoming in 2014, the university’s largest comprehensive fundraising effort aims to raise $100 million in the five years leading up to the university’s bicentennial in 2019.

A state-of-the-art library when it was built 23 years ago, Kreitzberg Library serves as the main student and faculty library on the Norwich campus. The library is named for principal donors Barbara and Fred Kreitzberg ’57. The original library was completed in 1993 at a cost of $8.1 million.

Computer and information technology has radically changed modern university libraries in the years since, transforming libraries from cathedrals of the book to cathedrals of learning.

The new renovations place Kreitzberg Library at the forefront of the latter category.

“Barbara and I have loved this library since its dedication in 1992,” Fred Kreitzberg ’57 said. “We know that students have enjoyed using this library and hope that with the new renovations it will be even better-suited for our technologically advanced students.”

While celebrating at the Sept. 1 event, the Norwich community will tour the library’s major enhancements, including new workstations, group-study and collaborative-learning areas, new technology-enabled classrooms and a café.

Additional improvements include two new conference rooms, and a 77% increase in the number of seats, from 249 to 440. The new library also boasts a 10-fold increase in data speeds and capacity and state of the art collaborative tools, thanks in part to a $125,000 grant from the George I. Alden Trust to support technology upgrades.

Construction began Dec. 17, 2014, with approximately 40 Vermonters working on site on an average day. At times that figure climbed to 60. The construction was primarily completed by Vermont firms employing Vermont workers, including EF Wall, Bates & Murray Electrical, Vermont Mechanical and Red Thread.

Demonstrating Norwich’s commitment to sustainability, the vast majority of installed lighting use LED bulbs, subsidized by Efficiency Vermont, with an estimated energy efficiency of 80%-90%. In addition, air handling units were upgraded, low volatile organic compounds (VOC) paint was used, and virtually all construction debris was recycled.

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
(802) 485-2886; (m) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu
Follow us on Twitter @NorwichNews

Student Research: A 3,000-Mile Architectural Journey Through the Desert Southwest

In June, senior architecture major Keith Stipe joined 27 other Norwich University undergraduate Summer Research Fellows who undertook in-depth research projects across the arts, sciences or professional fields. Awarded by the university’s Office of Academic Research, the competitive, six- and ten-week fellowships are funded by university endowments dedicated to supporting student academic investigation.
Norwich University Office of Communications

August 24, 2015

This summer, senior architecture major Keith Stipe toured the desert southwest to explore ancient and modern examples of earthen and rammed earth architecture and to speak to leading architects in the field.
keith_stipe_portrait

Beginning in Denver, Colo., Stipe drove some 3,000 miles over the course of three weeks, exploring sites in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Arizona.

Building styles ranged from thousand-year-old kivas built by the Pueblo peoples at Chaco National Historic Park in Chaco, New Mexico, to modern sculptor Paolo Soleri’s Cosanti home and studio in Paradise Valley, Arizona.

“One of the reasons this research is relevant and important is that even in our current day, a third to half of the world’s population lives in earthen buildings,” Stipe says.

“There’s a huge population of the world that relies on the availability and the easy use of earthen building materials. So it’s something that’s worth continuing to explore and develop in the future.”

His first stop was the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., designed by I.M. Pei, a concrete structure that uses soil and pigment to make a visual connection to the surrounding Colorado landscape.

Other sites included the 30,000-square-foot PERA office building in Sante Fe, the largest rammed earth building in the southwest; Georgia O’Keefe’s Abiquiu, NM, home and studio; and the Lemuria Earthship, an off-the-grid rammed earth home near Taos, New Mexico.

At each site, Stipe studied the architecture’s technical and aesthetic qualities. He sketched site layouts, photographed architectural elements, and measured wall thicknesses to estimate thermal mass and passive heating and cooling abilities.

The aspiring architect also observed the buildings’ relationships to place and landscape, noting how the structures earthen building materials provided a poetic connection to the landscape.

In Arizona, Stipe interviewed influential rammed earth architect Eddie Jones.

Danny Sagan, an associate professor of architecture and program director for NU’s School of Architecture + Art, served as Stipe’s research advisor. “Architecture is uniquely difficult to study in that many of the examples we use to teach the principles of the subject are not located in Vermont,” he says.

He adds that architecture of place must be derived from regionally appropriate building technologies. Stipe’s trip into the arid Southwest allowed him to explore architecture informed by different influences.

“By traveling into an new environment, Keith was able to see the subject of architecture with new eyes,” Sagan says. “Every architecture student should travel to see architecture in a place very different than the places they know. It makes their studies much broader and therefore much more relevant.”

Stipe documented his trip via social media and photography. He plans to produce a book as his final research product, one that synthesizes his visual impressions with research findings and analysis.

Stipe’s research budget of $3,940, which covered food, lodging, travel expenses, and a new digital SLR camera, were covered by his Summer Research Fellowship stipend.

“Architecture is an art which arises not only from an instinctual need for warmth or shelter, but also from a human desire to synthesize and create at a level which is in harmony with landscape and environment,” Stipe notes.

Modern building approaches often involve demolishing a landscape, building suburbs, then replanting trees—a process that doesn’t acknowledge place, he says. “We try to change the environment to fit our perceptions or needs, rather than using the environment as a tool [for] showing us how to live in an area.”

His fellowship now complete, Stipe will spend the fall semester studying architecture and design in Berlin, Germany, at Norwich University’s City Lab: Berlin micro campus.

Related Articles on Undergraduate Summer Research Fellows:

Norwich in the News: “Aspiring Architects Start Building Their Futures”

Norwich University Office of Communications

July 13, 2015

Burlington-based CBS affiliate WCAX-TV recently profiled Norwich University’s Summer Design Academy, a week-long residential architecture and design program for high school students sponsored by NU’s School of Architecture + Art.

“The budding builders are creating things large and small, tackling topics like scale, proportion, light and design, in a mix of studio, seminar and field experiences,” WCAX’s Keith McGilvery reported.

Burlington-based designer and Norwich alum Josh Chafe co-directed the design program. He told WCAX that Norwich’s Summer Design Academy offered participants experience relevant beyond the field of architecture, including how to work in a group, create on fly, and reject ideas without guilt in order to start over.

Watch the full video news feature here.

Photo by Norwich University.

Undergraduate Summer Research: Museums, Brains, Proteins and Murder

Norwich University undergraduates are hard at work this summer investigating diverse research topics across the arts, sciences and professional fields. Their competitive, six- and ten-week paid summer research fellowships are funded by university endowments dedicated to supporting student academic investigation.
By David Westerman, PhD
Norwich University Office of Academic Research

 
June 30, 2015

Editor’s note: Charles A. Dana Professor of Geology and Associate Vice President for Research David Westerman is blogging about Norwich undergraduate student research projects underway this summer in field sites, labs and libraries on campus and around the globe.

This week’s lunchtime research presentations on campus featured Undergraduate Research Fellows and faculty from multiple disciplines, inviting lively discussion on museum design, chicken brains, pilot response times, proteins, and serial murder.

Fellow Sarah Bedard ‘17 (Architecture) kicked off Tuesday’s discussion, explaining the code of ethics for adding architectural additions onto an existing art museum. This summer, she will evaluate two museums in Toronto and one in Massachusetts built by well-known architects. She plans to assess the circulation paths, overlapping spaces, and private vs. public usages. She will present her work as a series of case studies and a final poster.

Stacia Melick (Biology) described her work on voltage-gated potassium ion channel expression in the embryonic chicken hypothalamus. She is testing the hypothesis that the specific Kv1.3 gene is expressed in a similar fashion as the Insulin Receptor gene, due to a known interaction of these proteins elsewhere in the nervous system. The interaction of the Kv1.3 and Insulin Receptor proteins has been known to alter neuronal excitability in the olfactory bulb, and she is testing the hypothesis that this interaction may also play a role in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis.

Next up was Tim Smeddal (Mechanical Engineering), who is investigating how pilots are able to perceive and interact with aircraft instruments. For this project, Tim will survey approximately 100 aircraft pilots to determine which gauge is more accurate for certain altitudes by testing them on fixed points as well as trends in altitude. He is currently working out of Burlington International Airport, but also hopes to incorporate military pilots into his survey.

Thursday’s Brown Bag discussion featured Fellow Devon Lindner (Molecular Biology) and faculty member Assistant Professor Elizabeth Gurian (Criminal Justice). Devon is investigating a novel protein binding relationship between Fyn, a Src family kinase, and MCM6, a protein involved in cell division. To test the hypothesis that there is a relationship between Fyn and MCM6, Devon is conducting literature reviews and running laboratory experiments under the mentorship of Associate Professor Karen Hinkle (Biology) to understand their interactions. Devon hopes that her findings can eventually lead to contributions in cancer research.

Finally, Prof. Elizabeth Gurian provided a glimpse into her ongoing work on serial murder. She explained how the lack of scientific papers on female perpetrated homicide and serial murder is attributable, in part, to the rarity of these incidents, which does not permit ordinary research methods to be easily employed. The examination of these offenses is further limited due to definitional issues, complex rationales for committing criminal homicide, and gendered perceptions of homicide and serial murder, or inclusion under generalized findings on male homicide offenders. Prof. Gurian talked about her methods and approach to her project and explained that by dispelling stereotypes and gendered perceptions we may achieve a better understanding of female homicide offending.

About the Author: David S. Westerman, PhD, is the Charles A. Dana Professor of Geology at Norwich University and the Associate Vice President for Research in the university’s Office of Academic Research.

Photograph by Keith Stipe

Norwich University’s Award-Winning Solar House Earns Recognition in Regional EPA Earth Day Awards

Norwich University Office of Communications

Updated May 1, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – A team of Norwich University students was recognized by the New England Office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at this year’s Earth Day ceremony in Boston with a 2015 Environmental Merit Award.

The four alumni and two professors present to receive the award helped design and build Norwich’s Delta T-90, the 2013 solar house that won the affordability category at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon in Irvine, Calif.

The team’s latest accolade from the EPA was bestowed in “recognition of exceptional work and commitment to the environment” at a special ceremony held at Faneuil Hall in Boston, Mass., on Wednesday, April 22, 2015.

The annual Earth Day ceremony has recognized the environmental achievements of New Englanders for more than three decades.

“Our students tasked themselves with addressing a real and immediate problem in their community—providing a compelling housing solution that is both affordable and sustainable,” said Aron Temkin, an architect, professor and dean of the College of Professional Schools at Norwich University. “We are very pleased to see them recognized this way, because it reinforces the viability and impact of their work.”

Temkin adds that it also speaks to the impact of the “Norwich educational experience of a cross disciplinary collaboration of designer, engineer and constructor that they will be practicing throughout their careers.”

Today’s EPA merit award is the latest in a string of awards and honors the Delta T-90 solar house has garnered since its inception.

More than a year after successfully competing in the 2013 Solar Decathlon, Norwich University’s Delta T-90 House won the Vermont Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIAVT) 2014 People’s Choice Award.

The Delta T-90 House models how high performance solar-powered dwellings can be made affordably. At the 2013 US Solar Decathlon event in California, the home earned first-place awards for affordability and energy balance. The team also earned the Byron Stafford Award of Distinction for their character and sportsmanship.

Since the competition’s close, the Delta T-90 house has delivered on its mission to educate the public about residential-scale renewable energy and green-design by becoming part of the Westcott Center for Architecture and Design in Springfield, Ohio. The center boasts a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed prairie-style house and seeks to involve and promote architecture and design practices as a medium for educating K-12 students in social studies, math, science, and the arts.

Since moving to Springfield, the Delta T-90 house has graced the cover of Green Energy Ohio magazine and been the subject of many articles. The house has also helped the Westcott Center earn grants from the Ohio Arts Council and the Institute of Museum and Library Services by evidencing strong public outreach capabilities.

Through features like its integrated, digital energy-monitoring dashboard, the Delta T-90 house shows students real-time, measurable evidence of the value of design thinking. It does this by comparing real-time energy use to real-time energy production by the Delta T-90’s 5.84KW solar panel system.

Norwich University Associate Professor Matt Lutz, the faculty leader of the Delta T-90 project, praised the Wescott partnership and the role the Norwich solar house plays today to serve the nonprofit’s central mission.

“The Norwich team couldn’t be more proud of the partnership that the Delta T-90 has helped form with the Westcott Center for Architecture and Design. There, the house is really doing what we intended it to do, to become a living laboratory that will educate the public for years.”

Students and faculty in Norwich University’s College of Professional Schools have now embarked on a plan to design sustainable, micro-houses for low-income Vermonters. Read about the project here.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
(802) 485-2886; 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich Offers Architecture, Cybersecurity Summer Camps for Teens

Rising juniors and seniors will build their own computer and study cyberdefense in a free, week-long camp sponsored by the National Science Foundation, while budding architects explore design with top Norwich faculty.
Norwich University Office of Communications

April 10, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University is offering two new summer camps led by standout Norwich faculty and alumni for rising high school juniors and seniors.

The first program, GenCyber@NU, is a free, US government-sponsored camp for cyber security and cyber defense in which students will build their own computers to take home. The week-long pre-college program, to be held from June 21-27, is designed for students interested in information security, digital forensics, cyberattack defense, and personal online protection.

The camp is funded by a grant from the National Security Agency and National Science Foundation and is FREE for attending students. All expenses for the week-long program, including tuition, room and board, round-trip airfare and transportation to and from the Norwich University campus (as applicable), field trips, and other program fees are covered at no cost to GenCyber participants.

Applications are due May 1. Interested students should submit a letter of interest, a letter of recommendation and an unofficial high school transcript via email to gencyber@norwich.edu. For more information: bit.do/cyber-camp.

Norwich University undergraduate and online graduate programs are consistently ranked among the best in the nation for cyber security education and are certified by the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security as Centers of Academic Excellence (CAE). Norwich University has been a member of the National Science Foundation’s Cyber Corps Scholarship for Service program since 2002.

The second program is facilitated by Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art, which will hold a Summer Design Academy from July 5-11. During the weeklong program, students will grapple with design thinking and explore the communication of their ideas through various media and hands-on projects.

Workshops, lectures, demonstrations and off-campus experiences complement daily design studios. Students will gain a broader view of the field while developing skills and portfolio materials to add to their college applications. Students will also be advised on the college admission and portfolio-building processes.

Local designer and Norwich alumnus Joshua Chafe of Truex Cullins in Burlington, Vt., will join School of Architecture + Art faculty to provide design guidance and critique as students learn to design and build full-scale structures and spaces during studio time.

The cost, including room and board, is $750. Applications will be accepted through May 20. For more information: http://bit.ly/1CDBp8r.

The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture. Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is the only NAAB accredited architecture school in northern New England.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
(802) 485-2886, (m) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu