Video: Inside Norwich’s C.A.S.A. 802 Tiny House

Video still: Architect and NU Assistant Professor Tolya Stonorov speaks in front of bright red orange door of C.A.S.A. 802 tiny house.
Norwich University Office of Communications

September 27, 2016

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0upWIKBCXQ&w=560&h=315]

Learn more about C.A.S.A. 802, a modular, tiny house project designed and built by faculty and students from Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art, David Crawford School of Engineering, and construction management programs. Energy efficient and sustainably designed, the $30,000 structure offers a modern alternative to mobile homes for young families and can be expanded over time.

Related Article:[gap size=”-15%”]

Ideas @ Work: Tiny House

Ideas @ Work: #23 Building a Better Park

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Norwich faculty David Westerman (geology), Tara Kulkarni (civil engineering), Matthew Lutz (architecture), and Thomas Roberge (physical education) are working with NU students and the Town of Northfield to design and build a community park on reclaimed land along the flood-prone Dog River. Striving to design more than just a pretty public park, the multi-disciplinary town-and-gown team hopes to build a multi-use green space that also educates visitors about the river’s natural flood cycle.

More Ideas@Work:

[columnize][recent_posts count=”33″ category=”ideas@work” no_image=”true” orientation=”vertical”][/columnize]

Ideas @ Work: #13 Summer Camps

Photo of students at the Norwich University GenCyber@NU summer cyber camp

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.

The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

How do you recruit promising high school students to test drive the Norwich experience? Think summer camp. For 15 years now, NU’s Future Leaders Camp has brought teenagers to campus for a two-week, military-leadership adventure camp. Last year, Norwich launched two new summer programs. GenCyber@NU offered a free, weeklong cybersecurity immersion for high school juniors and seniors. The program was cosponsored by the National Security Administration and the National Science Foundation. The School of Architecture + Art also hosted a Summer Design Academy for aspiring architects taught by Norwich faculty and alumni. All three camps return this summer, along with a new offering: an entrepreneur boot camp hosted by NU’s School of Business and Management.

More Ideas@Work:

[columnize][recent_posts count=”33″ category=”ideas@work” no_image=”true” orientation=”vertical”][/columnize]

Ideas @ Work: #8 CityLAB: Berlin

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BEHef432Io&w=560&h=315]

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

NU’s CityLAB: Berlin microcampus provides students from Norwich and other universities a life-changing opportunity to explore and experience the German capital—one of the Europe’s most dynamic cities with a population of 3.5 million. World-class faculty offer courses in Architecture + Art, History, Political Science, and Studies in War and Peace that challenge and inspire.

More Ideas@Work:

[columnize][recent_posts count=”33″ category=”ideas@work” no_image=”true” orientation=”vertical”][/columnize]

Norwich offers summer camps for architecture and cybersecurity

Photo of students at the Norwich University GenCyber@NU summer cyber camp

~Camps give students the opportunity to learn at a top cybersecurity program and at the only accredited architecture school in northern New England.~

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

March 29, 2016

Norwich University is offering two summer camps led by standout Norwich faculty, alumni and students for rising high school juniors and seniors.

The first program, GenCyber@NU, is a free, U.S. government-sponsored camp for cyber security and cyber defense. In it, students will be provided the hardware and software to build a mini computer, which they will keep at the end of the program. The week-long, pre-college program, to be held from July 17-23, is designed for students interested in information security, digital forensics, cyberattack defense, and personal online protection.

The camp is funded by a grant from the National Security Agency and National Science Foundation and is FREE for attending students. All expenses for the week-long program, including tuition, room and board, field trips, and other program fees are covered at no cost to GenCyber@NU participants.

Applications are due April 15. Interested students should submit a letter of interest, a letter of recommendation and an unofficial high school transcript via email to gencyber@norwich.edu. For more information, go here: http://profschools.norwich.edu/business/gen-cyber-camp/.

Norwich University undergraduate and online graduate programs are consistently ranked among the best in the nation for cyber security education and are certified by the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security as Centers of Academic Excellence (CAE). Norwich University has been a member of the National Science Foundation’s Cyber Corps Scholarship for Service program since 2002.

The second program is facilitated by Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art, which will hold a Summer Design Academy from July 10-16. During the week-long program, students will grapple with design thinking and explore the communication of their ideas through various media and hands-on projects.

Workshops, lectures, demonstrations and off-campus experiences complement daily design studios. Students will gain a broader view of the field while developing skills and portfolio materials to add to their college applications. Students will also be advised on the college admission and portfolio-building processes.

Local designer and Norwich alumnus Joshua Chafe of Truex Cullins in Burlington, Vt. will join School of Architecture + Art faculty to provide design guidance and critique as students learn to design and build full-scale structures and spaces during studio time.

The cost, including room and board, is $750. Applications will be accepted through April 25. For more information, go here: http://profschools.norwich.edu/architectureart/summer-camp-front-page/

The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture. Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is the only NAAB accredited architecture school in northern New England.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Architect, Educator and Community Leader Margaret Griffin to Speak at Norwich Architecture + Art’s Lecture Series

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

March 17, 2016

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art presents “Back to Basics or Migrant Form?” a lecture by Margaret Griffin, FAIA, co-founder of the Los Angeles based firm Griffin Enright Architects.

A continuation of the spring 2016 lecture series, this event will be held on Friday, Mar. 25, at 4 p.m. in the Chaplin Hall Gallery and is free and open to the public.

Griffin is an architect, educator, and community leader who co-founded Griffin Enright Architects in an effort to establish a collaborative, creative, and forward-thinking practice.

The firm’s fluid and dynamic work combines innovative design and experimentation in a desire to explore cultural complexities relative to the built environment. Griffin Enright Architects’ work has been acknowledged on a local, national, and global scale receiving dozens of awards for design excellence from the American Institute of Architecture (AIA) and the American Architecture Award from the Chicago Athenaeum.

Griffin’s design education includes both a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Syracuse University and a Master of Architecture degree from University of Virginia. Upon graduating, she was granted a fellowship from the American Academy in Rome to investigate the relationship between urban form and landforms, a subject she continues to examine in her architectural practice through landscape design.

While busy running her emerging practice, Griffin is also a practicing Professor at Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), with twenty-two years of experience teaching at universities including Syracuse University, University of Southern California, and University of California, Los Angeles.

Griffin is also an active and participating member of her community, committing her time to service as an appointed member of Santa Monica’s Architectural Review Board and previously as a member of the AIA Board of Directors, Los Angeles chapter.

The NU School of Architecture + Art Lecture Series is supported by a generous grant from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation. For more than 10 years, the Byrne Foundation has partnered with Norwich University to bring eminent national and international architects, designers, artists, and writers to campus. Events are free and open to the public.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art to host design innovator Eli Gould

Office of Communications

Nov. 4, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art continues its 2015-16 Lecture Series with local architect Eli Gould, founder of design firm Ironwood Brand.

Gould will speak this coming Friday, Nov. 6 at 3 p.m. in the Chaplin Hall Gallery about his career as an architect and the innovations his firm brings to projects in the building industry.

Gould founded his firm Ironwood Brand in 1994 as a “Timber/Mill/Design/Build” firm. Based in Brattleboro, Vt., it offers custom prefab and installation of sophisticated timber designs. Ironwood Brand has designed and built some of the highest performing buildings in Vermont and is consistently sought after for unique design practice in challenging situations.

Gould’s firm is also developing three new companies specializing in advanced forestry and larger scale/lower cost prefabricated housing.

A licensed architect and graduate of Yale University, Gould began his career of high performance design practice at leading green-design firm William Maclay Architects in 2000. Gould went on to be involved in major projects, such as the Open_1 Prototype with MIT and Crotched Mountain Rehabilitation Center (CMRC), and was involved in the startup of Charpentes Montmorency, a timber frame manufacturing company for high-end design.

The NU School of Architecture + Art Lecture Series is supported by a generous grant from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation. For more than 10 years, the Byrne Foundation has partnered with Norwich to bring eminent national and international architects, designers, artists, and writers to campus. Events are free and open to the public.

The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation is a philanthropic organization that supports cancer research, education, volunteerism, and other charitable endeavors.

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is the only National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited architecture school in northern New England.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art to Host Renowned French Architect Jose Oubrerie

Photo portrait of French architecture Oubrerie against primary color blocks
NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

October 15, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt.Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art continues its 2015-16 Lecture Series with a presentation by renowned French architect Jose Oubrerie on Friday, Oct. 23 at 4 p.m. in Chaplin Hall Gallery.

An author and professor emeritus at Ohio State University’s Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture, Oubrerie was the last protégé of Charles-Edouard Jeanneret-Gris, a.k.a. Le Corbusier—one of the pioneers of modern architecture and design.

During his presentation, which is free and open to the public, Oubrerie will speak about his life and career.

Oubrerie studied at the School of Fine Arts in Nantes, France, before focusing on architecture at the Ecole Nationale Superiéure des Beaux-Arts in the 1950s.

He began his professional career working as an assistant to Le Corbusier in 1957 and continued until 1965, collaborating on several of Le Corbusier’s last buildings. These included the Brazil Pavilion, Hotel d’Orsay, the Strasbourg Convention Center, the Olivetti offices and factories in Milan, the Venice Hospital, the Zurichhorn Pavillion, and the Firminy Church. Oubrerie became a registered architect in 1970 after establishing his own practice and home in Paris.

Oubrerie’s résumé encompasses many prestigious works of his own. These include

  • the Miller Residence in Lexington, Kentucky, which received the Honor Award for Architectural Excellence from AIA Kentucky,
  • the French Cultural Center in Damascus, Syria, which won the Quality of Public Constructions Prize of the Ministry of Construction, Paris,
  • and the reconstruction of Le Corbusier’s L’Esprit Nouveau exhibit hall in Bologna, Italy.

Oubrerie also directed the realization of Le Corbusiers final vision, the church of Saint-Pierre de Firminy in France. Completed in 2006, it is considered a masterpiece of concrete, form, and light.

The NU School of Architecture + Art Lecture Series is supported by a generous grant from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation. For more than 10 years, the Byrne Foundation has partnered with Norwich University to bring eminent national and international architects, designers, artists, and writers to campus. Events are free and open to the public.

The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation is a philanthropic organization that supports cancer research, education and volunteerism, among many charitable endeavors.

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is the only National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredited architecture school in northern New England.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Student Research: A 3,000-Mile Architectural Journey Through the Desert Southwest

In June, senior architecture major Keith Stipe joined 27 other Norwich University undergraduate Summer Research Fellows who undertook in-depth research projects across the arts, sciences or professional fields. Awarded by the university’s Office of Academic Research, the competitive, six- and ten-week fellowships are funded by university endowments dedicated to supporting student academic investigation.
Norwich University Office of Communications

August 24, 2015

This summer, senior architecture major Keith Stipe toured the desert southwest to explore ancient and modern examples of earthen and rammed earth architecture and to speak to leading architects in the field.
keith_stipe_portrait

Beginning in Denver, Colo., Stipe drove some 3,000 miles over the course of three weeks, exploring sites in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Arizona.

Building styles ranged from thousand-year-old kivas built by the Pueblo peoples at Chaco National Historic Park in Chaco, New Mexico, to modern sculptor Paolo Soleri’s Cosanti home and studio in Paradise Valley, Arizona.

“One of the reasons this research is relevant and important is that even in our current day, a third to half of the world’s population lives in earthen buildings,” Stipe says.

“There’s a huge population of the world that relies on the availability and the easy use of earthen building materials. So it’s something that’s worth continuing to explore and develop in the future.”

His first stop was the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., designed by I.M. Pei, a concrete structure that uses soil and pigment to make a visual connection to the surrounding Colorado landscape.

Other sites included the 30,000-square-foot PERA office building in Sante Fe, the largest rammed earth building in the southwest; Georgia O’Keefe’s Abiquiu, NM, home and studio; and the Lemuria Earthship, an off-the-grid rammed earth home near Taos, New Mexico.

At each site, Stipe studied the architecture’s technical and aesthetic qualities. He sketched site layouts, photographed architectural elements, and measured wall thicknesses to estimate thermal mass and passive heating and cooling abilities.

The aspiring architect also observed the buildings’ relationships to place and landscape, noting how the structures earthen building materials provided a poetic connection to the landscape.

In Arizona, Stipe interviewed influential rammed earth architect Eddie Jones.

Danny Sagan, an associate professor of architecture and program director for NU’s School of Architecture + Art, served as Stipe’s research advisor. “Architecture is uniquely difficult to study in that many of the examples we use to teach the principles of the subject are not located in Vermont,” he says.

He adds that architecture of place must be derived from regionally appropriate building technologies. Stipe’s trip into the arid Southwest allowed him to explore architecture informed by different influences.

“By traveling into an new environment, Keith was able to see the subject of architecture with new eyes,” Sagan says. “Every architecture student should travel to see architecture in a place very different than the places they know. It makes their studies much broader and therefore much more relevant.”

Stipe documented his trip via social media and photography. He plans to produce a book as his final research product, one that synthesizes his visual impressions with research findings and analysis.

Stipe’s research budget of $3,940, which covered food, lodging, travel expenses, and a new digital SLR camera, were covered by his Summer Research Fellowship stipend.

“Architecture is an art which arises not only from an instinctual need for warmth or shelter, but also from a human desire to synthesize and create at a level which is in harmony with landscape and environment,” Stipe notes.

Modern building approaches often involve demolishing a landscape, building suburbs, then replanting trees—a process that doesn’t acknowledge place, he says. “We try to change the environment to fit our perceptions or needs, rather than using the environment as a tool [for] showing us how to live in an area.”

His fellowship now complete, Stipe will spend the fall semester studying architecture and design in Berlin, Germany, at Norwich University’s City Lab: Berlin micro campus.

Related Articles on Undergraduate Summer Research Fellows:

Norwich in the News: “Aspiring Architects Start Building Their Futures”

Norwich University Office of Communications

July 13, 2015

Burlington-based CBS affiliate WCAX-TV recently profiled Norwich University’s Summer Design Academy, a week-long residential architecture and design program for high school students sponsored by NU’s School of Architecture + Art.

“The budding builders are creating things large and small, tackling topics like scale, proportion, light and design, in a mix of studio, seminar and field experiences,” WCAX’s Keith McGilvery reported.

Burlington-based designer and Norwich alum Josh Chafe co-directed the design program. He told WCAX that Norwich’s Summer Design Academy offered participants experience relevant beyond the field of architecture, including how to work in a group, create on fly, and reject ideas without guilt in order to start over.

Watch the full video news feature here.

Photo by Norwich University.