Norwich University Center for Global Resilience and Security Co-Hosts State Hazard Mitigation Plan Working Groups

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

August 17, 2017

Norwich University’s Center for Global Resilience and Security together with Vermont Emergency Management will co-host Vermont’s Hazard Mitigation Action Planning workshop on Tuesday, Aug. 22, from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. in Kreitzberg Library.

The workshop brings together Vermonters from diverse walks of life to develop a sound plan and informed actions to build resilience and create a stronger Vermont. In May, the 2018 Hazard Mitigation Plan’s vision that “Vermont will be safe and resilient in the face of climate change and natural disasters” was approved. The mission of the group: “To protect life, property, natural resources and quality of life in Vermont by reducing our vulnerability to climate change and natural disasters” was also approved.

Several goals, and overarching principles now guide the work assigned to three groups in the following topic areas: Environment & Natural Systems; Built Environment; and Plans and Policies. In addition, a steering committee will work on a fourth goal categorized under Education and Outreach, which emerged from the meetings of the steering committee, and working groups so far.

The meeting is open to the public. Anyone interested in joining, please register with Stephanie.a.smith@vermont.gov. Learn more about Vermont Emergency Management here: http://vem.vermont.gov/plans/SHMP.

Launched in 2017, the Center for Global Resilience and Security (CGRS) is a Norwich University research center of excellence dedicated to the advancement of the interrelationships between human resilience and sense of security in the face of global challenges. Its first major initiative upon its founding was to take over the role of coordinating the Resilient Vermont Network and host its annual conference, among other activities. CGRS is focused on challenges in the areas of climate change, water, energy, and infrastructure and their impact on resilience and security. CGRS will craft creative, innovative, and sustainable solutions for building resilient communities, through inter-disciplinary research and design collaboration.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Norwich University’s Center for Global Resilience and Security Holds Summit for Community Resilience Organizations and Researchers

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

April 17, 2017

Norwich University’s Center for Global Resilience and Security, in collaboration with Community Resilience Organizations (CROs) will hold the “CROs-ARC Summit: Think Global, Act Local,” an event to connect statewide CROs teams and academic researchers interested in participating in the new Academic Research Collaborative (ARC) on Saturday, April 29, 2017 from 8:15 a.m.-1:45 p.m.

The summit provides a day of short, inspiring presentations by local action teams (CROs), resource providers, and academic researchers (ARC), plus a noon lecture on social engagement by Rebecca Sanborn Stone, a community planner, engagement specialist, writer and speaker with expertise in resilience, local capacity building and communications.

Presentations include ecological solutions, with NU’s Simon Pearish and Lyndon State’s Ian Balcom; water and energy resilience; cybersecurity with NU’s Huw Read; and art integration. Informational showcase highlights housing, water, energy, climate, food systems, hazard mitigation, etc. from state agency experts and non-profit groups.

Peg Elmer Hough and Amanda Blank with CROs; Jared Ulmer with the Department of Health’s Climate and Health Program; Paige Heverly of Vital Communities (Energy and Transportation project coordinator); and Ben Rose, Recovery and Mitigation Section Chief, Vermont Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, are some of the key Vermont experts presenting at the summit.

The CROs-ARC Summit is slated to end early enough to allow participants to join the Climate Rally at the statehouse in Montpelier, scheduled from 1 – 4 p.m.

“This event is to help the CROs strengthen their teams, learn about new and existing resources and get the latest updates in areas critical to resilience and security in their communities,” Center for Global Resilience and Security Director Tara Kulkarni, Ph.D. said. “We also want to connect academic researchers to the problems facing the CRO teams and engage students in the discussion.”

Registration Fee: $35 includes breakfast and lunch. Registration deadline is April 20, 2017, at: https://alumni.norwich.edu/CROsARCsummit.

The summit is sponsored by: Catamount Solar, Vermont Community Resilience Organizations, Center for Global Resilience and Security at Norwich University, Center for Civic Engagement at Norwich University.

The Center for Global Resilience and Security (CGRS) is a Norwich University research center of excellence dedicated to the advancement of the interrelationships between human resilience and sense of security in the face of global challenges. CGRS is focused on challenges in the areas of climate change, water, energy, and infrastructure and their impact on resilience and security. CGRS will craft creative, innovative, and sustainable solutions for building resilient communities, through inter-disciplinary research and design collaboration.

For more information, please contact: nucgrs@norwich.edu.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
dlarkin@norwich.edu

“Fire & Ice” Author Jonathan Mingle Visits Norwich Writers Series

Photo: Author Jonathan Mingle speaks at lecture in Kreitzberg Library on the Norwich campus

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zb9RS4_TCqE&w=560&h=315]

Norwich University Office of Communications

November 1, 2016

On campus for a Norwich Writers Series reading last week, journalist and author Jonathan Mingle took time to discuss three central ideas from his recent book on black carbon, global warming, and its impact on a small Himalayan village. Norwich Associate Writing Professor and Writers Series Director Sean Prentiss makes a cameo. And Tara Kulkarni, an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, discusses how Mingle’s book and reading helps her students as academics, researchers, and citizens by cutting across disciplines—using story to connect climate change, people, and policy.

Norwich Writers Series Continues With Environmental Author Jonathan Mingle

Photo of Jonathan Mingle taken outside against a forested backdrop
NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Oct. 10, 2016

Norwich University’s 2016-17 Writers Series continues with environmental author Jonathan Mingle on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 4 p.m. in the Kreitzberg Library Multipurpose Room.

Free and open to the public, Mingle will read from his book and answer questions about environmental writing, climate issues, and black carbon.

Mingle graduated from the Energy and Resources Group at University of California, Berkeley; is a former Middlebury Fellow in Environmental Journalism and a recipient of the American Alpine Club’s Zack Martin Breaking Barriers Award.

He is the author of Fire and Ice: Soot, Solidarity, and Survival on the Roof of the World, a nonfiction narrative about black carbon pollution, its health and climate impacts around the world, and solutions for cleaning it up. His writing on the environment, climate, and development has appeared in The New York Times, Slate, The Boston Globe, and many other places.

Free and open to the public, this event is hosted by The David Crawford School of Engineering, the department of Environmental Science, the Peace and War Center and the Writers Series. Norwich Writers Series is produced by the College of Liberal Arts Department of English and Communications.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Video: Inside Norwich’s C.A.S.A. 802 Tiny House

Video still: Architect and NU Assistant Professor Tolya Stonorov speaks in front of bright red orange door of C.A.S.A. 802 tiny house.
Norwich University Office of Communications

September 27, 2016

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0upWIKBCXQ&w=560&h=315]

Learn more about C.A.S.A. 802, a modular, tiny house project designed and built by faculty and students from Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art, David Crawford School of Engineering, and construction management programs. Energy efficient and sustainably designed, the $30,000 structure offers a modern alternative to mobile homes for young families and can be expanded over time.

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Ideas @ Work: Tiny House

Norwich University hosts Resilient Vermont Conference

NORWICH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

May 13, 2016

Norwich University is hosting the Institute for Sustainable Communities’ inaugural Resilient Vermont Conference Friday and Saturday, May 20-21.

This interactive event will bring together community leaders, municipal officials, organizations and agencies working to strengthen Vermont’s resilience to climate change and other challenges. Participants will gain the skills, ideas, inspiration, connections and resources for on-the-ground action to make the community stronger, more vibrant, and better prepared.

“Vermonters continue to face climate-related challenges like powerful storms and warming temperatures, all while navigating shifting economies and new policies,” conference organizer Rebecca Stone said. “We must act now to protect our treasured people and places.”

The conference offers over 30 workshops including several led by Norwich faculty and staff. On Saturday, Associate VP for Communications and Marketing Kathleen Murphy-Moriarty will teach about effective messaging; Professors Huw Read and Kris Rowley will present on cybersecurity Friday and Saturday; Professor of Civil Engineering Edwin Schmeckpeper will serve on Friday’s panel discussing “Housing Vulnerable Populations;” Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering Tara Kulkarni will serve on Friday’s panel “Report Card for Vermont’s Infrastructure,” and is part of a three-person team leading the “GSI: Northfield – Walking Tour of Green Infrastructure and Flood Recovery,” which is offered on both Friday and Saturday.

In August 2011 Hurricane Irene devastated parts of the town of Northfield. In the months that followed, Norwich students gave over 4,000 hours in clean up and recovery efforts.

Norwich was the first private school in the country to teach engineering, and

according to APPA data, Norwich University has been one of the most energy efficient campuses in the country for the past 20-plus years.

Norwich has undertaken a wide range of measures to improve energy efficiency on campus including: upgrade to more efficient boilers at its Central Power Plant; replacement of all old, poorly insulated steam distribution lines; installation of a cogeneration system; use of powerful building control systems; installation of heat recovery systems; building of a biomass system that replaces the burning of fuel oil with the burning of locally-sourced wood chips to heat 98 percent of campus, and use of only high efficiency lighting and motors.

Norwich has two LEED certified dormitories, and all renovations and new construction includes the installation of proven, high efficiency systems.

Norwich University is committed to providing a world class education by integrating sustainability across curricula. Recent projects include: an award winning solar house in the US Dept. of Energy’s Solar Decathlon; affordable, micro solar houses; original research in water run-off filtering and recovery, and building an outdoor classroom at Northfield High School.

For more information and to purchase tickets for the two-day conference (cost $45) see the conference website: https://resilientvt.org/action/conference/.

About the Institute for Sustainable Communities

An international nonprofit organization, the Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC) has 25 years of practical experience working with local leaders to accelerate climate change and sustainability solutions. ISC’s programs are designed to facilitate peer learning and engagement among local leaders charged with the work of making their communities more sustainable. ISC has led more than 103 projects in 30 countries, and currently works in China, India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Thailand and the United States. Learn more here.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
dlarkin@norwich.edu

Ideas @ Work: #1 Tiny House

CAD rendering of Norwich University's CASA initiative tiny house design.
33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Sometimes a big problem requires a small solution. Enter the CASA initiative, a 334-square-foot tiny house with a small $40,000 price tag, solar power included. Norwich University faculty and students developed the house to address Vermont’s affordable-housing crisis. Nearly 12 percent of Vermonters live below the poverty level, and median household income in the state barely tops $54,000. That leaves many low-income residents priced out of the traditional housing market. Those who can, often turn to mobile homes, which cost around $39,900 on average and are typically financed with car loans. But, unlike traditional houses, mobile homes depreciate in value over time.

Seeking to provide an alternative, the Norwich School of Architecture + Art faculty launched the Creating Affordable Sustainable Architecture (CASA) initiative last year. Sparked by a $20,000 seed grant from TD Bank, architecture faculty Tolya Stonorov, Danny Sagan, Cara Armstrong, and Matt Lutz worked on the initial design over the summer. Last fall, CASA principal investigator and civil engineering professor Ed Schmeckpeper began designing and assembling the build-out with Norwich engineering and construction management students. This spring, junior and senior architecture students in a design/build studio led by Professor Stonorov will complete the project.

With clean lines and a gabled roof, the nearly 14- by 28-foot home offers a modernist, minimalist take on a classic Vermont farmhouse. Sliding glass doors open from its small front porch onto a high-ceilinged living room/kitchen/dining area. Beyond lies a bathroom, bedroom, and storage space. The tiny home can accommodate two adults and a child. Solar panels supply the home’s electricity needs, while even more high-powered engineering lies under the roof. Starting next year, the CASA initiative team plans to develop additional units that can “plug” into the starter house, enabling households with growing families and incomes to expand.

Stonorov says CASA’s ultimate goal is to create a house that is not just beautiful, practical, and affordable—but widely available. The CASA team aims to partner with organizations that share the goal of bringing innovative, sustainable housing to income-eligible Vermonters. “This project will fail to fulfill its mission if we only produce one.”

Photo illustration courtesy Tolya Stonorov
More Ideas@Work:

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Ideas @ Work: #32 Sparkling Tree Water

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

On Arbor Day last year, Asarasi CEO and NU alum Adam Lazar M’06 debuted Sparkling Tree Water, his first in a line of planned beverages produced from maple trees. The lightly carbonated, filtered water represents a tiny portion of the estimated 500 million gallons of water that is a by-product of New England and Canada’s maple sugaring industry. In an interview with Innovation Destination: Hartford, Lazar described his start-up as an impact-focused business. “We are impacting water conservation [and] creating value-added products to the maple farming communities of North America.”

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Ideas @ Work: #14 Local Chow

33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.

The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Norwich is one of a number of Vermont colleges that has worked with food-service giant Sodexo to turn the multi-billion-dollar behemoth into a locavore. One of the world’s largest employers, the Paris-based company serves 34,000 meals in the state of Vermont every day, including those at the Wise Campus Center dining hall. Sodexo recently launched a “Vermont First” program to source more of its produce, meat, and dairy from the state’s roughly 7,000 farms.

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Ideas @ Work: #2 Biomass Plant

Photo of woodchips spilling into hopper at Norwich biomass heating plant
33 ideas big and small from Norwich students, faculty, staff, and alumni that are transforming campus and the world.
The Norwich Record

Spring 2016

Twenty-five years ago, NU’s current Chief Administrative Officer Dave Magida floated the idea of adding a biomass heating plant to the university’s oil-fired central heating system. The new plant could be supplied with sustainably harvested woodchips from nearby forests. At the time, the project wasn’t economically feasible, but thanks to significant improvements in efficiency and to a low-interest-rate loan from Tawani Enterprises, Magida’s idea became a reality. The plant went online in 2013. In its first two years of operation, it saved the university over $2.3 million in heating costs, offset more than 1.4 million gallons of fuel oil, and reduced CO2 emissions by 13,608 tons. Even with today’s rock-bottom fuel prices, Magida says BTUs produced from woodchips are still 38 percent cheaper than oil, and having the option to burn either fuel helps circumvent supply disruptions and wild price swings.

More Ideas@Work:

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