Norwich University Students Win NASA BIG Idea Engineering Design Challenge with Inflatable Solar Array for Mars

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

March 9, 2018

A team of five Norwich University students led by Mechanical Engineering Professor Brian Bradke has won NASA’s 2018 Breakthrough, Innovative and Game-changing (BIG) Idea Engineering Design Challenge with its Norwich Inflatable Mars Solar Array (NIMSA).

According to NASA: “In 2017, NASA called for proposals for large power systems that could be used on the surface of Mars. Because these systems need to be in place before humans ever arrive on the Red Planet, teams were required to propose robotic or autonomous solutions for deployment and sustainable operation.”

This is the third year NASA has put on the challenge, which “enlists university teams from across the nation to develop creative solutions to some of the agency’s most relevant challenges,” according to a NASA press release.

“I am proud of our team’s work and performance at the competition,” David Crawford School of Engineering Director Stephen Fitzhugh said. “They are a wonderful example of Norwich students displaying the Norwich value of ‘conceiving as well as executing’.”

Along with Bradke, the Norwich team is comprised of Mechanical Engineering majors: Tyler Azure, of Lino Lakes, Minn. (pictured far right); Nicole Goebel, of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada (pictured second from the right); Laurie King, of Waddington, N.Y. (pictured second from the left); and Braeden Ostepchuk, of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada (pictured far left); and Electrical and Computer Engineering major Charlene Huyler, of Westport, Mass (pictured, center).

King, Goebel and Ostepchuk are also student-athletes who compete for Norwich’s championship hockey teams. Ostepchuk was a member of Norwich’s 2017 national championship men’s hockey team, while Goebel and King are three victories away from winning the women’s hockey program’s second national championship.

“I am continually impressed by our Norwich students,” Bradke said. “They are knowledgeable, well-spoken, motivated, creative and well-rounded young adults that are capable of undertaking any challenge on Earth (or for that matter, Mars!)  I’d put our students up against any other university, without reservation.”

The four other teams in the competition were: The University of Colorado Boulder, which came in second place; Princeton; Texas A&M University; and The University of Virginia.

About the Challenge:

The BIG Idea Challenge is sponsored by NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate’s Game Changing Development Program, and managed by the National Institute of Aerospace. For more information about NASA’s Space Technology Mission directorate, go to: http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech. For more information about the 2018 Big Idea Challenge, please visit: http://bigidea.nianet.org/.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich University’s Todd Lecture Panel Culminates Yearlong Focus on Innovation

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

April 13, 2017

Norwich University presents three nationally and internationally known innovators from the fields of creative design, technological design, and design for social good, for a Todd Lecture panel discussion on Thursday, April 27, in Plumley Armory, which follows a showcase of innovation. The “Making Innovation Symposium” is free and open to the public.

Please join us at 6 p.m. for the “Making Innovation Showcase,” a curated exhibition of student academic and creative research that is the culmination of a yearlong focus on innovation.

The showcase will be followed by a 7 p.m. Todd Lecture panel discussion, “To Act As Well As To Think: Leadership, Innovation, and the Creative Impulse,” an evening with Michael Jager, Natalie Jeremijenko, and William Kamkwamba. The panel will be moderated by entrepreneur Jonathan Speed, a 2014 graduate of Norwich’s Master of Arts in Military History. Two awards will be presented to students at the conclusion of the evening in recognition of work that exemplifies leadership through innovative thought as well as practice.

The Making Innovation Symposium is the culminating event of a series of experiential learning exercises focused on the themes of leadership and innovation. Throughout the year, six co-curricular NU IDEA Design Challenges engaged nearly 100 students to creatively solve real world problems with their peers. The innovation challenges further Norwich’s goal of creating a culture of innovation, entrepreneurship, and creative thinking on campus. The final challenge of the term will be facilitated by Jonathan Speed on Wednesday, April 26, at 4 p.m. in the Kreitzberg Library Todd Multipurpose Room.

While panelists are on campus, Norwich will seek their input regarding emerging fields, critical path skills for near-future leaders, as well as recommendations about curriculum to strengthen entrepreneurship-related courses. Panelists will visit with students enrolled in a range of courses across campus, including biology, engineering, nursing, English, writing, and architecture. They will additionally interact with students affiliated with the Center for Global Resilience & Security and the Entrepreneurship Club.

The panelists are:

MICHAEL JAGER

Michael Jager is founding Partner/CCO of Solidarity of Unbridled Labour (formerly Jager DiPaola Kemp (JDK) Design). For more than 25 years, Jager has been creating and collaborating with international brands, driven by the idea that design distinction matters most. Guided by Ezra Pound’s simply but elegantly stated principle, “Make it new,” his work for brands such as Burton Snowboards, Seventh Generation, Xbox, Nike, Levis, and Patagonia is recognized worldwide.

NATALIE JEREMIJENKO (pictured above)

In 2014, Natalie Jeremijenko was awarded the VIDA Art and Artificial Life International Awards Pioneer Prize, “for her consistently brilliant portfolio of work over the past two decades.” Named one of 2013’s Most Innovative People, one of the most influential women in technology in 2011, and one of the inaugural top young innovators by MIT Technology Review, Jeremijenko directs the Environmental Health Clinic and is an Associate Professor in the Visual Art Department at New York University. She holds degrees in biochemistry, engineering, neuroscience, and history and philosophy of science.

WILLIAM KAMKWAMBA

William Kamkwamba is the co-author with Bryan Mealer of the New York Times best-selling book “The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope.” A remarkable success story about the power of human ingenuity in the face of crippling odds, Kamkwamba’s story shares his vision for “a new kind of Africa, a place of leaders instead of victims, a home of innovation rather than charity.”

JONATHAN SPEED (Moderator)

An alumnus of Brown University—where he is an emeritus trustee and board member of the Brown Entrepreneurship Program—and Norwich University, Jonathan Speed has 30+ years of business development, finance, and start-up experience with companies in the finance/private equity, life sciences, and technology sectors. He is currently the CFO at Versal Group, a San Francisco-based eLearning company. During his twenty years in the Bay Area, Jonathan has advised non-profits, entrepreneurial organizations, and serves on the boards of four start-up companies. In fall 2017, Jonathan will launch 1790 Media—a student-oriented media platform created to expand entrepreneurial and innovation education, knowledge, and mentorship to today’s diverse student population.

The Making Innovation Symposium is hosted by the Colleges of Professional Schools, Science and Mathematics, and Liberal Arts. It is a capstone event in Norwich’s Year of Leadership, the third of a five-year $100M campaign to transform academics at Norwich University in celebration of Norwich’s upcoming bicentennial.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Top 10 Norwich University News Stories of 2016

Norwich CSIA majors, faculty and alumni stand in front of Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif., on the eve of Super Bowl 50
Norwich University Office of Communications

December 14, 2016

It’s that time of year—a chance to highlight just some of the many accomplishments of Norwich University’s outstanding students, alumni, faculty, and staff during 2016. While they may make taking on difficult challenges and achieving distinction look effortless, it isn’t. A case in point: This list of stories below. In the end, we couldn’t winnow it to ten and were forced to sneak in four more.


1. Norwich Cyber Majors Help Safeguard Super Bowl 50

After a year of preparation, Norwich CSIA majors and faculty based in California and Northfield, Vt., worked with Santa Clara city, California state, and federal law enforcement officials to analyze and flag potential cybersecurity threats during the NFL championship matchup between the Denver Broncos and Carolina Panthers.

2. Norwich University Celebrates 100 Years of ROTC
The birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, Norwich University celebrated ROTC’s centennial anniversary with a leadership symposium in April that drew scores of military VIPs. Among them, 39th U.S. Army Chief of Staff General Mark A. Milley, who gave the keynote address.

3. Norwich Class of 2020 Largest in University History
This fall, Norwich welcomed close to 900 first-year students to campus, the largest incoming class in the university’s nearly 200-year history.

4. Forbes Awards Norwich an “A” for Financial Strength
In August, Forbes magazine published their analysis of the financial footing of roughly 900 private colleges and universities, ranking Norwich University in the top 20 percent.

5. Writing Prof. Sean Prentiss Wins National Outdoor Book Award
Winning the history/biography category, Finding Abbey chronicled Prentiss’s two-year search for the hidden desert grave of environmental writer Edward Abbey.

6. Student-Built Tiny House Showcases Innovation, Hands-On Service Learning
Norwich architecture, construction management, and engineering majors and faculty designed and built C.A.S.A. (Creating Affordable Sustainable Architecture), a 334-square-foot tiny house with a small price tag to address Vermont’s affordable-housing crisis. See related article and video.

7. Norwich’s Standout Athletic Teams and Coaches Fight to a Four-Way Tie

8. Nisid Hajari Wins NU’s 2016 William E. Colby Book Award
A journalist who oversees Asia coverage for the editorial page of Bloomberg News, the first-time author won for Midnight’s Furies, an account of the 1947 partition of India and its surrounding violence following the end of British colonial rule. Founded at Norwich University, the annual book award and symposium celebrates outstanding writers, authors, and ideas from the fields of military affairs, military history, intelligence, and international affairs.

9. NUARI Cyber Attack Simulation Software Nominated for “Innovation of the Year”
Developed by the Norwich University Applied Research Institutes, the DECIDE-FS cyber-gaming platform has been used by major U.S. financial industry firms, regulators and law enforcement agencies to test institutional preparedness and resiliency in the face of cyberattacks.

10. Norwich Wins $700K+ NSA Grant to Train Next-Generation Cyber Soldiers
Working in collaboration with the United States Army Reserve, the National Security Agency announced in December that it had awarded Norwich over $700,000 to support scholarships for soldiers.

Bonus: Washington Post Columnist Says NU’s “I Will Try” Is Best College Motto
Writing in her Answer Sheet blog for the Washington Post, education reporter Valerie Strauss opines on “The Small Vermont University With Arguably the Best School Motto.”

What I Do: NASA Manager Dennis Davidson ’82

Photo: Formal head and shoulders studio portrait of Norwich alum and NASA manager Dennis Davidson
WHAT I DO:

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Dennis Davidson ’82
Manager, Program Control and Integration Office

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NASA Commercial Crew Program
Johnson Space Center

Mention NASA and most people think of astronauts and engineers. But any space program “starts with the budget,” says Norwich alum Dennis Davidson. “Without money, nothing’s gonna happen.” During the Shuttle era, Davidson was the no. 2 in charge of business operations for the $4 billion-a-year program. Today he manages 35 staffers and an annual budget of $1.2 billion for NASA’s crewed space flight program. The program’s main thrust is vehicle development contracts with commercial aerospace companies Space X and Boeing to send astronauts to the International Space Station and on other low-Earth orbit missions. He started his de facto NASA career shortly after his NU graduation, working for five years at Johnson Space Center while wearing an Air Force uniform. Thirty years on, he helps navigate Congress’s stopgap continuing budget resolutions to keep agency missions aiming for the heavens.

What’s your job at NASA?
In government lingo, program control is all the business functions. It’s procurement and contracting. It’s the finances. It’s IT. It’s security. Public relations. Legislative affairs. Interfacing with the center legal offices. We have a lot of oversight committees, seven or eight, including an aerospace safety advisory panel. It’s also about keeping the money flowing from fiscal year to fiscal year, so that the astronauts and engineers can go do their jobs and the contracts can perform.

Are you the top guy?
I am.

What’s it like to work at NASA? Any highlights?
There was a point in my career where I had an office in the same building as Mission Control. So being there every day, walking past Mission Control Center, being aware of that history. “Houston, we’ve got a problem” from Apollo 13. Or “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” That all those words came to Houston first. Being a part of that going forward was just huge.

The second piece is just the quality of the workforce down here. I mean you come in every day and work with just awesome people, who are fun to be around, smart, [and] solving hard, hard problems every day. Being in a position to participate and at times just observe and see that take place has just been fascinating.

I’ve moved around to several different jobs. But I was in the Shuttle Program for the last few years that we were flying. Being a part of those last few missions, when you knew STS-133, STS-134, STS-135 were almost at the end. We finished assembling the Space Station. We were not going to fly these vehicles anymore. These were the last flights. Just knowing the importance of what was going on at that point in time and being a part of it.

What do you see when you look at the space exploration landscape today?
NASA on the whole is still doing in-house development for deep space exploration. Whether it’s the robotic spacecraft that are currently operating on Mars or the Orion crewed vehicle that’s being developed here that will be capable of going to the moon or to Mars. There’s also a new NASA rocket, called the SLS, the space launch system, that’s going to take the Orion into space.

What we’re starting to do commercially is operating in what we refer to as low-Earth orbit, so up to 250 to 300 miles. Primarily that’s the International Space Station. We’ve got three vehicles that they’re working on for cargo. Two of them are operational already. Then we’re working on the two vehicles with Boeing and Space X for crewed transportation, getting us away from reliance on the Russians. The big focus outside of NASA, a lot of it is what they call the tourist industry. Those folks would take passengers up to space, but not for long.

What’s driving advances in your field and what are the big hurdles?
The big hurdle is the cost of getting things launched. A couple of companies are working on reusable launch vehicles. It’s the single use vehicle—you got to build a new one every time—that drives the cost. With Shuttle, it was a multiuse vehicle. But because of the nature of it’s design, it was almost as expensive. So finding a reusable way [to launch]. Both Blue Origin and Space X have working concepts to land their first stage rocket. They do the launch. They bring it back. They can actually fly it back and land it on landing legs, where you then refuel it and use it again. That will be the biggest single thing that will open up the market.

Why does exploring space matter?
The simple answer is, what if Columbus never had a desire to set sail for India? What if Lewis and Clark had never set out to see all the country of the Louisiana Purchase? What if those people had never done that? What would we have missed out on? We’re taking the human race into that next unknown. Will we ever colonize another planet? Maybe. [We’re taking] that next step. Asking, is it possible? Could we colonize another body—the moon, Mars, or anywhere else—if we needed to?

Dennis Davidson serves on the Board of Fellows advisory panel for the Norwich University College of Science and Mathematics.

Norwich University Office of Communications

September 14, 2016

Norwich welcomes author, former CEO and entrepreneur Marilyn Tam for fall Todd Lecture

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Sept. 13, 2016

Norwich University continues its Todd Lecture Series with “The Happiness Choice: 5 Decisions that Take You From Where You Are to Where You Want to Be,’’ a presentation by author, entrepreneur  and renowned leadership speaker Marilyn Tam, PhD, on Monday Nov. 7, 2016, at 7 p.m. in Plumley Armory.

This event is free and open to the public and is the first Todd Lecture in Norwich University’s “Year of Leadership” of the bicentennial countdown.

The former CEO of Aveda Corp., president of Reebok Apparel and Retail Group and vice president of Nike Inc., Tam is a speaker, author, consultant, board-certified executive coach, CEO of Marilyn Tam & Co. and founder and executive director of Us Foundation.

Tam is also a successful entrepreneur. Inc Magazine ranks her as one of the top 100 leadership speakers in the world. Brand Channel lists Tam as one of the four most prominent names in ethical business globally.

Tam is a contributing writer to the Huffington Post on how to live a happy, healthy, successful, and dynamically balanced life. She has had an extraordinarily diverse life, from her beginnings in a traditional Chinese family in Hong Kong to her meteoric rise through the executive ranks of the international business world to become an influential corporate leader, speaker, author, corporate consultant, leadership coach, and respected humanitarian.

Tam has developed and built four companies in fields as diverse as a corporate consulting and training company; a web portal company; a supply chain software company; and an integrated health and wellness company. She regularly speaks and consults with Fortune 500 companies, governments and non-profit organizations on leadership, life balance, gender and diversity, change management, and how to integrate social and environmental concerns into businesses profitably.

She is co-founder and executive director of the Us Foundation, whose mission is to facilitate global action plans and dialogue to address social, economic and environmental issues. Us Foundation is one of the partners for United Nations Habitat-II, and was nominated as a candidate for the “Best Practice Award” from the United Nations’ Habitat-II.

Tam served as two-term director on the national board of SCORE Association, a resource partner of the U.S. Small Business Administration, and has served on the international board of the Reebok Human Rights Awards. She was also a recipient of the Reebok Human Rights Award for her humanitarian work.

Tam is committed to the belief that philanthropy is integral to and provides an essential balance and relevance to her work, whether by directly improving the lot of workers in her contract factories around the world, or developing and conducting seminars to train other entrepreneurs in business leadership programs internationally.

Tam has served as an advisor to the country of Bhutan, working with its ministers and government officials to transition the country into the 21st Century while retaining their cultural and environmental heritage.

Tam was recognized as one of the Top 30 Female Entrepreneurs in the USA by Fempreneur Magazine. She was honored with the Artemis Award for her business and humanitarian work by the Greek government and the Euro American Women’s Council in Athens, Greece, with her likeness on a Greek postage stamp. eWomenNetwork presented her with their Lifetime Achievement Award. Tam is a lifetime member of Who’s Who World Wide and is listed in Who’s Who in American Women.

Tam’s book, “The Happiness Choice”, was the top three most-read books by businesses according to 800 CEO Read. The book won the Silver Medal of the Global eBook Awards. The book shows how and why happiness is crucial for business productivity and success, and for your physical, emotional, spiritual and financial health.

Her book, “How to Use What You’ve Got to Get What You Want”, is available globally in six languages. And, “Living the Life of Your Dreams” was eBook of the Year in the Inspirational category.

Tam was honored with a Ph.D. in Humane Letters by Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA.

Norwich University’s Todd Lecture Series is named in honor of retired U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Russell Todd and his late wife, Carol, in gratitude for their dedicated service to the university. Todd ’50, serves as Norwich President Emeritus. With this series, Norwich brings the nation’s foremost thought leaders drawn from business, politics, the arts, science, the military and other arenas to its Northfield campus. All lectures are streamed live and are free and open to the public.

For more information please visit the Todd Lecture Series website or call (802) 485-2633.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich University Announces Dana Professor, Faculty Awards

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

May 19, 2016

Recognizing outstanding scholarship and teaching, Norwich University faculty have named Mathematics Professor Daniel McQuillan a Charles A. Dana Professor. The prestigious award carries a $10,000 annual stipend.

McQuillan (pictured above) has taught 17 different mathematics courses since arriving at Norwich University in 2002, teaching most often: Discrete Mathematics; Calculus; Mathematics: A Liberal Art; and the Mathematics capstone (senior seminar) course.

In addition to the teaching of standard courses, McQuillan’s work has included summer research mentoring, leading to the publication of four professional peer-reviewed papers with Norwich University student coauthors. He also organizes Norwich’s involvement in the Putnam Mathematics competition, which can involve weekly meetings with interested students in which connections between different areas of mathematics are explored by solving unusual problems.

“A Charles A. Dana Professorship is a tremendous honor and an even greater responsibility,” McQuillan said. “I will take it as an enormous, daily challenge to live up to the expectations that we should all have of Dana Professors—I will try! I am extremely grateful to Norwich University—and in particular to my wonderful colleagues—for providing an environment where it is possible to do great things.

“Our best work is still ahead of us.”

A committee of current Norwich University Dana professors selected McQuillan for the award, which was announced during Commencement ceremonies on May 14.

The university’s Dana program works to recruit and retain an outstanding full-time faculty recognized for their scholarship and teaching excellence. Tenured full professors from all academic disciplines are eligible.

In 1974, the Charles A. Dana Foundation, a philanthropic foundation that funds research nationwide, presented Norwich University with an endowment designed to supplement salaries of full-time senior faculty members. Since the first nominations in 1975, Norwich has named 23 Charles A. Dana Professors.

Board of Fellows Faculty Development Prize

The Norwich University Faculty Development Committee announced today that Joe Latulippe, Associate Professor, Dept. of Mathematics, will receive this year’s $8,000 stipend for the Board of Fellows (BOF) Faculty Development Prize for “Modeling the Effects of Synaptic Plasticity on the Firing Patterns of Neurons.”

The BOF Faculty Development Prize is funded annually by the BOF in its role of stimulating and rewarding the University Faculty for creative and pragmatic research efforts.

Other Faculty Awards

Norwich University officials announced the recipients of Independent Study Leave (ISL) awards; Charles A. Dana Research Fellowships; Curriculum Development Fellowships; and Charles A. Dana Category I Grants for the 2016-17 academic year.

Independent Study Leave

  • Brett Cox, Professor, Dept. of English and Communications, to work on several pieces of short fiction.
  • Eleanor D’Aponte, Assistant Professor, School of Architecture + Art, for “The Tapestry of Concrete: Design Research and Casting of Prototypical Concrete Wall Panels Using Fabric-Formwork.”
  • Lauren Howard, Professor, Dept. of Biology and Physical Education, for “Howard’s Handbook: A Guide to Native, Naturalized and Commonly Cultivated Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines in the Northeast.”
  • Carl Martin, Associate Professor, Dept. of English and Communications, for “Domesticating Henry V: Hoccleve’s ‘To Henry V and the Company of the Garter.’”
  • Penny Shtull, Professor, School of Justice Studies and Sociology, for “Stalking on Campus: Awareness for College Mental Health Counselors.”

Charles A. Dana Research Fellowships

 Megan Doczi, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Biology and Physical Education, for “Localization of the Insulin-sensitive Kv1.3 Ion Channel During Brain Development.”

  • Elizabeth Gurian, Assistant Professor, School of Justice Studies and Sociology, for “Reframing Mass Murder Within Empirical Research.”
  • Yangmo Ku, Assistant Professor, Dept. of History and Political Science, for “The Politics of Economic Reform in Communist States: North Korea, Cuba, and Vietnam in Comparative Perspective.”
  • Tim Parker, Assistant Professor, School of Architecture + Art, for “Art and Architecture of Religious Pluralism: Historiography and Theoretical Framework.”
  • Tolya Stonorov, Assistant Professor, School of Architecture and Art, for The Design-Build Studio: Crafting Meaningful Work in Architecture Education.
  • Moses Tefe, Assistant Professor, David Crawford School of Engineering, for “A Strategy for Identifying High Pedestrian Crash Zones in Accra-Ghana.”

Curriculum Development Fellowships 

  • Gina Sherriff, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Modern Languages, for “Language Leadership Modules for the Spanish Program.”
  • Darlene Olsen, Associate Professor, Dept. of Mathematics, for “A Case Study Approach to Teaching Statistics to Health Science Majors.”

Charles A. Dana Category I Grants 

  • Natalia Blank, Associate Professor, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Danner Friend, Associate Professor, David Crawford School of Engineering
  • Emily Gray, Associate Professor, Dept. of History and Political Science
  • Llynne Kiernan, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing
  • Rob Knapik, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Physics
  • Yangmo Ku, Assistant Professor, Dept. of History and Political Science
  • Emily Meyer, Assistant Professor, School of Justice Studies and Sociology
  • Judith Stallings-Ward, Associate Professor, Dept. of Modern Languages

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Ideas @ Work: #32 Sparkling Tree Water

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

On Arbor Day last year, Asarasi CEO and NU alum Adam Lazar M’06 debuted Sparkling Tree Water, his first in a line of planned beverages produced from maple trees. The lightly carbonated, filtered water represents a tiny portion of the estimated 500 million gallons of water that is a by-product of New England and Canada’s maple sugaring industry. In an interview with Innovation Destination: Hartford, Lazar described his start-up as an impact-focused business. “We are impacting water conservation [and] creating value-added products to the maple farming communities of North America.”

More Ideas@Work:

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Ideas @ Work: #31 A Glove That Helps Teach Sign Language

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Overlapping worlds often spark innovation. While watching a sign-language interpreter at a LEGO robotics tournament, engineering major Maggie Cross ’16 came up with the idea to develop a glove that could help teach sign language. Her prototype haptic device uses embedded sensors and buzzers to cue wearers when they make mistakes, an approach known to speed learning.

Read more about Maggie Cross’s research project >>

More Ideas@Work:

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Ideas @ Work: #26-28 School of Architecture + Art

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Listing all the innovative projects spilling out of Chaplin Hall would easily fill the rest of this magazine. So let’s settle for a few highlights:

26. Professor Eleanor D’Aponte continues to explore fabric-formed concrete. “The value of her work as part of the research contingent of a vanguard movement … cannot be underestimated,” says colleague Cara Armstrong. “It is radical research propositions such as hers that change how we build.”

27. Meanwhile, architecture professor Matt Lutz and instructor Stephen Kredell worked with sophomores last fall to conceive how repurposed Conex shipping containers could be used to build classrooms, health clinics, and community centers in Afghanistan.

28. And at a kickoff event last fall, senior architecture students led by architecture professor Michael Hoffman took design inspiration from Palette2030.org. The nascent architectural movement and design’s credo calls for zeroing out the carbon footprint of the built environment in the next several decades.

More Ideas@Work:

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Ideas @ Work: #22 Todd Lectures

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Since its founding in 2008 by Ellen and John Drew, the Todd Lecture Series has brought national leaders and provocative thinkers to campus for insightful talks on key topics. Past speakers represent a who’s who of military leaders, diplomats, astronauts, architects, engineers, scientists, and authors. Luminaries include General Barry McCaffrey, USA (Ret.), genome pioneer Craig Venter, Segway inventor Dean Kamen, author and environmentalist Bill McKibben, and former U.S. Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice, Colin Powell, and Madeleine Albright. Learn more at tls.norwich.edu.

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