Norwich University Regimental Band to perform in the 58th Presidential Inauguration

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Jan. 13, 2017

The Norwich University Regimental Band and Drill Team, will represent the state of Vermont and perform in the 58th Presidential Inauguration, to be held on Friday, Jan. 20, in Washington, D.C., for Donald J. Trump.

“The Norwich University Regimental Band and Drill Team is proud to represent the university and the state of Vermont,” Assistant Commandant and Director of Bands Todd P. Edwards said.

As the oldest collegiate band in the country, the Regimental Band carries on a long tradition of excellence musically, academically and militarily. Founded in 1820, the Band’s motto is “Semper Zoo.”

The Regimental Drill Team “Shock Platoon” was formed in 1937. The talent of Drill Team is considered a showpiece of the university. The team is a perennial powerhouse in U.S. college and university drill competitions, with a motto of: “Fierce Pride.”

Music at Norwich has been a significant part of the curriculum since its founding in 1819. With the arrival of William W. Baylay, the first professor of instrumental music, in 1823, the Regimental Band became an all-brass band and an integral part of the daily life of cadets at Norwich.

Today, the band is a full instrumentation band—woodwinds, brass, and percussion—and it continues to perform in support of the Corps of Cadets at all formations, reviews and special parades. The Regimental Band has performed for the inauguration of several United States presidents, as well as for parades and concerts throughout Vermont and New England.

The Norwich University Regimental Band has been invited to these previous Inauguration ceremonies:

  • 21, 1961: Band and 90-man unit march for John F. Kennedy
  • 20, 1969: Band and unit march for Richard Nixon
  • 20, 1977: Band, color guard, regimental staff, drill team and banner carriers (100 total) march for Jimmy Carter
  • 21, 1985: Band and unit invited to march for Ronald Reagan (parade canceled by subzero cold)
  • 20, 1989: Band, regimental staff and color guard march for George H.W. Bush
  • 20, 2005: Band marches for George W. Bush
  • 21, 2013: Band marches for Barack H. Obama

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich Commencement | The Graduates: Hannah Bell ’16

Photo: Hannah Bell speaks to an unidentified cadet in a Norwich classroom

[content_band inner_container=”true” border=”all” padding_top=”4px” padding_bottom=”14px” bg_color=”” ]

Hannah Bell ’16

Hometown: Newberg, OR
Double Major: International Studies + Spanish
Minor: English
Student Path: Civilian
Activities:

  • Rugby Team Senior Captain
  • Four-time Women’s Rugby Div. I National Champion
  • Three-time Women’s Rugby All-American
  • Academic Achievement Center Peer Tutor
  • Undergraduate Research Ambassador

[/content_band]

[content_band inner_container=”true” border=”all” padding_top=”4px” padding_bottom=”14px” bg_color=”” ]

What Norwich Taught Me

I am driven person in part because I like to be in control….a lot of life is out of my hands and … I need to be at peace with that. Norwich taught me to time-manage and problem-solve efficiently through leadership opportunities like captaining the rugby team.[/content_band]

[content_band inner_container=”true” border=”all” padding_top=”4px” padding_bottom=”14px” bg_color=”” ]

On Academics:

The research I conducted the summer after my sophomore year was my first scholarly experience. I learned so much about process during this time. I also put together a really polished product, which is one of my accomplishments I am most proud of. I was selected to present this research … analyzing prominent, Western women novelists of the 20th century at the selective Posters on the Hill event [in Washington, D.C.]. I spoke with congressmen and their staff about my research and the importance of undergraduate research, which was an amazing experience.

Also, presenting my senior thesis for International Studies was a very proud moment. I discussed immigration policy and border security in Spain, which was a timely topic considering our own political rhetoric and the refugee crisis.[/content_band]

[content_band inner_container=”true” border=”all” padding_top=”4px” padding_bottom=”14px” bg_color=”” ]

On Athletics:

The second national championship I won in a Norwich jersey in North Carolina … It was incredible to come from behind in the final and defend out title. We came back from a 12-point [deficit]—winning in the final two minutes. Our team that year was made up of such exceptional players and people and that tournament was so much fun.[/content_band]

[content_band inner_container=”true” border=”all” padding_top=”4px” padding_bottom=”14px” bg_color=”” ]

Future Plans:

I will be heading to San Antonio to attend induction for the Teach For America San Antonio Corps. For two years I will be teaching in an under-served elementary school in San Antonio. I grew up in a household committed to social justice. My father is a Presbyterian pastor, and I always planned on … nonprofit work. I have been inspired by many great educators throughout my career and have had so much fun learning. I want to be able to help other kids fall in love with learning like I did. Ten to twenty years from now, I want to be a state prosecutor or a family doctor. I plan on taking the next two years to figure out which path to take.[/content_band]

Times Argus Editorial Takes Up Colby Symposium Keynote on War’s Cost

Norwich University Office of Communications

April 14, 2016

Norwich University’s 2016 Colby Military Writers’ Symposium garnered broad media coverage during its 21st annual event, a gathering that examines challenging issues while celebrating the best in military writing, authors, and ideas.

“The Story of Service,” an editorial in the central Vermont daily the Times Argus, took up the theme of the Colby’s keynote panel presentation “Going to War: The Cost to Families, Communities, and Nation.”

An excerpt:

[blockquote cite=”Times Argus” type=”left”]“After nearly 15 years of war, we have not taken stock of the way this generation of warriors has redefined our nation’s relationship with war. Thanking them for their service became the preferred way to welcome this current generation of veterans home. While it’s a nice thing to do, we as a country have never really shared the burden of their service, or yet really accepted our complicity in our military involvement around the world.

The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have wound down, yet our military is still deployed to more than 150 countries around the globe. We are expanding operations in Africa to meet the threat of ISIS and other terrorist organizations. Yet the cost, as has been said elsewhere, has been borne primarily by a small minority of Americans — and although Vermont has sent a relatively high proportion of its population to fight, most Vermonters were only peripherally involved.

The Colby Symposium attempts to bring writers and experts together to try to make some sense of these issues, and in doing so provides a remarkable and valuable service to Vermont.”[/blockquote]

The complete editorial is available here on the Times Argus website.

Related Articles:

Norwich in the News: VT Digger Podcasts Spotlight Colby Symposium Speakers

Norwich in the News (Video): Montpelier Weekly Chats With 2016 Colby Book Award Winner Nisid Hajari

Photo Gallery: LEGO Robotic Teams Compete at Norwich

Norwich cadets judge a recent First LEGO League event at Norwich University
Norwich University Office of Communications

November 16, 2015

Sporting names like The Snazzy, Snazzy Goldfish and distinctive team t-shirts (not to mention foam cheese-heads, lab coats, and other goofy accoutrements) middle schoolers across Vermont gathered at Norwich University to compete in the first-ever Vermont First LEGO League State Championship. (See related story.)

Founded by Segway inventor Dean Kamen, First LEGO League uses robotics as a hook to teach students the values of independent investigation, problem solving, teamwork, and community service, all while having fun.

The event marked the first state-wide championship event for Vermont. David Feinauer PhD, of Norwich University’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, says First LEGO League events like the recent one at Norwich help fill a critical gap in STEM education opportunities for middle school students.

Photographs by Mark Collier, NU Office of Communications

[slider animation=”fade” slide_time=”4000″ slide_speed=”500″ slideshow=”true” random=”true” prev_next_nav=”true” no_container=”true”] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_a.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_b.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide][slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_c.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_d.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_e.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_f.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_g.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_h.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_i.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_j.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_k.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_l.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_m.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_n.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_o.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_p.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_q.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [slide] [image src=”http://oc.norwich.edu/wp-content/uploads/FLL_r.jpg” alt=”Photo: First LEGO League competitors at Norwich University” type=”thumbnail”] [/slide] [/slider]

Norwich University Honors U.S. Senator Robert Dole in a Ceremony at the WWII Memorial in D.C.

Norwich University officials presented former U.S. Senator Robert Dole with an honorary Doctor of Public Service degree in a public ceremony at the World War II Memorial on the National Mall on Thursday, June 25, at 11 a.m.

Retired Army General Gordon R. Sullivan ’59, former Army chief of staff and chairman of the Norwich University Board of Trustees; Trustee Joel A. Kobert ’65 and Vice President for Academic Affairs Guiyou Huang joined President Richard W. Schneider during the hooding ceremony.

Norwich University was founded in 1819 by U.S. Army Captain Alden Partridge, who created Norwich to educate citizen soldiers by providing the skills necessary to both build and defend the republic. Its structure inspired the Land Grant Act of 1862, and Norwich is regarded as the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps.

Schneider has been president at Norwich for 23 years.

“Bob Dole is an American hero who lives a life that embodies the very essence of what Norwich was founded upon – leadership, integrity and service,” Schneider said. “It is an honor and a privilege to forever bond Senator Bob Dole with America’s oldest private military college, Norwich University.”

A highly decorated veteran of World War II and lifetime public servant, Robert Joseph “Bob” Dole was born July 22, 1923, in Russell, Kansas.

In 1942 he left college to enlist in the U.S. Army. He served as a combat infantry officer in Italy in 1944. During his service, he was severely wounded while attempting to save another’s life. For his actions, Dole was awarded two Purple Hearts and a Bronze Star.

Dole finished college and attended law school on the G.I. Bill. He began his political career by serving as a member of the Kansas State Legislature from 1951 to 1953, and later served four terms as prosecuting attorney for Russell County.

A U.S. Senator from Kansas from 1969to 1996, Dole served part of that time as U.S. Senate Majority Leader, setting a record as the longest-serving Republican leader.

Married to former cabinet member and former U.S. Senator Elizabeth Hanford Dole of North CarolinaNorwich’s honored 2015 commencement speaker and honorary degree recipientBob Dole was the Republican vice-presidential nominee in the 1976 U.S. presidential election and the Republican nominee in the 1996 U.S. presidential election.

In 2007, President George W. Bush appointed Dole as a co-chair, along with Donna Shalala, of the commission to investigate problems at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

Dole is special counsel at the Washington, D.C., law firm of Alston & Bird.

At the June 25 ceremony, the Honorable Robert Dole was recognized for his dedicated service to others and country before self, a Norwich guiding value celebrated during the Year of Service, the first of five years counting down to the university’s bicentennial in 2019.

Editor’s note: Pictured above (l-r) Retired Army General Gordon R. Sullivan ’59, former Army chief of staff and chairman of the Norwich University Board of Trustees; Norwich University President Richard W. Schneider, Senator Elizabeth Dole and Senator Robert Dole during the June 25 ceremony. Photo by Judy Licht

NU Wins Grant for Interdisciplinary, Environmental Service-Learning Projects

By David Westerman, PhD
Norwich University Office of Academic Research

 
May 28, 2015

Norwich University has been selected to receive a sub-grant of up to $4,000 from a four-state Campus Compact consortium and the Davis Educational Foundation to create institutional change by embedding environmental service-learning projects into courses, thereby strengthening teaching and curriculum, student learning outcomes, and interdisciplinary approaches to education.

Management of the grant program in Vermont is by the Vermont Campus Compact.

The approved proposal, submitted by Profs. Tara Kulkarni, Matthew Lutz, Tom Roberge and Dave Westerman, calls for offering an “integrated, interdisciplinary set of curriculum modifications built around geology, environmental engineering, sustainable architecture, and outdoor education, all in collaboration with the Town of Northfield and its many partners.”

Northfield zoning administrator Michele Braun will manage the project, which aims to develop an education park about flood zones along the banks of the Dog River. Sited near Northfield’s village green, the park will also include a community garden and a playground.

In their proposal, the four Norwich faculty stated: “We do this because one of the founding principles almost 200 years ago [of Norwich] was to promote experiential learning, cast in the framework of ‘service before self.’ The University’s original concept of developing the citizen soldier has evolved to match the changing nature of our nation, now striving to develop leaders to implement change for the good, from the global stage to the local neighborhood.”

The overarching issue being addressed in this integrated project was presented as follows:

“The largest overriding issue regarding the future of Earth’s habitability is climate change, with the myriad repercussions that stem from the current warming trend. We want to focus on this tremendous issue, while carrying out a project that highlights the need for interdisciplinary solutions. Our specific project addresses living with flooding, and we seek to use this as a means of helping our students, members of the local community, and ultimately the world at large as they face the process of designing solutions to global environmental change.”

Members of the grant team will receive training in June in Portland, Me., as well as ongoing support in the development and delivery of courses that will partner with community organizations to address environmental challenges.

About the Author: David S. Westerman, PhD, is the Charles A. Dana Professor of Geology at Norwich University and the Associate Vice President for Research in the university’s Office of Academic Research.

Transcript: Brig. Gen. Raymond Descheneaux’s 2015 Norwich Commissioning Address

On Sunday, May 10, 2015, Norwich University alum and United States Marine Corps Reserve Brigadier General Raymond R. Descheneaux ’87, the Corps’ Assistant Deputy Commandant for Aviation (Mobilization), addressed ROTC commissioning officers from the Class of 2015 at the formal Norwich commissioning ceremony. A copy of his prepared remarks follow.

Norwich: A Legacy of Leadership

 
Thank you, General Sullivan for that kind introduction. And thank you for all you continue to do on behalf of our University. From your earliest days as a cadet through your time as the 32nd Chief of Staff of the Army, through today, you continue to lead from the front. As Norwich’s most distinguished graduate in our school’s history, it is my honor to share this stage!

President Schneider and the Trustees of Norwich University, I want to personally thank you for this incredible opportunity to come home and be with my extended family. I cannot truly express my gratitude. It has been a pleasure getting to know each of you.

Today, Norwich is recognized globally because of your vision and guidance. In uniform our out of uniform, Norwich grads can be found making a positive difference in every corner of our planet and in every walk of life.

To MG Todd and all the distinguished guests I share this stage with; you have lived your life by example and we continue to look to you for guidance, you are a beacon of inspiration to us all.

To the Faculty and Staff, I thank you for your pushing these officers out of their comfort zone and expanding their view of the world. Because of you, their pedigree is unmatched.

To our military team of instructors, you are the ones who introduce reality to theory. You are where the rubber meets the road. You know what these officers will soon be confronting and have shaped their training accordingly. Thank you.

Before I continue, I would like to take a moment to wish all of the mothers in this gathering a Happy Mothers Day!

To the parents, family and friends who helped make this day possible, without your commitment, love, and sacrifice none of this could have ever happened.

Now, to the commissionees. I talk with you today as a brother in arms, a fellow graduate and a friend. From all of us here today, congratulations for making it through the crucible we call Norwich. As we all know, the hard part is not getting into Norwich, it is graduating from it.

The day you have been waiting for is finally here. By now, your car is, or should be, mostly packed with old uniforms, new uniforms and four years of who knows what. Mentally, there is Still a whirlwind-list of things you need to wrap up. Meanwhile, you have company in town! Then, of course, is the much anticipated, final drive down 89 South.

Well, for the next few minutes, I invite all of you to stop, catch your breath, and immerse yourself in the sights, sounds, and the atmosphere of this special event. This ceremony is an amazing moment-in-time…and it is ours to enjoy.

Today will mark the first day of your life as a commissioned officer. Before you take your Oath of Office, I would like to offer a few thoughts. As you know, what comes with this Oath is a great responsibility and an incredible challenge. As of today’s commissioning, you have one objective in life; to support and defend the Constitution of the United States.

For the United States military, this is a very complex and varied order that spans the globe. However, it truly boils down to one fundamental purpose: To fight and win our nation’s battles. Period!

You have made the conscious decision to take a path less traveled; one of military service as an officer in the United States Army, Navy, Air Force or Marine Corps.

Very soon, you can expect a high octane, rocket ship ride into the stratosphere, so tighten your chinstraps and lean forward. There may be no guardrails where you travel.

For our new officers, you have prepared your adult life for this challenge. You intuitively understand that military service is a calling and not just a job. In this world, if you are not thoroughly prepared, others depending on you may pay a painful price for your shortcomings.

I don’t have to tell this crowd, the threats are real. Many of you will be forward deployed faster than you realize. As we enjoy this morning, the reality is, our nation is locked in a clash of human wills, a war of ideas.

Right now, our enemies are actively preparing for or engaged in combat with our fellow countrymen. The enemy plays by their own rules; and for them, there are no rules.

Radical extremists, near-peer competitors, state and non-state actors top the charts of emerging or maturing threats in 2015. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, cyber-warfare, and piracy remain in the headlines. Then of course there are the natural disasters like tsunamis, earthquakes, and now Ebla outbreaks. Sprinkle in regional instability or contested space and there is your powder keg. This is the world you are inheriting, the domain you must master.

However, threats to our liberties and our Republic are nothing new. There will always be new bad guys, new technologies, and new realms of instability to overcome. After 196 years, Norwich has gotten pretty good at producing warrior-statesmen that can confront and eliminate the next new threat.

Norwich men and women with backs of steel have answered our nation’s call and have moved to the sound of gunfire since our first graduating class. This is who we are, and this class is no different. The commissioning Class of 2015 already knows this.

Based on my calculations, when the Twin Towers fell, you were in grade school. Armed conflict and the defense of all-we-hold-dear is all that you know. It seems your path to this commissioning is only natural.

You also know the price for eternal vigilance. You know the recent names, faces, and personalities of those colleagues who have made the ultimate sacrifice on our behalf. They and all of our brothers and sisters who have made this sacrifice will always be remembered. Today, we stand united as a testament to their service!

You have entered this calling with eyes wide open. You represent the next “greatest generation” of Americans and I’m proud to stand amongst your ranks.

Remember, coming from Norwich, you are well suited to operate in the modern battle space; a diverse battle space that blends combined and coalition partners, joint forces, inter-agency and non-government entities.

You will soon find yourself operating in a volatile, uncertain, and complex environment. And yes, there will be competing interests. To succeed, you will have to learn to thrive in this chaos; and master this domain!

To assist you I offer a few brief thoughts. Remember who you are and where you come from. Your family and Norwich have prepared you well for this journey.

Trust your instincts.

Reinforce your character and integrity at every turn. Never, ever compromise your standards.

Constantly seek self-improvement and master your profession with a vengeance.

Never underestimate your enemy or overestimate your capabilities.

Starting now, you must develop an intense if not insane work ethic. Sound extreme? Perhaps, but consider this, our enemies do not rest. They are preparing for you at this very moment. They are focused, driven, and unrelenting. They are resourceful. They have already been in the fight.

Some say you should “work smarter, not harder.” I say, in the world you will be operating, if you are not working both smarter and harder, you are already falling behind the power curve. For them to succeed, they must remain one step ahead of us. They trust you will be lazy, pre-occupied, and ineffective. You will prove them wrong.

You must master your profession so that you can get out in front of their thought process. The best hockey players don’t skate to where the puck is but where it is going. Anticipate failure and wrong turns when operating outside of your comfort zone. Correct your shortfalls, and never, ever give up. This is the difference between victory and defeat.

This is the new world you will be operating in! Remember this, as an officer it will never, ever be about you. It will be about the men, women, and the families in your care. Challenge, mentor and guide them to improve their physical, mental, and moral capabilities.

You will soon be handed the keys to America’s most precious natural resource, the American warfighter. Like those of yesteryear, this post 9-11 warfighter is amazing. Like you, they run like stallions, have the tenacity of a pit-bull, the cunning of a fox, and an insatiable hunger for information. They serve by choice and possess an unlimited fountain of ambition.

You will learn from them and they will learn from you. As a commissioned officer you have the additional obligation to develop and care for them. As a parent to a child, you must mentor, inspire, and always lead by example. You must also have compassion and understanding; a firm and guiding hand. They will emulate you. You are grooming our next generation of leaders.

Success is not based on machines or technology, but rather human nature and the will to succeed. This is has always been the intangible yet critical element of warfare; inspiring an individual’s will to overcome adversity. This is why the United States military is so successful in the art of “centralized command and decentralized control.”

We groom and trust our subordinates. Properly led, the American service member will deliver incredible results with their heart and soul. No threat on Earth can stop them!

And now, the torch is being passed and it is up to you. The future is yours; you will seize the moment. Like the Norwich men and women before you, there is no doubt you will blaze your own noteworthy trail in our Nation’s history!

We again want you to know how proud we are of your achievements. We know this world will be a safer place because of you. On behalf of your entire Norwich family, we wish you god-speed, fair winds and following seas as you become an officer in the United States military.

Thank you. Norwich Forever!

Norwich University to Dedicate Plaza to Dr. Erasmus Arlington “Arlie” Pond

A physician, major league pitcher, Norwich alum, and veteran of the Spanish-American War, Pond made a lasting impact fighting disease and supporting education in the Philippines
Norwich University Office of Communications

April 14, 2015

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University officials will dedicate the west end of Sabine Field as Pond Plaza in honor of Dr. Erasmus Arlington “Arlie” Pond. The ceremony will be held Thursday, April 23, during the annual April meeting of the university’s board of trustees. The memorial is made possible through the generosity of the Tawani Foundation.

An athlete, physician, humanitarian and soldier, Pond graduated from Rutland High School in 1888 and enrolled at Norwich University, where he distinguished himself as a baseball pitcher and musician. Two years later, he transferred to the University of Vermont, graduating in 1893 and completing medical school in 1895. During a medical residency and internship in Baltimore, he pitched for Major League Baseball’s Baltimore Orioles.

Called to duty as a surgeon during the Spanish-American War, Pond served in the Philippines, supporting American troops throughout the conflict and again during WWI. From 1903 until his death 27 years later, Pond remained in the Philippines, where he worked to stop the spread of disease, share his love of baseball and provide schooling for local children.

In December 2014, a group of Norwich students, staff and faculty visited the Philippines as part of a long-term effort to help the country rebuild after the devastating effects of Typhoon Haiyan. While there, the group visited the hospital Pond established there. The trip took place through the auspices of NU VISIONS Abroad, an international service-learning program coordinated by the university’s Center for Civic Engagement.

The four-year project is generously supported by a grant from the Chicago-based Tawani Foundation.

The April 23 ceremony begins at 5 p.m. and is open to the public. Please join us.

Photo caption: Dr. Erasmus Arlington “Arlie” Pond (bottom right, first row) pitched for the Baltimore Orioles during a varied career.

About the Tawani Foundation

Founded by COL (IL) Jennifer N. Pritzker, IL ARNG (Retired), Trustee Emerita of Norwich University, Tawani Foundation is a registered 501(c)(3) grant-making organization whose mission is: to enhance the awareness and understanding of the importance of the Citizen Soldier; to preserve unique sites of significance to American and military history; to foster health and wellness projects for improved quality of life; and to honor the service of military personnel, past, present and future, through an awards program that includes the JROTC/ROTC Award for Military Excellence and the Pritzker Military Museum & Library Literature Award for Lifetime Achievement in Military Writing.

About Norwich

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). www.norwich.edu

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Service” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
(802) 485-2886, (m) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu