Ideas @ Work: #5 Forging the Future

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Formally launched during Homecoming in 2014, the Forging the Future campaign aims to raise $100 million by the time Norwich celebrates its bicentennial in 2019. The university has already raised more than $71 million toward that goal. The funds will be used to position Norwich for its next century of service to students and the nation. Projects include the construction of a new academic building named Mack Hall, the creation of new scholarships and IT infrastructure, and major renovations to Dewey, Webb, and Ainsworth, among others. The campaign’s transformative power can already be seen at Kreitzberg Library, where a $6.8 million renovation was completed last fall.

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Norwich University Celebrates $6.8M Kreitzberg Library Renovation

Upgrades include state-of-the-art technology and enhanced energy efficiency.
Norwich University Office of Communications

August 31, 2015

Norwich University representatives will gather with building contractors and partners to mark the official opening of the campus’s newly renovated Kreitzberg Library on Tuesday, Sept. 1. A ceremonial ribbon-cutting event will be held at 3:15 p.m. inside the library foyer to celebrate the occasion, followed by guided tours of the new facility.

The $6.8 million renovation is the first completed project under the Forging the Future campaign. Announced at Homecoming in 2014, the university’s largest comprehensive fundraising effort aims to raise $100 million in the five years leading up to the university’s bicentennial in 2019.

A state-of-the-art library when it was built 23 years ago, Kreitzberg Library serves as the main student and faculty library on the Norwich campus. The library is named for principal donors Barbara and Fred Kreitzberg ’57. The original library was completed in 1993 at a cost of $8.1 million.

Computer and information technology has radically changed modern university libraries in the years since, transforming libraries from cathedrals of the book to cathedrals of learning.

The new renovations place Kreitzberg Library at the forefront of the latter category.

“Barbara and I have loved this library since its dedication in 1992,” Fred Kreitzberg ’57 said. “We know that students have enjoyed using this library and hope that with the new renovations it will be even better-suited for our technologically advanced students.”

While celebrating at the Sept. 1 event, the Norwich community will tour the library’s major enhancements, including new workstations, group-study and collaborative-learning areas, new technology-enabled classrooms and a café.

Additional improvements include two new conference rooms, and a 77% increase in the number of seats, from 249 to 440. The new library also boasts a 10-fold increase in data speeds and capacity and state of the art collaborative tools, thanks in part to a $125,000 grant from the George I. Alden Trust to support technology upgrades.

Construction began Dec. 17, 2014, with approximately 40 Vermonters working on site on an average day. At times that figure climbed to 60. The construction was primarily completed by Vermont firms employing Vermont workers, including EF Wall, Bates & Murray Electrical, Vermont Mechanical and Red Thread.

Demonstrating Norwich’s commitment to sustainability, the vast majority of installed lighting use LED bulbs, subsidized by Efficiency Vermont, with an estimated energy efficiency of 80%-90%. In addition, air handling units were upgraded, low volatile organic compounds (VOC) paint was used, and virtually all construction debris was recycled.

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
(802) 485-2886; (m) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu
Follow us on Twitter @NorwichNews

Norwich Nets $125K Grant to Support Tech Upgrades During $6.5M Library Renovation

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University has received a $125,000 grant from the George I. Alden Trust to support technology upgrades during the renovation of Kreitzberg Library.

Ground was broken on the $6.5 million library renovation last December. The project will add new workstations, group-study and collaborative-learning areas, a café and social gathering place, and significant technology upgrades. Improvements include a ten-fold increase in data speeds and capacity and a digital media commons, all to engage active learning. Students will be able to gather to study, exchange ideas, and socialize in a state-of-the-art learning environment.

The renovations will also expand the Academic Achievement Center and increase space for university counseling services and are slated to be completed before the start of the fall 2015 semester.

Kreitzberg Library was constructed 22 years ago at a time when campus libraries were designed to be “cathedrals of the book.” In a sign of how rapidly the computer and information age has transformed higher education and society, campus libraries on the leading edge today are designed to be “cathedrals of learning.” The Kreitzberg Library renovation puts the Norwich campus library squarely in the latter category.

The Kreitzberg Library renovation is part of a broader campus transformation tied to Norwich’s $100M comprehensive campaign in the lead-up to the university’s bicentennial in 2019. Initiatives include a $24M new academic building and $28M in renovations to existing academic buildings.

About the George I. Alden Trust

George I. Alden established the George I. Alden Trust on August 24, 1912. The Trust was established for the general purpose of “the maintenance of some charitable or philanthropic enterprises” with particular expressed interest in “the promotion of education in schools, colleges, or other educational institutions.” The Trustees focus their grant making on capital needs and support institutions that demonstrate a combination of educational excellence, exciting programming, and efficient and effective administration.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
802.485.2886, (m) 595.3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich University Alumni Donate Vietnam Letters to Archives

Office of Communications | Norwich University

December 19, 2014

When American soldiers serving in Vietnam wrote letters home, they often included—on the backs of the Airmail envelopes—the number of days until homecoming. Now, the Vietnam letters of two members of the Class of 1966 are available in the Norwich University Archives, and thanks to these generous donations, researchers can see firsthand these details and others.

On Veterans Day, the family of the late Lt. Col. Howard C. Lewis ’66 donated two sets of letters that he, as a young captain, wrote home from in-country, 1969. It became the first collection of its kind at Norwich University. The donation includes letters Lewis penned to his twin brother Harold, who also attended Norwich, and parents Daniel and Dorothy Lewis. The collection also includes several photographs of Howard and the Lewis family (1964-1966) and material tied to the dedication of the Lt. Col. Howard C. Lewis Memorial Chapel at the Camp Ethan Allen Firing Range in Jericho, VT, in 1988.

During his Vietnam service, Lewis was cited seven times for bravery and was awarded the Soldier’s Medal, five Bronze Stars, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Air Medal, two Army Commendation medals and, later, the Vermont Medal of Merit. Following his return from Vietnam, he joined the Vermont National Guard, rising to the rank of Lt. Colonel. He lived in Barre with his family until his death from cancer in 1987—the result, his family believes, of his exposure to Agent Orange. More than 500 people attended his memorial. The Barre-Montpelier Times Argus called the service “one of the largest funerals ever held in the Granite City.” At the time of his death, he was survived by wife Sandra Roscoe Lewis, and two children.

The Lewis donation evolved from a collaboration between Lewis’s youngest brother, Donald Lewis ’72, and the Norwich Record—Norwich University’s alumni magazine. Don Lewis originally presented the letters for publication in the winter 2015 issue, dedicated to Norwich alumni who served in Vietnam.

Shortly thereafter, another member of the class of 1966, William F. Bonk, donated his collection of Vietnam letters. Bonk had also provided a collection of letters to the Record for publication, and afterwards, graciously offered them to the Archive for public access.

The collection consists of letters written by Bonk to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bonk of Connecticut, during his service as a helicopter pilot in Vietnam, February through October 1968. The collection also includes color slides documenting his time in Vietnam as well as a single slide probably taken during his NU commencement in 1966.

These gifts constitute the first two substantial manuscript collections from the Vietnam era to be available in the University Archives. They will serve as the foundation to helping students, faculty, staff, alumni, and researchers better understand the Norwich experience in Vietnam.

To access these collections, please contact the Norwich University Archives, Kreitzberg Library, (802) 485-2947 or archives@norwich.edu