Norwich to Host 5K Fun Run/Walk to Mark JROTC Anniversary

National race organizers hope to enlist over 350,000 runners around the world and set a new Guinness World Record
Norwich University Office of Communications

March 30, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – To help celebrate the 99th anniversary of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) and Junior ROTC (JROTC), Norwich University will host a 5K fun run on Saturday, April 25. Check-in begins at 10:30 a.m. at Shapiro Field House for the race’s 12 p.m. start time.

The race is part of a global effort by JROTC to break the Guinness World Record for the “most participants in a 5K run at multiple locations” to celebrate the 99th anniversary of the founding of the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps.

The passage of the National Defense Act In 1916 established the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) and Junior ROTC in the United States. Norwich University is considered the home of ROTC and its founder, Captain Alden Partridge, the father of ROTC.

JROTC is a military-structured high school program designed to educate high school students in leadership roles while cultivating an appreciation of the benefits of active citizenship. The JROTC curriculum emphasizes academics, citizenship, character development, leadership development, physical fitness and community service.

Registration for the fun run is free and open here. Pre-registration is required.

Check-in begins on Saturday, April 25, at 10:30 a.m. at Shapiro Field House with the run beginning promptly at noon.

For additional information and a video on this historic event please visit www.JROTC5KRun.com.

Media Contact:

Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
dlarkin@norwich.edu
802-485-2886 or 595-3613(m)

Follow us on Twitter @NorwichNews                            
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Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu   

Norwich to Hold 20th Annual Colby Military Writers’ Symposium

Public Panel to Address the Topic: “Cyber Warfare and Privacy: How Do We Keep the Balance Between the Rights of Citizens and the Security of the Nation?”
Norwich University Office of Communications

Updated March 30, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University will host the 2015 William E. Colby Military Writers’ Symposium on Wednesday and Thursday, April 8-9, hosting Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Philip Caputo, among other literary luminaries.

The symposium, which is free and open to the public and marks its 20th anniversary this year, celebrates the best in military writing, books and ideas.

It brings together some of the nation’s leading military writers, historians and thinkers, who gather for a two-day residency on the campus of the country’s oldest private military college to share their work and discuss current affairs and military issues.

The William E. Colby Award winning book is also formally recognized during the symposium. The accolade, which includes a $5,000 cash prize, honors the best work of military nonfiction or fiction of the year by a first-time author.

This year’s winner is historian and U.S. Army War College professor Colonel Douglas V. Mastriano, PhD, for his book “Alvin York: A New Biography of the Hero of the Argonne.”

The theme of this year’s Colby symposium is “Cyber Warfare and Privacy: How Do We Keep the Balance Between the Rights of Citizens and the Security of the Nation?” Norwich University undergraduate and online graduate programs are consistently ranked among the best in the nation for cyber security education and are certified by the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security as Centers of Academic Excellence (CAE).

The panel discussion, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for Thursday, April 9, from 1-3 p.m. in Plumley Armory.

This year’s panelists include:

  • Author and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Philip Caputo. A guest of the inaugural symposium, Caputo has written 15 books, including two memoirs, five nonfiction books and eight novels including his acclaimed memoir of Vietnam, “A Rumor of War.”
  • Cheri Caddy, Director for Cybersecurity Policy Integration and Outreach, National Security Council, the White House. Caddy reports to the special advisor to the president for cybersecurity and shapes national policies related to improving cyber protections for federal agencies, state governments, the private sector and foreign partners. Caddy is a 1990 Norwich alumna.
  • Lewis “Bob” Sorley, PhD, a third-generation graduate of the United States Military Academy who has served on the faculties at West Point and the Army War College. He is the former CIA chief of policy and plans division and the author of several books including the Pulitzer Prize-nominated “A Better War: The Unexamined Victories and Final Tragedy of America’s Last Years in Vietnam.”

Founded in 1996 by Carlo D´Este and W.E.B. Griffin, the Colby Symposium has brought more than 100 authors, historians, and filmmakers to Norwich University in Northfield, Vt. The symposium is the only program of its kind at an American university.

“The William E. Colby Military Writers’ Symposium aims to expose Norwich students, faculty, alumni and the public to the works and views of authors, historians and national figures to educate, enlighten, and inspire,” D’Este says.

“Participants come to Norwich hoping to make a difference in the lives of our students through their interaction in a variety of lectures, social functions and lively in-class sessions. They also come to further the debate on current issues,” he adds.

The Colby Military Writers Symposium is frequently covered by C-Span Book TV. Last year, C-Span broadcast interviews with Colby panelists by journalist Mark Johnson of WDEV radio. Watch the video here.

Norwich Students Make Colorful Splash at Hindu Holi Festival

Students at Norwich University throw colored powered to celebrate Holi, the Hindu festival of colors and love. The March 19, 2015 event was organized by the NU Intercultural Student Organization as a fundraiser. Photographs by Mark Collier, Norwich University Office of Communications

Photo Gallery:

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Smithsonian Aviation Curator to Speak at Norwich about Lincoln Balloon Corps

Norwich University Office of Communications

March 12, 2015 

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University’s Sullivan Museum and History Center, the state’s only Smithsonian Affiliate, will host Dr. Tom Crouch, Senior Curator of Aeronautics at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, for a lunch-and-learn on Wednesday, April 8 at noon in Milano Ballroom, located in Roberts Hall.

Crouch’s presentation, “Mr. Lincoln’s Air Force:  Military Aeronautics in the Civil War,” is free and open to the public. A light lunch will be served, and a book-signing will follow.

Abraham Lincoln held a life-long fascination with technology and during the Civil War seldom missed an opportunity to investigate new weapons or innovations. New England balloonist T.S.C. Lowe was able to demonstrate to Lincoln the role that observation balloons might play in providing improved reconnaissance for the Union Army. The President not only encouraged Lowe’s plan to form a Balloon Corps to serve with the Army of the Potomac, but intervened on his behalf when military officials proved less than enthusiastic about the experiment. With the assistance of the President, Lowe was able to create and equip the Balloon Corps, which saw extensive service from 1861 to 1863.

Copies of Crouch’s books “Lighter-Than-Air: An Illustrated History of Balloons and Airships,” and “The Bishop’s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright,” will be available for sale at the event.

Crouch holds a BA (1962) from Ohio University, an MA (1968) from Miami University and a PhD (1976) from the Ohio State University (all in history) and has been a Smithsonian employee since 1974. He is the author or editor of a number of books and many articles for both popular magazines and scholarly journals. These include “Eagle Aloft: Two Centuries of the Balloon in America” and “Wings: A History of Aviation from Kites to the Space Age.”

Crouch has also received a number of book awards including a 1989 Christopher Award, a literary prize recognizing “significant artistic achievement in support of the highest values of the human spirit,” for “The Bishop’s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright.” His book “Wings: A History of Aviation From Kites to the Space Age” won the AIAA Gardner-Lasser Literature Prize for 2005, an award presented to the best book selected in that year from all books in the field of aerospace history published in the last five years.

For more information, call the Sullivan Museum at (802) 485-2183, or email smhc@norwich.edu.  RSVPs encouraged, but not required.

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Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu  

Climate Change Increasing Security Threat, Former Army Chief Says

In a Todd Lecture Series speech at Norwich, GEN Gordon R. Sullivan said global warming is spurring a spate of growing risks to US interests
Office of Communications

February 6, 2015

Former US Army Chief of Staff Gordon R. Sullivan NU ’59 said climate change is spurring more instability around the world and that the security risks from global warming are advancing faster than expected.

“We are not prepared for the pace of climate change,” Sullivan said, noting that it will impact US military readiness and national power, particularly domestic infrastructure.

Already the US has been caught flat-footed by the speed of melting sea ice in the Arctic. Russia, Canada and Denmark are posturing for control of oil reserves beneath the North Pole. But the US lacks sufficient ice-hardened ships and communications and navigation gear to respond to crises there, Sullivan said.

Elsewhere, shifting weather patterns will stress the world’s ability to meet regional demand for food and fresh water, leading to further political unrest and potential mass transnational migrations. Sullivan said this is particularly true in Africa and Asia, where the human population is exploding.

Climate change will place more demand on the US military to respond to national and international crises, challenge readiness and send troops into harsher operating environments, Sullivan said.

The retired four-star general made the remarks yesterday during a speech focused on climate change and national security at his alma mater, kicking off the first Todd Lecture Series event of 2015.

Established in 2008, the free public lecture series aims to bring thought-provoking speakers to inform and inspire the Norwich campus and central Vermont communities.

Sullivan served as the 32nd Army Chief of Staff under Presidents Bush and Clinton, where he helped reengineer and downsize the US Army in the wake of the Cold War, leading it into the Information Age while facing a 40 percent budget cut.

Since 2006, Sullivan has served on the Military Advisory Board of the CNA Corp., a government-funded nonprofit military research organization.

In 2007, the panel of 16 retired generals and admirals identified climate change as a “threat multiplier,” particularly in fragile areas of the globe.

The board issued a second report last year, concluding that climate change poses an accelerating risk to national security.

For example, it linked the devastating drought of 2010 in the US, Russia and China to a steep decline in world wheat production that sparked a series of cascading effects. Bread prices spiked in Tunisia, Egypt and other wheat-importing countries in Northern Africa. The shortages and massive price increases led to food riots and unrest that precipitated the Arab Spring revolutions.

“While there were deep underlying causes for overthrow of several of the governments, the catalyst that set this off can be directly linked to weather and climate change,” Sullivan said.

Sullivan’s speech outlined the effects climate change is having on four major areas related to US national security: global instability, melting Arctic sea ice, US military readiness and US power.

Sullivan gave a synopsis of recent climate change trends and how they might destabilize regimes or regions in the future.

He noted that in January, both NASA and NOAA reported that 2014 was the warmest year on record since 1880, that the ten warmest years on record have occurred since 2000, and that eight of the ten costliest US storms have occurred in the past decade.

“Globally, we have seen recent prolonged drought act as a factor driving both spikes in food prices and mass displacement of populations, each contributing to instability and eventual conflict,” he said.

“For example, five years of drought in Syria decimated farmers’ crops and forced millions to migrate to urban areas. These drought refugees found little in the way of jobs and were quickly disenfranchised with the government,” Sullivan said.

“The result is civil war in Syria.”

Sullivan said additional impacts can be seen in unprecedented wildfires and the effect of rising sea levels on low-lying island nations, some of which are planning whole-sale evacuation.

“Over the coming decades, I think those areas already stressed by water and food shortage and poor governance—these span the globe—will present the greatest near term threat for conflict,” he said.

“In the longer term, many of these areas will be threatened by rising sea level.”

Sullivan, who serves as Chairman of the Board of Trustees at Norwich, closed his presentation by challenging Norwich students to lead the nation in tackling the complex problems associated with climate change.

NASA Astronaut to Speak During Norwich’s Spring Todd Lecture Series

Space Shuttle and International Space Station veteran Michael E. Fossum will speak about his 193 days in space and NASA research
January 27, 2014

 

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University continues its spring Todd Lecture Series with a lecture titled, “Report from the International Space Station,’’ a presentation by a decorated NASA Astronaut Michael E. Fossum on Thursday February 26, 2015 at 7 p.m. in Dole Auditorium, Webb Hall.

A veteran of three space flights, Fossum has logged seven space walks and over 193 days in space aboard the Space Shuttle and International Space Station.

Fossum will discuss his work aboard the orbiting national laboratory during his lecture, which is sponsored by Norwich University’s College of Science and Mathematics. A Q&A will follow the presentation.

Fossum received his commission in the U.S. Air Force at Texas A&M University in 1980. He completed graduate work at the Air Force Institute of Technology the following year before the Air Force assigned him to support NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. In 1985, he graduated from test pilot school at Edwards Air Force Base, California, and served as a Flight Test Engineer in the F-16 Test Squadron. Fossum resigned from active duty in 1992 to work for NASA and retired as a Colonel from the USAF Reserves in 2010. He has logged more than 1,800 hours in 35 different aircraft.

In 1993, he joined NASA as a systems engineer with primary responsibilities to evaluate the Russian Soyuz spacecraft for use as a space station emergency escape vehicle. Later in 1993, Fossum was selected to represent NASA’s Flight Crew Operations Directorate in an extensive redesign of the International Space Station (ISS).

He was selected by NASA as an astronaut candidate in 1998. After eight years of intensive training, he made his first space flight, traveling aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on a 13-day mission in July 2006 to supply the International Space Station. During that mission, Fossum made three space walks, called extravehicular activities (EVAs).

Fossum flew aboard Discovery again in 2008 with the STS-124 crew that delivered Japan’s Kibo lab module to the ISS. He returned to space in 2011 as part of Expedition 28 and served as commander of the ISS. His final EVA during this mission was the seventh in his career for a total of 48 hours, 32 minutes of EVA time, placing him seventh on the all-time list for cumulative EVA time.

Norwich University’s Todd Lecture Series is named in honor of Army Maj. Gen. Russell Todd (USA Ret.) and his wife, Carol, in gratitude for their dedicated service to the university. Todd ’50, serves as Norwich President Emeritus. With this series, Norwich brings the nation’s foremost thought leaders drawn from business, politics, the arts, science, the military and other arenas to its Northfield campus. All events are free and open to the public.

For more information please check the Todd Lecture Series website or call (802) 485-2633.

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu    

New Civil War Exhibits Open at Sullivan Museum

Fall of Richmond Illustration by Currier and Ives
Norwich University museum celebrates opening of fifth and final exhibition in Civil War series and related show by artist Kara Walker
January 15, 2015

 

NORTHFIELD, Vt.–Norwich University’s Sullivan Museum and History Center invites the public to celebrate the opening of a new exhibit, “1865, Out of the Ashes: Assassination, Reconstruction, and Healing the Nation,” with a reception on Friday, January 23 from 5-7 p.m.

The exhibit, which focuses on the aftermath of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, the rehabilitation and restoration of the South, and efforts to unify the country, is the fifth and final exhibition in the museum’s series commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

A centerpiece of the new exhibition is a unique and rare firearm recently acquired by the Sullivan Museum and History Center: a Spencer repeating rifle. Possibly tested by President Lincoln himself, the weapon had remained in private hands for several generations and will now be on public view for the first time since the Civil War. The rifle was itself an important part of Civil War history. Adopted by Union troops, it allowed for more accurate and rapid firing. The Spencer rifle now on view was an early issue, originally given to Lincoln by the manufacturer and later gifted by Lincoln to Gideon Welles, NU’1826, in recognition of his Civil War service as Secretary of the Navy.

In addition to the rifle, historical objects from Ford’s Theater, a brass cannon used during the Civil War and period currency loaned by the Hon. John W. Walter will be included in the exhibition.

Kara Walker Prints

The museum is also pleased to concurrently present a separate complementary exhibition of pictorial works by contemporary African American artist Kara Walker, made possible through the generous support of Tawani Foundation Endowment Funds.

“Kara Walker: Juxtaposition, Contemporary Specters, and Harper’s Pictorial History of the Civil War,” features contemporary works on loan from Mount Holyoke College.  The artist combined her signature overlays of black silhouettes with historic lithography to produce poignant and sharp commentary on stereotypes found in the nation’s history of slavery, Jim Crow and segregation that still infiltrate present stereotypes.

Both exhibits will remain on display until July 31, 2015. Visitors exploring the museum will find a blackboard to engage in ongoing discussion about the legacies of the Civil War and Reconstruction that still affect society today.

Plan Your Visit

The Sullivan Museum and History Center is a Smithsonian Affiliate, the only such museum in the state of Vermont. (See related article.) The museum is located on the Northfield campus of Norwich University. It is open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. during the academic year. There is no charge for admission to the museum. For more information call 802.485.2183 or visit the museum’s website (academics.norwich.edu/museum/) or Facebook page (www.facebook.com/SullivanMuseum).

Robust Slate for School of Architecture + Art 2014-15 Lecture Series

Upcoming speakers include Michael Gericke, partner at global design powerhouse Pentagram, and Kill Shakespeare graphic artist Andy Belanger.
By Tolya Stonorov & Timothy Parker, Assistant Professors
School of Architecture + Art

 
October 22, 2014

Over homecoming weekend, the School of Architecture + Art kicked off its annual lecture series, supported in part by the Jack & Dorothy Byrne Foundation, with a Norwich focus. Two students who received the prestigious Summer Research Fellowship, Shaili Patel and Taylor Davidson, each presented their research. They were followed by a lecture from Norwich architecture alumnus Jason Iacobucci, principal of Solus 4, an architecture, interior, and planning design and research firm which operates as a core group collaborative on a global platform.

The lecture series continued this October when Michael Gericke, a partner at Pentagram, self-described as the world’s largest independent design consultancy, who spoke on October 10. With offices in London, New York, San Francisco, Berlin and Austin, Pentagram markets itself by stating, “We design everything: architecture, interiors, products, identities, publications, posters, books, exhibitions, websites and digital installations.”

Co-sponsored by the Norwich University Writers Series, Andy Belanger (Andy B.), the graphic artist for the comic book series Kill Shakespeare will talk about creating art and life as a comic artist at the Chaplin Hall Gallery on Friday, Nov. 7 at 4 p.m. Kill Shakespeare is a 12-issue comic book that deals with William Shakespeare’s characters and Shakespeare himself. These famous characters are brought to life and they either long to kill Shakespeare or to protect him. The first 12 issues of Kill Shakespeare were adapted into a live staged reading format in 2011, which the Norwich Pegasus Players will perform on Friday and Saturday, November 7-8, at 7:30 p.m. in Dole Auditorium.

Later on November 14, Whitney Sander of the international-award-winning Sander Architects joins us from Los Angeles. Sander’s work includes a Hybrid House that “uses components of prefab technology to create homes that are custom designed for each client. Homes that are not only green but also very high design.” This focus on prefab and green design choreographs well with Norwich’s recent completion of the Delta T-90 Solar Decathlon house.

In February, we are thrilled to host Michael Cotton, a senior architect with Snøhetta, New York, who will discuss a newly completed project. Snøhetta’s designs are cutting edge, internationally recognized as among the best in the world. Their work varies in scope from architecture to landscape to branding.

On March 27, the School of Architecture + Art co-sponsors a symposium with the Vermont Arts Council on modern identity in architectural history, theory and practice. Prof. Vladimir Kulić, Prof. Monica Penick and Norwich Assistant Professor of History and Theory of Architecture and Art Prof. Timothy Parker are co-editors of Sanctioning Modernism: Architecture and the Making of Postwar Identities. The trio will convene and join a panel of practicing architects in a Sanctioning Modernism symposium that seeks to reflect on how modern identity touches present-day clients, architects’ own design principles and related contexts.

Norwich architecture alumnus Gavin L. Engler, an associate with Carol A. Wilson Architect in Falmouth, Me., whose work has been published and widely recognized for its excellence in design, will give the final lecture of the school year on April 10. Engler was named one of Maine’s “Forty Under 40” in recognition of his commitment to leadership, professional excellence and community involvement.

The School of Architecture + Art heartily invites you to join us for any or all of these events, which are all held in Chaplin Hall Gallery.