Norwich University presents chief information officer for the Joint Chiefs of Staff in June Todd Lecture

Norwich University continues its 2015 Todd Lecture Series with “Leadership in the Digital Age” a presentation by Lieutenant General Mark S. Bowman, Director Command, Control, Communications and Computers (C4) / Cyber and the Chief Information Officer for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on Thursday June 18, 2015 at 10 a.m. in Plumley Armory.

At the Pentagon, Bowman develops C4 capabilities; conducts analysis and assessments; and evaluates C4 requirements, plans, programs and strategies.

Bowman photo
Lieutenant General Mark S. Bowman

Previously, he served as the Director of Architecture, Operations, Networks and Space, for the Office of the Army Chief Information Officer. Bowman played a central role in establishing strategy, policy, and guidance to integrate, build and facilitate the U.S. Army’s LandWarNet network.

Bowman was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army on May 28, 1978. He has served in several joint and operational assignments and has commanded at every level from company to Signal Brigade. He has a bachelor’s degree in history from Norwich University, Vt. and a master’s degree in public administration from Shippensburg University, Pa.

Bowman’s lecture serves as the keynote presentation for this year’s annual residency conference of nearly 600 students representing nine online graduate programs and two bachelor’s degree completion programs at Norwich’s College of Graduate and Continuing Studies. Gathering from across the country and the globe under the theme of “Learning to Lead, Leading to Serve,” these Norwich students will gather for a week of capstone/culminating academic work and conferences

Norwich University’s Todd Lecture Series is named in honor of Army Maj. Gen. Russell Todd (USA Ret.) and his wife, Carol, in gratitude for their dedicated service to the university. Todd ’50, serves as Norwich President Emeritus. With this series, Norwich brings the nation’s foremost thought leaders drawn from business, politics, the arts, science, the military and other arenas to its Northfield campus. All events are free and open to the public.

For more information please check the Todd Lecture Series website or call (802) 485-2633.

Transcript: Brig. Gen. Raymond Descheneaux’s 2015 Norwich Commissioning Address

On Sunday, May 10, 2015, Norwich University alum and United States Marine Corps Reserve Brigadier General Raymond R. Descheneaux ’87, the Corps’ Assistant Deputy Commandant for Aviation (Mobilization), addressed ROTC commissioning officers from the Class of 2015 at the formal Norwich commissioning ceremony. A copy of his prepared remarks follow.

Norwich: A Legacy of Leadership

 
Thank you, General Sullivan for that kind introduction. And thank you for all you continue to do on behalf of our University. From your earliest days as a cadet through your time as the 32nd Chief of Staff of the Army, through today, you continue to lead from the front. As Norwich’s most distinguished graduate in our school’s history, it is my honor to share this stage!

President Schneider and the Trustees of Norwich University, I want to personally thank you for this incredible opportunity to come home and be with my extended family. I cannot truly express my gratitude. It has been a pleasure getting to know each of you.

Today, Norwich is recognized globally because of your vision and guidance. In uniform our out of uniform, Norwich grads can be found making a positive difference in every corner of our planet and in every walk of life.

To MG Todd and all the distinguished guests I share this stage with; you have lived your life by example and we continue to look to you for guidance, you are a beacon of inspiration to us all.

To the Faculty and Staff, I thank you for your pushing these officers out of their comfort zone and expanding their view of the world. Because of you, their pedigree is unmatched.

To our military team of instructors, you are the ones who introduce reality to theory. You are where the rubber meets the road. You know what these officers will soon be confronting and have shaped their training accordingly. Thank you.

Before I continue, I would like to take a moment to wish all of the mothers in this gathering a Happy Mothers Day!

To the parents, family and friends who helped make this day possible, without your commitment, love, and sacrifice none of this could have ever happened.

Now, to the commissionees. I talk with you today as a brother in arms, a fellow graduate and a friend. From all of us here today, congratulations for making it through the crucible we call Norwich. As we all know, the hard part is not getting into Norwich, it is graduating from it.

The day you have been waiting for is finally here. By now, your car is, or should be, mostly packed with old uniforms, new uniforms and four years of who knows what. Mentally, there is Still a whirlwind-list of things you need to wrap up. Meanwhile, you have company in town! Then, of course, is the much anticipated, final drive down 89 South.

Well, for the next few minutes, I invite all of you to stop, catch your breath, and immerse yourself in the sights, sounds, and the atmosphere of this special event. This ceremony is an amazing moment-in-time…and it is ours to enjoy.

Today will mark the first day of your life as a commissioned officer. Before you take your Oath of Office, I would like to offer a few thoughts. As you know, what comes with this Oath is a great responsibility and an incredible challenge. As of today’s commissioning, you have one objective in life; to support and defend the Constitution of the United States.

For the United States military, this is a very complex and varied order that spans the globe. However, it truly boils down to one fundamental purpose: To fight and win our nation’s battles. Period!

You have made the conscious decision to take a path less traveled; one of military service as an officer in the United States Army, Navy, Air Force or Marine Corps.

Very soon, you can expect a high octane, rocket ship ride into the stratosphere, so tighten your chinstraps and lean forward. There may be no guardrails where you travel.

For our new officers, you have prepared your adult life for this challenge. You intuitively understand that military service is a calling and not just a job. In this world, if you are not thoroughly prepared, others depending on you may pay a painful price for your shortcomings.

I don’t have to tell this crowd, the threats are real. Many of you will be forward deployed faster than you realize. As we enjoy this morning, the reality is, our nation is locked in a clash of human wills, a war of ideas.

Right now, our enemies are actively preparing for or engaged in combat with our fellow countrymen. The enemy plays by their own rules; and for them, there are no rules.

Radical extremists, near-peer competitors, state and non-state actors top the charts of emerging or maturing threats in 2015. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, cyber-warfare, and piracy remain in the headlines. Then of course there are the natural disasters like tsunamis, earthquakes, and now Ebla outbreaks. Sprinkle in regional instability or contested space and there is your powder keg. This is the world you are inheriting, the domain you must master.

However, threats to our liberties and our Republic are nothing new. There will always be new bad guys, new technologies, and new realms of instability to overcome. After 196 years, Norwich has gotten pretty good at producing warrior-statesmen that can confront and eliminate the next new threat.

Norwich men and women with backs of steel have answered our nation’s call and have moved to the sound of gunfire since our first graduating class. This is who we are, and this class is no different. The commissioning Class of 2015 already knows this.

Based on my calculations, when the Twin Towers fell, you were in grade school. Armed conflict and the defense of all-we-hold-dear is all that you know. It seems your path to this commissioning is only natural.

You also know the price for eternal vigilance. You know the recent names, faces, and personalities of those colleagues who have made the ultimate sacrifice on our behalf. They and all of our brothers and sisters who have made this sacrifice will always be remembered. Today, we stand united as a testament to their service!

You have entered this calling with eyes wide open. You represent the next “greatest generation” of Americans and I’m proud to stand amongst your ranks.

Remember, coming from Norwich, you are well suited to operate in the modern battle space; a diverse battle space that blends combined and coalition partners, joint forces, inter-agency and non-government entities.

You will soon find yourself operating in a volatile, uncertain, and complex environment. And yes, there will be competing interests. To succeed, you will have to learn to thrive in this chaos; and master this domain!

To assist you I offer a few brief thoughts. Remember who you are and where you come from. Your family and Norwich have prepared you well for this journey.

Trust your instincts.

Reinforce your character and integrity at every turn. Never, ever compromise your standards.

Constantly seek self-improvement and master your profession with a vengeance.

Never underestimate your enemy or overestimate your capabilities.

Starting now, you must develop an intense if not insane work ethic. Sound extreme? Perhaps, but consider this, our enemies do not rest. They are preparing for you at this very moment. They are focused, driven, and unrelenting. They are resourceful. They have already been in the fight.

Some say you should “work smarter, not harder.” I say, in the world you will be operating, if you are not working both smarter and harder, you are already falling behind the power curve. For them to succeed, they must remain one step ahead of us. They trust you will be lazy, pre-occupied, and ineffective. You will prove them wrong.

You must master your profession so that you can get out in front of their thought process. The best hockey players don’t skate to where the puck is but where it is going. Anticipate failure and wrong turns when operating outside of your comfort zone. Correct your shortfalls, and never, ever give up. This is the difference between victory and defeat.

This is the new world you will be operating in! Remember this, as an officer it will never, ever be about you. It will be about the men, women, and the families in your care. Challenge, mentor and guide them to improve their physical, mental, and moral capabilities.

You will soon be handed the keys to America’s most precious natural resource, the American warfighter. Like those of yesteryear, this post 9-11 warfighter is amazing. Like you, they run like stallions, have the tenacity of a pit-bull, the cunning of a fox, and an insatiable hunger for information. They serve by choice and possess an unlimited fountain of ambition.

You will learn from them and they will learn from you. As a commissioned officer you have the additional obligation to develop and care for them. As a parent to a child, you must mentor, inspire, and always lead by example. You must also have compassion and understanding; a firm and guiding hand. They will emulate you. You are grooming our next generation of leaders.

Success is not based on machines or technology, but rather human nature and the will to succeed. This is has always been the intangible yet critical element of warfare; inspiring an individual’s will to overcome adversity. This is why the United States military is so successful in the art of “centralized command and decentralized control.”

We groom and trust our subordinates. Properly led, the American service member will deliver incredible results with their heart and soul. No threat on Earth can stop them!

And now, the torch is being passed and it is up to you. The future is yours; you will seize the moment. Like the Norwich men and women before you, there is no doubt you will blaze your own noteworthy trail in our Nation’s history!

We again want you to know how proud we are of your achievements. We know this world will be a safer place because of you. On behalf of your entire Norwich family, we wish you god-speed, fair winds and following seas as you become an officer in the United States military.

Thank you. Norwich Forever!

Former U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Dole to Speak at 2015 Norwich Commencement

Tracing a career in public service from the White House to the American Red Cross and beyond, Dole speaks to Norwich University’s “Year of Service” 2019 Bicentennial countdown theme
Updated May 6, 2015

 
NORTHFIELD, Vt.–Norwich University is honored to announce that former U.S. Senator Elizabeth Dole will deliver its 2015 commencement address to graduating seniors on Saturday, May 9.

Sen. Dole will receive an honorary degree from Norwich University.

A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Duke University, Elizabeth Dole earned both a law degree and a master of arts in teaching from Harvard University. She later served in the Nixon White House as Deputy to the Special Assistant for Consumer Affairs, an appointment that sparked a career-long interest in public safety and humanitarian work. President Nixon also appointed her to the Federal Trade Commission, where she served as a commissioner for five years.

Dole later served in the Reagan Administration in a variety of posts, including U.S. Secretary of Transportation—the first female to hold the position. She worked on legislation to raise the drinking age to 21 and issued landmark regulation which is credited with the widespread enactment of the first state safety belt laws and air bags in cars. These three actions have saved nearly 400,000 lives to date.

For those efforts, Dole received both the Humanitarian Award from the National Commission Against Drunk Driving and the Lifetime Achievement Award from Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety.

She is perhaps best known as the former president of the American Red Cross and for her own political career as U.S. senator representing her home state of North Carolina. Dole is also the wife of former senator and World War II veteran, Bob Dole.

In 2012, Dole founded the Caring for Military Families: The Elizabeth Dole Foundation, to raise awareness and support for the spouses, mothers, fathers, and other loved ones caring for wounded, ill and injured military personnel. In 2014, she launched a national coalition of public, private, nonprofit, labor and faith leaders to fill the gaps in support provided to these hidden heroes.

Norwich University officials say Dole was the natural choice for its 2015 commencement address given her lifetime of public service. This year, Norwich is celebrating the 2014-15 academic year as the “Year of Service,” the first year in a five-year countdown to the university’s bicentennial celebration in 2019.

During commencement ceremonies starting at 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 9, 2015, Dole will address approximately 400 students matriculating from 32 undergraduate programs and one master’s program. The ceremony, which is free and open to the public, will be held in Shapiro Field House.

During the commencement ceremony, Dole will receive an honorary Norwich degree.

View the schedule to learn more, including how to access the live stream of the ceremony.

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu    

Norwich University Names Top Corps Leader for Upcoming Academic Year

Norwich University Office of Communications

April 28, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University President Richard Schneider and Commandant of Cadets Col. Russell Holden are pleased to announce that Alex Breindel, of Goldsboro, N.C., has been selected to serve as the 2015-16 Regimental Commander, the highest-ranking cadet of Norwich University’s Corps of Cadets (NUCC).

Breindel, (pictured here with GEN Gordon R. Sullivan, USA (Ret.) ’59, chairman of the Norwich University Board of Trustees) is a 2012 graduate of Wayne Early Middle College High School. At Norwich, he is a Mathematics major, a perennial Dean’s List student and contracted to earn a commission in the U.S. Air Force following graduation next May. He is also the cadet senior enlisted advisor in 3rd Battalion.

Among other activities, Breindel is involved in the Class of 2016 Junior Ring Committee, Maroon and Gold Key Club and the Center for Civic Engagement.

“Alex has excelled at every level during his first three years in the Norwich University Corps of Cadets,” said President Richard W. Schneider. “He is an exceptional leader, critical thinker and problem solver.  Alex is the perfect choice to command the Corps of Cadets next year.”

Breindel will be formally promoted, along with next year’s cadet officers and NCOs during a Corps of Cadets Review with Change of Command Ceremony on Tuesday, April 28, 2015, at 1 p.m. on the Upper Parade Ground.

“I am very humbled to be appointed the next Cadet Colonel,” Breindel said. “I have come a long way through many challenges and have met a lot of great people along the way. With every passing day there is not a decision I make I would not be comfortable telling my mom. As I take command of the regiment it will be the people in my life that I thank and remember.”

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Norwich University
802.485.2886, (m) 595.3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

NASA Astronaut to Speak During Norwich’s Spring Todd Lecture Series

Space Shuttle and International Space Station veteran Michael E. Fossum will speak about his 193 days in space and NASA research
January 27, 2014

 

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University continues its spring Todd Lecture Series with a lecture titled, “Report from the International Space Station,’’ a presentation by a decorated NASA Astronaut Michael E. Fossum on Thursday February 26, 2015 at 7 p.m. in Dole Auditorium, Webb Hall.

A veteran of three space flights, Fossum has logged seven space walks and over 193 days in space aboard the Space Shuttle and International Space Station.

Fossum will discuss his work aboard the orbiting national laboratory during his lecture, which is sponsored by Norwich University’s College of Science and Mathematics. A Q&A will follow the presentation.

Fossum received his commission in the U.S. Air Force at Texas A&M University in 1980. He completed graduate work at the Air Force Institute of Technology the following year before the Air Force assigned him to support NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. In 1985, he graduated from test pilot school at Edwards Air Force Base, California, and served as a Flight Test Engineer in the F-16 Test Squadron. Fossum resigned from active duty in 1992 to work for NASA and retired as a Colonel from the USAF Reserves in 2010. He has logged more than 1,800 hours in 35 different aircraft.

In 1993, he joined NASA as a systems engineer with primary responsibilities to evaluate the Russian Soyuz spacecraft for use as a space station emergency escape vehicle. Later in 1993, Fossum was selected to represent NASA’s Flight Crew Operations Directorate in an extensive redesign of the International Space Station (ISS).

He was selected by NASA as an astronaut candidate in 1998. After eight years of intensive training, he made his first space flight, traveling aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on a 13-day mission in July 2006 to supply the International Space Station. During that mission, Fossum made three space walks, called extravehicular activities (EVAs).

Fossum flew aboard Discovery again in 2008 with the STS-124 crew that delivered Japan’s Kibo lab module to the ISS. He returned to space in 2011 as part of Expedition 28 and served as commander of the ISS. His final EVA during this mission was the seventh in his career for a total of 48 hours, 32 minutes of EVA time, placing him seventh on the all-time list for cumulative EVA time.

Norwich University’s Todd Lecture Series is named in honor of Army Maj. Gen. Russell Todd (USA Ret.) and his wife, Carol, in gratitude for their dedicated service to the university. Todd ’50, serves as Norwich President Emeritus. With this series, Norwich brings the nation’s foremost thought leaders drawn from business, politics, the arts, science, the military and other arenas to its Northfield campus. All events are free and open to the public.

For more information please check the Todd Lecture Series website or call (802) 485-2633.

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu    

A Lifetime of Mentoring From Colin Powel Comes Full Circle

School of Nursing Director Sharon Richie, PhD, describes her long-running professional relationship with retired four-star Army general Colin Powell
By Sharon Richie, PhD | School of Nursing Director
College of Professional Schools

December 18, 2014

I first met Gen. Colin Powell in1980 when he was a major general and I a newly minted Army Nurse Corps major. I was at my first “ROCKS” meeting in Washington, DC, a support organization for field grade officers “of color” that had about 200 male members. At the time, I was the third woman selected to the group. At a reception following the meeting, Gen. Powell introduced himself, saying that I now had 200 brothers to look after me during my career and to call upon him at any time. Later, at our monthly meetings, he always checked on how I was doing, asking “So what is your next step?”

[pullquote cite=”Sharon Richie, PhD” type=”right”]The lessons learned from my general stood the test of time and were still being passed on to our next generation of leaders. I thank Gen. Powel today as much as I did in 1980.[/pullquote]

Over the years, Gen. Powell kept asking the same question and was thrilled when I decided to apply for the White House Fellows (WHF) program in1982. The non-partisan program is open to all, regardless of party affiliation. Gen. Powell had been a White House Fellow himself in1972 and valued his time and experience. Years after that assignment, Gen. Powell served as chief of staff for Secretary of Defense Casper Weinberger. When my WHF class visited that office, my “ROCKS” brother—Gen. Powell—gave me an encouraging wink, which spoke volumes: I was not alone. We also saw each other every year at the “ROCKS” scholarship ball at Andrews Air Force base. I still treasure the photo taken in1989 of him, myself and my former husband Paul Patrick Henri.

Leadership Lessons

In 2009 I was honored to be included in Charles Garcia’s book Leadership Lessons of the White House Fellows (WHF). Garcia had interviewed over 220 WHF’s, and I was quoted along side Gen. Powell in Chapter 6, which was entitled, “Leaders have a Laser-Like Focus on their People”. Gen. Powell’s section included a story that exemplified “the sort of transformative impact that leadership can have.” My section gave examples of how I used those lessons as the chief nurse of various Army Medical Centers. The irony is that I learned my leadership lessons from my WHF mentor and from a general who kept up with a junior officer her entire career and beyond. I also was fortunate to be able to see Gen. Powell at the annual WHF seminars, which updated all WHF’s on the current administration’s work.

When selected for promotion to colonel, I asked then US Secretary of State Powell to do the honors. He said yes immediately but stipulated that the ceremony had to be held in Washington, given his schedule. I explained that I was funding all of my brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles and cousins to attend the ceremony and that I could not afford to house them in DC. At the time, I was a student at the Army War College in Carlise Barracks, Penn., where I could afford to rent out a local motel for all my relatives. Given that this might be my last promotion, Secretary Powell suggested a mutual friend, a general officer who would thoughtfully review my entire career for my family at the ceremony. I thought, how sensitive of him to suggest this, and he was right. My family finally found out what I had been doing all of those years on active duty.

After 26 years of active duty, I served three years in the United Arab Emirates helping to upgrade their military healthcare system. Upon my return, I interviewed active duty Army nurses, who had deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Those interviews later turned into a book entitled Angel Walk: Nurses at War in Iraq and Afghanistan. My dream was to have the book endorsed by Gen. Powell. Instead, he called me to say what a fine book it was, but he was prohibited from endorsing any books because of the avalanche of requests it generated in his office. I shared that his “stated” endorsement, written or not, meant the world to me. Still his question was the same, “What will you do next?” I answered that I did not know, but he would be the first to know it when it came to me.

Norwich Nursing

My unexpected invitation to apply for the position as the Director of the School of Nursing at Norwich University was a long-shot given the weather (I was in Florida at the time) and my prejudices about academia. However, once I visited the campus, met the students, faculty members and senior administrators, I fell in love. It was a dream job to be able to be with my soldiers and nurses again. I held my breath waiting for the decision, and once it came, my first action was to text my general. He answered immediately, congratulating me and saying that clearly I had one more assignment before I really retired. “I am so very proud of you,” he wrote.

The past one-and-a-half years has been a whirlwind of getting oriented to my new job and getting my arms around my students and faculty members. It has been pure joy. I continuously share with others Mark Nepo’s quote, “Joy in what we do is not an added feature; it is a sign of deep health.” That quote sustains me now and led me to contact my general to ask him to share with our Norwich University community what service to others has meant to him as a leader. He did not disappoint.

[pullquote cite=”Sharon Richie, PhD” type=”right”]These words from one of my nursing students showed me that the lessons learned from my general stood the test of time and were still being passed on to our next generation of leaders.[/pullquote]

Amy Bidell is a senior nursing student here at Norwich and the president of the Student Nurses Association. A member of the Navy ROTC program, Amy was chosen to listen to two thought leaders, Gen. Sullivan and Gen. Powell, during the latter’s visit to campus in November 2014 in a private session with nine other cadets. Amy shared her thoughts with me about the session:

“General Powel and General Sullivan, both of whom sat at the table with us to speak, did not speak of current political or national security issues as I had imagined. Both gentlemen spoke primarily of family and the importance of having a solid support system at home throughout one’s career, whether it be a military career or not. General Powell told one story in particular in which he came home in his new uniform the day after receiving a new rank. The moment he proudly walked into the door with his new insignia, his daughter yelled to Mrs. Powell, “Mom, the GI Joe is home!”

“From both General Powell and General Sullivan I realized the importance of still having a ‘human’ element to one’s life, even if only behind closed doors. General Powell and General Sullivan are obviously both high-ranking prestigious military leaders. Yet based on their stories, it was apparent they both have an aspect of their lives that can be found in many American homes of any social class: a loving family with whom they have fun. This aspect of their life, while maybe small in comparison with the time-consuming nature of their careers, seemed to be the glue that held all other aspects of their life together and gave it meaning.”

These words from one of my nursing students showed me that the lessons learned from my general stood the test of time and were still being passed on to our next generation of leaders. I thank Gen. Powel today as much as I did in 1980. He is the epitome of leadership, service to country and balance with a strong family life.

Editor’s note: Visit the Todd Lecture Series website to watch Gen. Powell’s 2014 Veterans Day talk at Norwich University.

New Leadership Minor at School of Business and Management

The new minor helps students gain leadership know-how and experience through multidisciplinary academic exploration and discovery.
By Mike Kelley, PhD, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
School of Business & Management

 
October 22, 2014

The leadership minor offers students a means to expand their knowledge and experience in leadership via an informally guided, multidisciplinary journey of academic exploration and discovery. Newly offered this 2014-15 academic year, the minor builds on the premise that leadership development is a core mission of Norwich University. The leadership minor focuses on building an understanding of self and others as members of teams. Taken as a whole, the minor enhances development of knowledge and skills essential in the 21st century, particularly the role of the team member; teamwork; critical thinking; ethical decision-making; mental agility; oral and written communications; planning; self-awareness, including self-assessment, self-reflection and self-regulation; and reflection on ethical standards of conduct in the professional world.

Leadership Minor Facts:

  • The NU Leadership minor is open to students of all academic majors.
  • All minor courses must be completed with a grade of C or better to earn the minor.
  • It is most beneficial if the student selects the minor prior to the start of her or his junior year to allow maximum time for personal assessment, reflection, growth and development.
  • All students in the minor will have the opportunity for informal coaching and mentoring by a member of the multidisciplinary Leadership Minor Committee and will have the opportunity to attend and participate in optional leadership development activities.

Minor Requirements:

  • Two prescribed classes, Psychology of Leadership (PY210) and Organizational Behavior (MG351).
  • The NU ethics course required for your major.
  • Two elective courses from two disciplines outside your major. They may be chosen from a broad list that includes one junior year ROTC course.
  • An integrating experience course, such as a senior year ROTC course.

GEN Gordon R. Sullivan to Discuss Climate Change in Spring Todd Lecture

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University continues its Todd Lecture Series this spring with “National Security Implications of Climate Change,’’ a presentation by former Army Chief of Staff, General Gordon R. Sullivan on February 5, 2015, at 7 p.m. in Plumley Armory.

Sullivan served as the 32nd Army Chief of Staff under President Bill Clinton. In the post, the four star general helped reengineer and downsize the US Army in the wake of the Cold War, leading it into the Information Age while facing a 40 percent budget cut.

Sullivan is the president and chief executive officer of the Association of the United States Army, headquartered in Arlington, Va.

Sullivan received a bachelor of arts in political science from Norwich University and commissioned as a US Army second lieutenant of Armor in 1959. He served two tours in Vietnam and is the recipient of the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Legion of Merit and the Army Distinguished Service Medal. Sullivan retired from the Army in 1995 after more than 36 years of active service.

Sullivan currently serves as the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Norwich University and the Marshall Legacy Institute. He holds positions on the MITRE Army Advisory Board, the MIT Lincoln Labs Advisory Board, the CNA Military Advisory Board and as a Life Trustee of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.

During his Feb. 5 lecture, Sullivan will discuss two studies published in recent years that draw conclusions about the threat of climate change to national security including its role as a threat multiplier for instability in volatile parts of the world and its interrelationship with national security and energy dependence. This lecture is hosted by the College of National Services.

Norwich University’s Todd Lecture Series is named in honor of Army Maj. Gen. Russell Todd (USA Ret.) and his wife, Carol, in gratitude for their dedicated service to the university. Todd ’50, serves as Norwich President Emeritus. With this series, Norwich brings the nation’s foremost thought leaders from the worlds of business, politics, the arts, science, the military and other disciplines to campus. All events are free and open to the public.

For more information please check the Todd Lecture Series website or call (802) 485-2633.