Norwich University’s Center for Global Resilience and Security Holds Summit for Community Resilience Organizations and Researchers

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

April 17, 2017

Norwich University’s Center for Global Resilience and Security, in collaboration with Community Resilience Organizations (CROs) will hold the “CROs-ARC Summit: Think Global, Act Local,” an event to connect statewide CROs teams and academic researchers interested in participating in the new Academic Research Collaborative (ARC) on Saturday, April 29, 2017 from 8:15 a.m.-1:45 p.m.

The summit provides a day of short, inspiring presentations by local action teams (CROs), resource providers, and academic researchers (ARC), plus a noon lecture on social engagement by Rebecca Sanborn Stone, a community planner, engagement specialist, writer and speaker with expertise in resilience, local capacity building and communications.

Presentations include ecological solutions, with NU’s Simon Pearish and Lyndon State’s Ian Balcom; water and energy resilience; cybersecurity with NU’s Huw Read; and art integration. Informational showcase highlights housing, water, energy, climate, food systems, hazard mitigation, etc. from state agency experts and non-profit groups.

Peg Elmer Hough and Amanda Blank with CROs; Jared Ulmer with the Department of Health’s Climate and Health Program; Paige Heverly of Vital Communities (Energy and Transportation project coordinator); and Ben Rose, Recovery and Mitigation Section Chief, Vermont Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, are some of the key Vermont experts presenting at the summit.

The CROs-ARC Summit is slated to end early enough to allow participants to join the Climate Rally at the statehouse in Montpelier, scheduled from 1 – 4 p.m.

“This event is to help the CROs strengthen their teams, learn about new and existing resources and get the latest updates in areas critical to resilience and security in their communities,” Center for Global Resilience and Security Director Tara Kulkarni, Ph.D. said. “We also want to connect academic researchers to the problems facing the CRO teams and engage students in the discussion.”

Registration Fee: $35 includes breakfast and lunch. Registration deadline is April 20, 2017, at: https://alumni.norwich.edu/CROsARCsummit.

The summit is sponsored by: Catamount Solar, Vermont Community Resilience Organizations, Center for Global Resilience and Security at Norwich University, Center for Civic Engagement at Norwich University.

The Center for Global Resilience and Security (CGRS) is a Norwich University research center of excellence dedicated to the advancement of the interrelationships between human resilience and sense of security in the face of global challenges. CGRS is focused on challenges in the areas of climate change, water, energy, and infrastructure and their impact on resilience and security. CGRS will craft creative, innovative, and sustainable solutions for building resilient communities, through inter-disciplinary research and design collaboration.

For more information, please contact: nucgrs@norwich.edu.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

“Fire & Ice” Author Jonathan Mingle Visits Norwich Writers Series

Photo: Author Jonathan Mingle speaks at lecture in Kreitzberg Library on the Norwich campus

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zb9RS4_TCqE&w=560&h=315]

Norwich University Office of Communications

November 1, 2016

On campus for a Norwich Writers Series reading last week, journalist and author Jonathan Mingle took time to discuss three central ideas from his recent book on black carbon, global warming, and its impact on a small Himalayan village. Norwich Associate Writing Professor and Writers Series Director Sean Prentiss makes a cameo. And Tara Kulkarni, an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, discusses how Mingle’s book and reading helps her students as academics, researchers, and citizens by cutting across disciplines—using story to connect climate change, people, and policy.

Norwich Writers Series Continues With Environmental Author Jonathan Mingle

Photo of Jonathan Mingle taken outside against a forested backdrop
NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Oct. 10, 2016

Norwich University’s 2016-17 Writers Series continues with environmental author Jonathan Mingle on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 4 p.m. in the Kreitzberg Library Multipurpose Room.

Free and open to the public, Mingle will read from his book and answer questions about environmental writing, climate issues, and black carbon.

Mingle graduated from the Energy and Resources Group at University of California, Berkeley; is a former Middlebury Fellow in Environmental Journalism and a recipient of the American Alpine Club’s Zack Martin Breaking Barriers Award.

He is the author of Fire and Ice: Soot, Solidarity, and Survival on the Roof of the World, a nonfiction narrative about black carbon pollution, its health and climate impacts around the world, and solutions for cleaning it up. His writing on the environment, climate, and development has appeared in The New York Times, Slate, The Boston Globe, and many other places.

Free and open to the public, this event is hosted by The David Crawford School of Engineering, the department of Environmental Science, the Peace and War Center and the Writers Series. Norwich Writers Series is produced by the College of Liberal Arts Department of English and Communications.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Ideas @ Work: #7 Climate Change and National Security

Photo: Gen. Gordon R. Sullivan speaks at Norwich Todd Lecture Series
33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Nearly a decade ago, the Military Advisory Board of the CNA Corporation, a government-funded nonprofit military research organization, identified climate change as a threat-multiplier in fragile areas of the globe. Two years ago, the panel of 16 retired American generals and admirals—NU’s own General Gordon R. Sullivan ’59 among them—issued a second report. In it, they concluded that the risks to national security from climate change were accelerating. Last year, General Sullivan gave a Todd Lecture on the topic. Citing the example of Syria, he noted how five years of drought in the country decimated farmers’ crops, forcing millions to migrate to urban areas. There, they quickly became disenfranchised by the government. “The result is civil war in Syria,” Sullivan said. The one-time U.S. Army Chief of Staff challenged Norwich students and faculty to lead the way in our nation’s response to the global challenge.

More Ideas@Work:

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Norwich to Host Filmmaker Ben Kalina for Climate Change Documentary Screening and Panel

Winner of the 2014 Sundance Film Festival award for best documentary, the director of “Shored Up” asks tough questions about our coastal communities and our relationship to the land
Norwich University Office of Communications

 
April 15, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University will host documentary filmmaker Ben Kalina and screen his 2014 Sundance Film Festival winning documentary on climate change and coastal communities, “Shored Up: When Human Nature and the Force of Nature Collide,” on Monday, April 20 at 7 p.m.

A panel discussion on community resiliency with Kalina, a Norwich engineering professor, and a state of Vermont employee involved in Tropical Storm Irene response among others will follow. Both events are free and open to the public and will be held in Cabot 85.

“Shored Up” asks tough questions about our coastal communities and our relationship to the land in the face of disappearing beaches and coastlines.

According to Variety, Kalina took inspiration from John McPhee’s book “The Control of Nature” and originally set out to make a film about the US Army Corps of Engineers’ efforts to replace sand along our eroding shorelines.

That was before Hurricane Sandy struck. Using footage from the devastating storm and its aftermath, Kalina constructed an intentionally understated but sturdy film.

Writing in Variety, Geoff Berkshire describes it as a “sobering examination of the threat rising sea levels pose to coastal cities and the economic factors that encourage doubters to keep their heads firmly buried in fast-disappearing sand.”

Joining Kalina on Monday’s panel are:

  • Kate White, PhD, of the US Army Corp of Engineers Climate Preparedness and Resilience Community of Practice, Institute for Water Resources
  • Tara Kulkarni, PhD, assistant professor of civil engineering, Norwich University
  • Ben Rose, recovery and mitigation section chief, Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, Vermont Dept. of Public Safety
  • Michael Crowley, senior program officer for the US Program, Institute for Sustainable Communities

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu    

Media Contact: 
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
(802) 485-2886, (m) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu
Follow us on Twitter @NorwichNews

Climate Change Increasing Security Threat, Former Army Chief Says

In a Todd Lecture Series speech at Norwich, GEN Gordon R. Sullivan said global warming is spurring a spate of growing risks to US interests
Office of Communications

February 6, 2015

Former US Army Chief of Staff Gordon R. Sullivan NU ’59 said climate change is spurring more instability around the world and that the security risks from global warming are advancing faster than expected.

“We are not prepared for the pace of climate change,” Sullivan said, noting that it will impact US military readiness and national power, particularly domestic infrastructure.

Already the US has been caught flat-footed by the speed of melting sea ice in the Arctic. Russia, Canada and Denmark are posturing for control of oil reserves beneath the North Pole. But the US lacks sufficient ice-hardened ships and communications and navigation gear to respond to crises there, Sullivan said.

Elsewhere, shifting weather patterns will stress the world’s ability to meet regional demand for food and fresh water, leading to further political unrest and potential mass transnational migrations. Sullivan said this is particularly true in Africa and Asia, where the human population is exploding.

Climate change will place more demand on the US military to respond to national and international crises, challenge readiness and send troops into harsher operating environments, Sullivan said.

The retired four-star general made the remarks yesterday during a speech focused on climate change and national security at his alma mater, kicking off the first Todd Lecture Series event of 2015.

Established in 2008, the free public lecture series aims to bring thought-provoking speakers to inform and inspire the Norwich campus and central Vermont communities.

Sullivan served as the 32nd Army Chief of Staff under Presidents Bush and Clinton, where he helped reengineer and downsize the US Army in the wake of the Cold War, leading it into the Information Age while facing a 40 percent budget cut.

Since 2006, Sullivan has served on the Military Advisory Board of the CNA Corp., a government-funded nonprofit military research organization.

In 2007, the panel of 16 retired generals and admirals identified climate change as a “threat multiplier,” particularly in fragile areas of the globe.

The board issued a second report last year, concluding that climate change poses an accelerating risk to national security.

For example, it linked the devastating drought of 2010 in the US, Russia and China to a steep decline in world wheat production that sparked a series of cascading effects. Bread prices spiked in Tunisia, Egypt and other wheat-importing countries in Northern Africa. The shortages and massive price increases led to food riots and unrest that precipitated the Arab Spring revolutions.

“While there were deep underlying causes for overthrow of several of the governments, the catalyst that set this off can be directly linked to weather and climate change,” Sullivan said.

Sullivan’s speech outlined the effects climate change is having on four major areas related to US national security: global instability, melting Arctic sea ice, US military readiness and US power.

Sullivan gave a synopsis of recent climate change trends and how they might destabilize regimes or regions in the future.

He noted that in January, both NASA and NOAA reported that 2014 was the warmest year on record since 1880, that the ten warmest years on record have occurred since 2000, and that eight of the ten costliest US storms have occurred in the past decade.

“Globally, we have seen recent prolonged drought act as a factor driving both spikes in food prices and mass displacement of populations, each contributing to instability and eventual conflict,” he said.

“For example, five years of drought in Syria decimated farmers’ crops and forced millions to migrate to urban areas. These drought refugees found little in the way of jobs and were quickly disenfranchised with the government,” Sullivan said.

“The result is civil war in Syria.”

Sullivan said additional impacts can be seen in unprecedented wildfires and the effect of rising sea levels on low-lying island nations, some of which are planning whole-sale evacuation.

“Over the coming decades, I think those areas already stressed by water and food shortage and poor governance—these span the globe—will present the greatest near term threat for conflict,” he said.

“In the longer term, many of these areas will be threatened by rising sea level.”

Sullivan, who serves as Chairman of the Board of Trustees at Norwich, closed his presentation by challenging Norwich students to lead the nation in tackling the complex problems associated with climate change.

GEN Gordon R. Sullivan to Discuss Climate Change in Spring Todd Lecture

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University continues its Todd Lecture Series this spring with “National Security Implications of Climate Change,’’ a presentation by former Army Chief of Staff, General Gordon R. Sullivan on February 5, 2015, at 7 p.m. in Plumley Armory.

Sullivan served as the 32nd Army Chief of Staff under President Bill Clinton. In the post, the four star general helped reengineer and downsize the US Army in the wake of the Cold War, leading it into the Information Age while facing a 40 percent budget cut.

Sullivan is the president and chief executive officer of the Association of the United States Army, headquartered in Arlington, Va.

Sullivan received a bachelor of arts in political science from Norwich University and commissioned as a US Army second lieutenant of Armor in 1959. He served two tours in Vietnam and is the recipient of the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Legion of Merit and the Army Distinguished Service Medal. Sullivan retired from the Army in 1995 after more than 36 years of active service.

Sullivan currently serves as the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Norwich University and the Marshall Legacy Institute. He holds positions on the MITRE Army Advisory Board, the MIT Lincoln Labs Advisory Board, the CNA Military Advisory Board and as a Life Trustee of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.

During his Feb. 5 lecture, Sullivan will discuss two studies published in recent years that draw conclusions about the threat of climate change to national security including its role as a threat multiplier for instability in volatile parts of the world and its interrelationship with national security and energy dependence. This lecture is hosted by the College of National Services.

Norwich University’s Todd Lecture Series is named in honor of Army Maj. Gen. Russell Todd (USA Ret.) and his wife, Carol, in gratitude for their dedicated service to the university. Todd ’50, serves as Norwich President Emeritus. With this series, Norwich brings the nation’s foremost thought leaders from the worlds of business, politics, the arts, science, the military and other disciplines to campus. All events are free and open to the public.

For more information please check the Todd Lecture Series website or call (802) 485-2633.