Norwich University Hosts 8th Annual CSI Symposium April 28-29

Norwich University Office of Communications

April 13, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University will host its eighth annual CSI Symposium on Tuesday and Wednesday, April 28-29.

Speakers will include Arlington, Texas, police Sergeant Brook Rollins on “Drone Technology and Surveillance,” New York State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation Lieutenant Rob Appleton ’92 on “Internet Crimes Against Children,” Martin Davin and Mike Perez on “Computer Tracking and LoJac for Laptops,” and Dr. Gary Margolis on “Threats in a Social Media World.”

Hosted by the Norwich University College of Liberal Arts and Board of Fellows, all events are free and open to the public and take place in Dole Auditorium.

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, April 28

    5-7 p.m.
    Brook Rollins (Arlington, TX PD) on “Drone Technology and Surveillance”

Wednesday, April 29

    9-9:50 a.m.
    Rob Appleton (Computer Crimes Unit, State of New York) on “Internet Crimes Against Children”
    10-10:50 a.m.
    Martin Davin and Mike Perez (formerly with NYPD, now with Absolute Software) on “Computer Tracking and LoJac for Laptops”
    11-11:50 a.m.
    Gary Margolis (Margolis Healy/Social Sentinel) on “Threats in a Social Media World”

For more information, please contact the event coordinators: Isabel Weinger Nielsen, inielsen@norwich.edu, 802.485.2455 or Professor Penny Shtull, pshtull@norwich.edu>, 802.485.2373.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
(802) 485-2886, (m) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

8th Annual Norwich CSI Symposium Convenes April 28-29, 2015

By Isabel Weinger Nielsen | College of Liberal Arts

 
Updated April 13, 2015

The 8th Annual CSI Symposium will be held in Dole Auditorium on Tuesday, April 28 and Wednesday, April 29. Speakers will include

  • Sergeant Brook Rollins (Arlington, TX, PD) on “Drone Technology and Surveillance”
  • Lieutenant Rob Appleton ’92 (Computer Crimes Unit, State of New York) on “Internet Crimes Against Children”
  • Martin Davin and Miguel Perez (formerly with NYPD, now with Absolute Software) on “Computer Tracking and LoJac for Laptops” and
  • Gary Margolis (Margolis Healy/Social Sentinel) on “Threats in a Social Media World.”

Norwich University has hosted the CSI Symposium each spring since 2008, presenting a cross-disciplinary approach to crime scene investigation, case resolution, and crime prevention. The symposium aims to boost student interest in forensics, crime investigation, criminal justice, and related fields. Presentations are given on a variety of topics and demonstrate that law enforcement is supported by many professions, including law, information technology, engineering, science, and medicine. The event is co-sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and the Norwich University Board of Fellows.

Begun as a means of promoting a new forensic science course, the CSI Symposium is designed to appeal to both science and criminal justice majors. Over the years, it has been expanded to attract students from all disciplines. Keynote speakers have included Dr. Henry Lee on “Crime Scene Reconstruction,” detective inspector Anne Lawrence on “Investigation of the July 2005 London Bombings,” Sgt. detective Daniel Duff and Lt. detective Robert Merner on “Craigslist Killer,” Dr. Richard Ovens on “Forensic Interview and Education,” and detective Biff Brady and former assistant chief of police Joseph Loughlin on “Technology Used in the Amy St. Laurent Homicide Case.” Other notable speakers have included pathologist Dr. Michael Baden and forensic odontologist Dr. Lowell Levine.

Rob Appleton ’92, COLA Board of Fellows member, has been the driving force behind the event since its inception. An 18-year veteran of the New York State Police, Rob has invited experts from New York, New England, Toronto, and even New Scotland Yard (UK) to speak at Norwich. Alumni have also given presentations at the symposium, including FBI special agent Gary Hoover ’92, senior intelligence analyst Ken Bell M’13, and Chuck Nettleship ’85, M’03 of Triquetra Technologies and COLA Board of Fellows member.

The event is free and open to the public. Updates and the CSI Symposium schedule can be found at libarts.norwich.edu/csi-symposium/.

For more information, contact event coordinators Professor Penny Shtull at pshtull@norwich.edu or Isabel Weinger Nielsen,inielsen@norwich.edu.

Norwich Writers Series to Host Iraq War Vet, Memoirist Kayla Williams

Norwich University Office of Communications

Updated April 13, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – The Norwich University Writers Series continues with Iraq War veteran and memoirist, Kayla Williams, author of “Plenty of Time When We Get Home: Love & Recovery in the Aftermath of War” (2014) and “Love My Rifle More than You: Young & Female in the U.S. Army” (2006). Williams will read on Tuesday, April 21, at 4 p.m. in the Chaplin Hall Gallery.

Williams has appeared in numerous media interviews including this radio piece on PRI’s The World from February 2014, and including an appearance on Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show during a segment dealing with claim backlog at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Williams enlisted in the U.S. Army as an interpreter in 2000. She served as a sergeant and Arabic linguist in a military intelligence company of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) for five years. During that time, she spent a year deployed in Iraq and Kuwait during the buildup to and ultimate invasion of Iraq in 2003. Williams served at the forefront of troops’ interaction with Iraqis while navigating the challenges of being part of the 15 percent female minority enlisted in the Army.

“Love My Rifle More Than You: Young and Female in the U.S. Army” is a memoir about Williams’ experiences negotiating the changing demands on today’s military. “Plenty of Time When We Get Home: Love and Recovery in the Aftermath of War” details Williams’ marriage to Brian McGough, who was wounded by a roadside bomb in Iraq. The book explores the effects of traumatic brain injury and PTSD.

Williams is a 2013 White House Woman Veteran Champion of Change, Truman National Security Project Fellow, and member of the Army Education Advisory Committee, and a former member of the VA Advisory Committee on Women Veterans. She currently lives near Washington, D.C., with her husband.

The Norwich Writers Series event is presented by the university’s Center for Peace and War, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Department of English & Communications. All events in this series are free and open to the public. Williams’ memoir will be on sale at the event. A book signing will follow the reading.

Media Contact

Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
dlarkin@norwich.edu
802-485-2886 or 595-3613(m)

Follow us on Twitter @NorwichNews

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu

Undergraduate Research Highlights From the College of Liberal Arts

By Isabel Weinger Nielsen | College of Liberal Arts

December 5, 2014

Students in the College of Liberal Arts, working with faculty mentors, have been involved in many exciting projects at Norwich University. Some recent highlights:

Psychology major Ali Shahidy ’17 is the first student from Afghanistan to attend Norwich University. His summer research project, under the mentorship of Criminal Justice Professor Travis Morris, was titled “How is Jihad Marketed in Kabul, Afghanistan?” Shahidy was able to develop six typologies through which Jihadi information is disseminated, and concluded that Jihadi information circulates in Kabul on a regular basis, in multiple manners, and on a large scale. However, the study could not conclude that all texts are propaganda with a specific purpose to influence and encourage people to join a Jihadi movement; some texts or speeches on Jihad are ideological concepts that are taught as part of the religious studies, and therefore they can’t be defined as propaganda. Shahidy said, “I valued the opportunity to conduct one-on-one in-depth academic works with a faculty mentor who is an expert on the subject matter. The research project is a process through which I have learned tremendously about academic research from my mentor.” Shahidy will be staffing the Undergraduate Research information table as one of its new Ambassadors.

Wren and Gwynn’s London

Shaili Patel ’16 is a double-major in architectural studies and history who was mentored by Professor Emily Gray. Patel traveled to London this past summer on an Undergraduate Research Fellowship to conduct research in the British Library. She studied two architects who conceptually redesigned the city of London: Christopher Wren in the late seventeenth century, and John Gwynn in the late eighteenth. Patel’s paper has been accepted for presentation at the Phi Alpha Theta (history honors society) undergraduate research conference in November at Roger Williams University. Patel said “working on the project was an adventure; it was a story coming to life. I spent most of my time in the British Library looking at old maps. While I walked around the city, these maps became reality, and I could imagine how London looked and felt in the 17th and 18th centuries. The project was a limitless expansion of imagination and creativity. “

Nile Journal

Frank Carissimo, a double major in history and studies in war & peace with a minor in political science, will graduate in December 2014. Mentored by History Professor Rowly Brucken, Carissimo will present a paper based on his summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship at the Phi Alpha Theta conference. His paper, “War and Hardship on the Nile: The Journal of Frederick Charles Miller,” is based on a journal of Charles Miller that was donated by a Norwich alumnus to the University’s Archives and Special Collections. In 1885, Miller documented an expedition to rescue British Governor-General Charles George “Chinese” Gordon from the city of Khartoum, a subject which had never been studied by historians. Frank said, “The Miller journal of 1885, one of a collection of four, was fascinating to research, as each day brought more unstudied pages [to light]. The research was extremely rewarding as it was the first project I’ve completed thus far in which no other person or source-other than the 1885 Miller journal-could answer my questions.”

Post-WWII Japan

International studies major Jake Freeman ’17 was mentored by Dean Andrea Talentino. His summer research project, “From Destruction to Stability,” examined the methods and circumstances that led to the successful rebuilding of Japan after WWII through the national investment of social and economic resources by the United States for the purpose of developing a mutually beneficial relationship of security and economic interests.

Freeman’s study showed that economic policies promoting the middle class, combined with social institutions that continue to reinforce the outcomes of those policies, along with a mutual security interest make a successful mission. Freeman said, “The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship and working closely with Dr. Talentino opened my eyes to research being a professional way to discover things no one else has and, that each person’s research is a small jigsaw piece to a [complete] picture of understanding.”

About Undergraduate Research

Norwich students have a wealth of options when it comes to learning. One of the most exciting developments in this area is the Undergraduate Research Program, which provides funding to students for summer research projects, original research, or creative work projects done during the academic year, as well as opportunities to present papers at professional meetings.

Each October, a Faculty Scholarship Celebration is held on campus featuring displays of faculty/student joint summer research fellowship projects. In December, an Undergraduate Research Symposium generates conversation about research methods across disciplines and gets students thinking about independent research. The symposium provides a collaborative forum for students to develop their research ideas and introduces them to a range of funding opportunities. In May, a Student Scholarship Celebration allows students the opportunity to display their research abstracts from the previous summer or academic year, and recipients of upcoming summer grants are acknowledged.

A recently created Ambassadors Program enlists Undergraduate Research fellows from the previous year to promote the program by visiting classes, attending department meetings, displaying their research posters in the Wise Campus Center, and providing information to future student researchers.

English Professor Amy Woodbury Tease and Criminal Justice Professor Travis Morris are the COLA representatives to the Undergraduate Research Committee.

Read more about Norwich Undergraduate Research.

Student Project Burgeons Into US Grand Strategy Conference

By Kaitlin Nelson ’13 | College of Liberal Arts

December 5, 2014

Norwich University was founded on the educational philosophies of Capt. Alden Partridge, who was a strong proponent of experiential learning. Nearly two centuries later, Norwich students are still “learning by doing,” as demonstrated by the creation of the US Grand Strategy Conference this fall.

Sponsored by the Norwich University Center for Studies in War and Peace, the inaugural conference was born out of a yearlong independent research project led by Preston Huntington ’14 and William Cuervo ’14 on the basis and future of US Grand Strategy. Once started, the project took on a life of its own, as the two researchers soon found out. “When Will and I first began the research for our Independent Study,” Huntington said, “I don’t believe either of us really expected it to amount to what it eventually became as our senior year went on.” The project became fully immersive, allowing Cuervo and Huntington to engage in high level analysis as well as speak to experts in the field, including personnel from the Department of Defense, the various military branches, and the service academies.

Inspired by their research, the US Grand Strategy Conference was conceived, and a group of students in Professor Sarwar Kashmeri’s independent study class were tasked with helping bring this dream into fruition. Many highly specialized delegates were invited to attend, allowing Norwich students the opportunity to learn from the people who hold positions that many Norwich students would like to have in the future; it also allowed the students to gain experience in operating in professional environments.

Several of the invited delegates were professors from other military schools, including the US Military Academy, US Air Force Academy, US Army War College and US Naval War College. Military College professors were not the only academic representative present: there were also representatives from the University of Nebraska, Wayne State College, and Drew University. In addition to the scholars invited, there were representatives from the US Army, National Defense Industrial Association, Carnegie Corporation of New York, and several authors and columnists. Regardless of their diverse career choices, they all shared a common interest: Grand Strategy studies in the US. This group engaged in very intense debate on issues concerning US Political Influence and Military Power, as well as US Foreign Policy Priorities. A conference note was developed and publicized on the topics. The participants universally praised the event and Norwich, with the only criticism being that the timeframe (1½ days) was too short!

Reflecting on the conference, one of Prof. Kashmeri’s students, 2LT Julio Ceasar Basso ’16, USAR, said, “The Center for Studies in War and Peace here at Norwich University was able to bring in some brilliant minds, each with their own expertise. There was no delay in regard to conducting the dialogue, and there were plenty of opportunities to reflect on this dialogue to provide a consensus of thought regardless of background or ideological differences.” Another of Prof. Kashmeri’s students, Matthew McKenzie ’16, agreed. “I felt that overall the conference was a success. The delegates were extremely well qualified, and the diversity of [their] backgrounds allowed for insight into a multitude of areas.”

One of the invited delegates-William Goodman, the Vice President for Policy at the National Defense Industrial Association-gushed about the conference’s attendees and topic choice. “The conference was everything a practitioner could hope for-theoretical enough to step away from the day-to-day concerns of official Washington, but also practical enough to have real meaning for the problems I face every day pertaining to defense budgets and military capabilities.” He added, “Although it is difficult to address a concept like grand strategy and make it fresh, that was exactly what the delegates managed to do, and I was grateful to learn from them and their insights.”

Another invited delegate, Wolfe Schmidt, an International Affairs Consultant and Foreign Policy Association Board Member, struggled with the time constraint, but found the US Grand Strategy Conference to be an enlightening experience overall. Schmidt said, “The agenda was almost too ambitious for the weighty subject; however, the questionnaire was useful in guiding the discourse and the way the plenary sessions were moderated was very productive as well.”

To learn more about the conference, visit the Norwich University US Grand Strategy Conference web site.

Mentors Connect Undergraduates to “Dream Jobs”

By Isabel Weinger Nielsen | College of Liberal Arts

December 5, 2014

“What are your three dream jobs?” That was the question asked of all senior College of Liberal Arts students this fall, and with the assistance of Duane Martin ’67, students are being paired up with Norwich alumni to help them attain those jobs. During last year’s pilot program, Norwich seniors were mentored by alumni employed by such organizations as the US Border Patrol, Vermont State Police, Secret Service, FBI, and Lockheed.

Martin, a member of the COLA Visiting Committee of the Board of Fellows (BoF), was looking for a way to contribute to the future success of Norwich students. He conceived of the idea of starting a mentoring program and presented it to the COLA BoF Visiting Committee and Dean Andrea Talentino, with enthusiastic results. Martin believes that all students can benefit from an alumni mentor, and feels it is important to help students find the jobs they want. Since the University has upwards of 24,000 living alumni (between its undergraduate and graduate programs) who work or have worked in just about every job Norwich students aspire to, he decided to start matching them up.

High-Caliber Students

The mentoring program began as a pilot last year, with a dozen students invited to become mentees. Martin used a personal approach, contacting prospective mentors directly by telephone to explain the program and determine their interests. His tactic worked: The alums Martin approached were incredibly enthusiastic, and went above and beyond Martin’s expectations. Not only did they talk to their mentees, but in many cases they came to campus to meet with them, and even brought students to shadow them in their workplaces. Martin has also been extremely impressed with the quality and caliber of the students. “They are incredibly respectful, bright, and really appreciate the opportunity to have an alumni mentor,” Martin says.

This year, eighteen students have requested mentors, and alumni have responded in a big way. Baylee Annis ’14 is living in Wales and wants to be a writer. She is now in contact with Bob Porier ’66, the author of several history books and numerous published articles. Seth Cecchett ’15 is a history major who aspires to work with the Vermont State Police. He has been paired with Michelle Leblanc ’92, a Vermont State Trooper in the K-9 Unit. Emily Cahill ’15, a Political Science major who hopes to work for Homeland Security, has been introduced to Scott Shelton ’97, a Senior Fellow with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and one of our newest Board of Fellows’ members. Jacob Alderman ’15, an English major with a minor in business administration, will explore a variety of employment opportunities with Robert McElhinney ’04, who works for the US State Department.

Norwich Writers Series Hosts “Kill Shakespeare” Graphic Artist Andy Belanger

By Daphne Larkin | For Immediate Release

NORTHFIELD, Vt.Norwich University’s Fall 2014 Writers Series continues with graphic artist Andy Belanger, collaborator on “Kill Shakespeare,” a 12-issue comic book series starring characters from William Shakespeare, on Friday, November 7, at 4 p.m. in Chaplin Hall gallery.

Belanger will discuss creating art and his life as a comic artist. The Montreal-based freelance cartoonist and illustrator has worked for D.C. Comics and other mainstream comic publishers, as well as the Canadian television and film industry.

Collaborating with co-creators Anthony Del Col, Conor McCreery and others, their “Kill Shakespeare” series garnered rave reviews from the New York Times and mentions on the Colbert Report. In it, Shakespeare’s characters are brought to life in a plot in which they either long to kill the Bard or to protect him.

Belanger’s presentation will be followed by a theatrical performance based on the comic series by Norwich’s Pegasus Players in Dole Auditorium at 8 p.m. on Friday and again on Saturday, Nov. 8 at 8 p.m.

The upcoming events continue the university’s Writers Series, now in its third year, which is presented by the College of Liberal Arts and the Department of English and Communications.

All events in this series are free and open to the public.

 

Norwich University Writers Series Presents “Unschooling” Author Ben Hewitt

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University’s Fall 2014 Writers Series kicks off with Vermont author Ben Hewitt on Thursday, Oct. 16 at 4 p.m. in the Kreitzberg Library Multipurpose Room.

Hewitt will read from his latest book, “Home Grown: Adventures in Parenting Off the Beaten Path, Unschooling, and Reconnecting with the Natural World.” The book is a meditation on childhood, learning and nature, and his experience raising two sons on his family’s 40-acre Vermont farm.

The book draws upon Hewitt’s own unconventional educational path. Raised in a two-room cabin on his family’s 160-acre homestead, Hewitt dropped out of high school at the age of 16 to pursue a “self-designed study program in excessively loud heavy metal music and extreme partying.”

In his 20s, he began writing for major national magazines as a full-time freelance journalist. His journalism has appeared in National Geographic Adventure, Outside, Wired, Discover, Yankee, and the New York Times Magazine, among other outlets.

Hewitt’s three previous books, “Making Supper Safe,” “The Town that Food Saved,” and “Saved,” also address our connection with nature through the lenses of healthy, sustainable and locally sourced food and intentional, simple lifestyles.

The October author reading at Norwich continues the university’s Writers Series, now in its third academic year, which is presented by the College of Liberal Arts and the Department of English and Communications.

All events in this series are free and open to the public. Hewitt’s books will be available for sale, and a signing will follow the reading.

˜˜˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu